Human Molecular Genetics

http://hmg.oxfordjournals.org

List of Papers (Total 7,167)

Challenges and novel approaches for investigating molecular mediation

Understanding mediation is useful for identifying intermediates lying between an exposure and an outcome which, when intervened upon, will block (some or all of) the causal pathway between the exposure and outcome. Mediation approaches used in conventional epidemiology have been adapted to understanding the role of molecular intermediates in situations of high-dimensional omics ...

Genetics and immunity in the era of single-cell genomics

Recent developments in the field of single-cell genomics (SCG) are changing our understanding of how functional phenotypes of cell populations emerge from the behaviour of individual cells. Some of the applications of SCG include the discovery of new gene networks and novel cell subpopulations, fine mapping of transcription kinetics, and the relationships between cell clonality and ...

Proteomics to study DNA-bound and chromatin-associated gene regulatory complexes

High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a powerful method for the identification of soluble protein complexes and large-scale affinity purification screens can decode entire protein interaction networks. In contrast, protein complexes residing on chromatin have been much more challenging, because they are difficult to purify and often of very low abundance. ...

A genome-wide association meta-analysis on apolipoprotein A-IV concentrations

Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is a major component of HDL and chylomicron particles and is involved in reverse cholesterol transport. It is an early marker of impaired renal function. We aimed to identify genetic loci associated with apoA-IV concentrations and to investigate relationships with known susceptibility loci for kidney function and lipids. A genome-wide association ...

Reduction of TMEM97 increases NPC1 protein levels and restores cholesterol trafficking in Niemann-pick type C1 disease cells

Niemann-Pick type C disease (NP-C) is a progressive lysosomal lipid storage disease caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. NPC1 is essential for transporting cholesterol and other lipids out of lysosomes, but little is known about the mechanisms that control its cellular abundance and localization. Here we show that a reduction of TMEM97, a cholesterol-responsive ...

Deletion of amelotin exons 3–6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta

Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions that result in defective dental enamel formation. Amelotin (AMTN) is a secreted protein thought to act as a promoter of matrix mineralization in the final stage of enamel development, and is strongly expressed, almost exclusively, in maturation stage ameloblasts. Amtn overexpression and Amtn knockout mouse ...

Ectodysplasin signalling deficiency in mouse models of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia leads to middle ear and nasal pathology

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) results from mutation of the EDA, EDAR or EDARADD genes and is characterized by reduced or absent eccrine sweat glands, hair follicles and teeth, and defective formation of salivary, mammary and craniofacial glands. Mouse models with HED also carry Eda, Edar or Edaradd mutations and have defects that map to the same structures. Patients with ...

Genetic ablation of IP3 receptor 2 increases cytokines and decreases survival of SOD1G93A mice

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective death of motor neurons. Disease pathophysiology is complex and not yet fully understood. Higher gene expression of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 2 gene (ITPR2), encoding the IP3 receptor 2 (IP3R2), was detected in sporadic ALS patients. Here, we ...

Identification of plexin A4 as a novel clusterin receptor links two Alzheimer’s disease risk genes

Although abundant genetic and biochemical evidence strongly links Clusterin (CLU) to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis, the receptor for CLU within the adult brain is currently unknown. Using unbiased approaches, we identified Plexin A4 (PLXNA4) as a novel, high-affinity receptor for CLU in the adult brain. PLXNA4 protein expression was high in brain with much lower levels in ...

A recurrent p.Arg92Trp variant in steroidogenic factor-1 (NR5A1) can act as a molecular switch in human sex development

Cell lineages of the early human gonad commit to one of the two mutually antagonistic organogenetic fates, the testis or the ovary. Some individuals with a 46,XX karyotype develop testes or ovotestes (testicular or ovotesticular disorder of sex development; TDSD/OTDSD), due to the presence of the testis-determining gene, SRY. Other rare complex syndromic forms of TDSD/OTDSD are ...

Autophagic lysosome reformation dysfunction in glucocerebrosidase deficient cells: relevance to Parkinson disease

Glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene mutations increase the risk of Parkinson disease (PD). While the cellular mechanisms associating GBA1 mutations and PD are unknown, loss of the glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) activity, inhibition of autophagy and increased α-synuclein levels have been implicated. Here we show that autophagy lysosomal reformation (ALR) is compromised in cells ...

MeCP2 deficiency results in robust Rett-like behavioural and motor deficits in male and female rats

Since the identification of MECP2 as the causative gene in the majority of Rett Syndrome (RTT) cases, transgenic mouse models have played a critical role in our understanding of this disease. The use of additional mammalian RTT models offers the promise of further elucidating critical early mechanisms of disease as well as providing new avenues for translational studies. We have ...

Loss of MeCP2 in the rat models regression, impaired sociability and transcriptional deficits of Rett syndrome

Mouse models of the transcriptional modulator Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2) have advanced our understanding of Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a ‘prototypical’ neurodevelopmental disorder with many clinical features overlapping with other intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Therapeutic interventions for RTT may therefore have broader applications. However, the ...

Long-range regulators of the lncRNA HOTAIR enhance its prognostic potential in breast cancer

Predicting response to endocrine therapy and survival in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer is a significant clinical challenge and novel prognostic biomarkers are needed. Long-range regulators of gene expression are emerging as promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets for human diseases, so we have explored the potential of distal enhancer elements of non-coding RNAs in ...

A reduction in Drp1-mediated fission compromises mitochondrial health in autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix Saguenay

The neurodegenerative disease autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix Saguenay (ARSACS) is caused by loss of function of sacsin, a modular protein that is required for normal mitochondrial network organization. To further understand cellular consequences of loss of sacsin, we performed microarray analyses in sacsin knockdown cells and ARSACS patient fibroblasts. This ...

SUGP1 is a novel regulator of cholesterol metabolism

A large haplotype on chromosome 19p13.11 tagged by rs10401969 in intron 8 of SURP and G patch domain containing 1 (SUGP1) is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), plasma LDL cholesterol levels, and other energy metabolism phenotypes. Recent studies have suggested that TM6SF2 is the causal gene within the locus, but we postulated that this locus could harbor additional CAD ...

MeCP2 co-ordinates liver lipid metabolism with the NCoR1/HDAC3 corepressor complex

Rett syndrome (RTT; OMIM 312750), a progressive neurological disorder, is caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2; OMIM 300005), a ubiquitously expressed factor. A genetic suppressor screen designed to identify therapeutic targets surprisingly revealed that downregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway improves neurological phenotypes in Mecp2 mutant ...

Meckel’s and condylar cartilages anomalies in achondroplasia result in defective development and growth of the mandible

Activating FGFR3 mutations in human result in achondroplasia (ACH), the most frequent form of dwarfism, where cartilages are severely disturbed causing long bones, cranial base and vertebrae defects. Because mandibular development and growth rely on cartilages that guide or directly participate to the ossification process, we investigated the impact of FGFR3 mutations on mandibular ...

Altered RNA metabolism due to a homozygous RBM7 mutation in a patient with spinal motor neuropathy

The exosome complex is the most important RNA processing machinery within the cell. Mutations in its subunits EXOSC8 and EXOSC3 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and central nervous system demyelination. We present a patient with SMA-like phenotype carrying a homozygous mutation in RBM7—a subunit of the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex—which is ...

RNA-Seq of Huntington’s disease patient myeloid cells reveals innate transcriptional dysregulation associated with proinflammatory pathway activation

Innate immune activation beyond the central nervous system is emerging as a vital component of the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The systemic innate immune system is thought to act as a modifier of disease progression; however, the molecular mechanisms ...

Restoration of SMN in Schwann cells reverses myelination defects and improves neuromuscular function in spinal muscular atrophy

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by low levels of SMN protein, primarily affecting lower motor neurons. Recent evidence from SMA and related conditions suggests that glial cells can influence disease severity. Here, we investigated the role of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system by creating SMA mice selectively overexpressing SMN in ...

Deletion of CTNNB1 in inhibitory circuitry contributes to autism-associated behavioral defects

Mutations in β-catenin (CTNNB1) have been implicated in cancer and mental disorders. Recently, loss-of-function mutations of CTNNB1 were linked to intellectual disability (ID), and rare mutations were identified in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As a key regulator of the canonical Wnt pathway, CTNNB1 plays an essential role in neurodevelopment. However, the function ...

Glucocerebrosidase modulates cognitive and motor activities in murine models of Parkinson’s disease

Mutations in GBA1, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, are associated with an enhanced risk of developing synucleinopathies such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. A higher prevalence and increased severity of motor and non-motor symptoms is observed in PD patients harboring mutant GBA1 alleles, suggesting a link between the gene or gene product and ...

Structural and molecular myelination deficits occur prior to neuronal loss in the YAC128 and BACHD models of Huntington disease

White matter (WM) atrophy is a significant feature of Huntington disease (HD), although its aetiology and early pathological manifestations remain poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to characterize WM-related features in the transgenic YAC128 and BACHD models of HD. Using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), we demonstrate that microstructural WM abnormalities ...

The heritability and patterns of DNA methylation in normal human colorectum

DNA methylation (DNAm) has been linked to changes in chromatin structure, gene expression and disease. The DNAm level can be affected by genetic variation; although, how this differs by CpG dinucleotide density and genic location of the DNAm site is not well understood. Moreover, the effect of disease causing variants on the DNAm level in a tissue relevant to disease has yet to be ...