Netherlands Heart Journal

http://link.springer.com/journal/12471

List of Papers (Total 836)

Reproducibility of right-to-left shunt quantification using transthoracic contrast echocardiography in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

AimTransthoracic contrast echocardiography (TTCE) is recommended for screening of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Shunt quantification is used to find treatable PAVMs. So far, there has been no study investigating the reproducibility of this diagnostic test. Therefore, this study aimed to describe inter-observer and inter...

A clinical approach to arrhythmias revisited in 2018

Understanding arrhythmias and their treatment is not always easy. The current straightforward approach with catheter ablation and device therapy is an amazing achievement, but does not make management of underlying or other cardiac disease and pharmacological therapy unnecessary. The goal of this paper is to describe how much of the knowledge of the 1980s and early 1990s can and...

Inherited cardiomyopathies and sports participation

Competitive sports activity is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiovascular death in adolescents and young adults with inherited cardiomyopathies. Many young subjects aspire to continue competitive sport after a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy and the clinician is frequently confronted with the problem of eligibility and the request of designing specific exercise...

Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation in athletes: what we know and what we do not know

Exercise is an emerging cause of atrial fibrillation (AF) in young individuals without coexisting cardiovascular risk factors. The causes of exercise-induced atrial fibrillation remain largely unknown, and conclusions are jeopardised by apparently conflicting data. Some components of the athlete’s heart are known to be arrhythmogenic in other settings. Bradycardia, atrial...

Sudden cardiac arrest on the field of play: turning tragedy into a survivable event

Sudden cardiac arrest remains the leading cause of death in exercising athletes, and recent studies have shown that it occurs more frequently than historical estimates. While out-of-hospital cardiac arrest often proves fatal, advance preparation can improve outcomes and the chance of survival. First responders to a collapsed athlete on the field of play may include team medical...

Athletes with channelopathy may be eligible to play

The European and Bethesda recommendations roughly state that any athlete with channelopathy is not eligible to participate in sports on a presumed risk of potentially life-threatening ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. However, eligibility decision-making on a presumed risk of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation is debatable. Channelopathies are primary electrical...

Pre-participation screening of asymptomatic athletes

Catastrophic events, be it traffic accidents, natural disasters or homicides, always lead to scrutiny. Could we have seen the event coming and could it have been prevented? In the case of a sudden cardiac arrest of a seemingly healthy athlete the public outcry is not any different. Despite an intrinsic appeal for screening to prevent similar events, there is no evidence that...

A new consensus document on electrocardiographic interpretation in athletes: does it help to prevent sudden cardiac death in athletes?

Sudden cardiac arrest or death (SCA/SCD) in athletes has a low event rate. Pre-participation or eligibility screening is a widely accepted method of primary prevention of SCA/SCD in athletes. Most European countries and international sports governing bodies perform ECG-inclusive screening. However, implementation of a resting 12-lead ECG in pre-participation or eligibility...