Children's Literature in Education

http://link.springer.com/journal/10583

List of Papers (Total 19)

Beyond the Characters and the Reader? Digital Discussions on Intersectionality in The Murderer’s Ape

This article presents an analysis of a recent, award-winning Swedish novel for children and young adults, The Murderer’s Ape by Jakob Wegelius, and digitally published reviews of the novel. In the first part of the paper, we provide an intersectional analysis of the novel, focusing on gender, profession, species and class. The protagonist and narrator of The Murderer’s Ape is not ...

From Representation to Participation: Rethinking the Intercultural Educational Approach to Folktales

In multi- or intercultural educational contexts, folktales from around the world are often approached as representative of diverse cultures and used to transmit knowledge and understanding of the literary, social and cultural heritage of those cultures to children. In this article, I present contemporary critical literary, folklore and cultural studies’ perspectives to argue that ...

A Democracy of Children’s Literature Critics? The Opportunities and Risks of Paying Attention to Open Reviews and Mass Discussion

Drawing on the outputs of a wider democracy of online reviewers presents the academic study of children’s literature with opportunities and challenges, and can enhance critical discussion. As it is now easy to locate a large number of online reviews, it is argued that children’s literature studies needs to make room for a wider range of critical voices. This article reports on the ...

Representations of Dictatorship in Contemporary Chilean Children’s Literature

This article addresses the disturbing fact that few contemporary Chilean children’s books deal with Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973–1990). It explores why dictatorship has such an elusive presence in contemporary Chilean children’s literature, how it has been represented in general, and how children are portrayed in books that do address Pinochet’s oppressive regime. Four ...

“The Soldiers Came to the House”: Young Children’s Responses to The Colour of Home

This article begins by reflecting on the present refugee crisis and its relevance to children in the UK. It identifies the need for teaching about the refugee experience to young children and argues that literature can provide a conduit for this. Since the millennium there has been a rapid increase in the number of books published for children which take this as their theme, aimed ...

Construing the Child Reader: A Cognitive Stylistic Analysis of the Opening to Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book

Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book (2009) charts the story of Nobody Owens, a boy who is adopted by supernatural entities in the local graveyard after his family is murdered. This article draws on the notion of the “construed reader,” and combines two cognitive stylistic frameworks to analyse the opening section of the novel. In doing so, the article explores the representation and ...

“What is the Use of a Book Without Pictures?” An Exploration of the Impact of Illustrations on Reading Experience in A Monster Calls

This article examines the effect of Jim Kay’s illustrations on the experience of reading A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness. The author compares the responses of six Key Stage Three children (11–14 years old), three of whom were given an illustrated version of the text, and three a non-illustrated version. The children with an illustrated copy engaged with the text more deeply and ...

Is that Us? Dealing with the ‘Black’ Pages of History in Historical Fiction for Children (1996–2010)

History has been in the centre of political interest over the last two decades; claimed as a vehicle to strengthen social cohesion, especially among future citizens. At the same time an acknowledgement of episodes such as slavery and colonialism are asked for. This article investigates the tension that results with those two appeals to history in the literary representation of the ...

What has Harry Potter Done for Me? Children’s Reflections on their ‘Potter Experience’

This article reports findings from a small-scale focus-group study funded by the British Academy. Drawing on Herbert Marsh and Richard Shavelson’s notion of “Academic Self-Concept” and David Barton and Mary Hamilton’s view of literacy as context-specific social practices, the authors examine what young British Harry Potter enthusiasts perceive as the influence of the novels on ...

“‘Look More Closely,’ Said Mum”: Mothers in Anthony Browne’s Picture Books

In this article, Vanessa Joosen explores Anthony Browne’s construction of motherhood in four of his picture books that focus on family. She focuses on the use of narratological perspective, visual point of view, and intertextual references to explain how an ideology of motherhood is evoked. While Browne makes use of child narrators and focalizers whose view of their mothers is ...

Performing Motherhood: Introduction to a Special Issue on Mothering in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

This brief introduction to the essays in the special issue on mothering in children’s and young adult literature spells out the dominant theme of the essays, which is the way cultural scripts, including those found in children’s and young adult literature and culture, act as paratexts that condition the practice of mothering.

“I’m Glad I was Designed”: Un/Doing Gender and Class in Susan Price’s “Odin Trilogy”

Susan Price’s “Odin Trilogy” (2005–2008) is a juvenile science fiction series that depicts a future where class relations have become polarised due to late capitalist and technological developments and where ways of doing gender continue to be strongly connected with class. The society in the novels is based on slavery: people are either Freewomen/Freemen or bonders. Here wealth ...

Reading Picturebooks as Literature: Four-to-Six-Year-Old Children and the Development of Literary Competence

This article explores what it means to be a competent reader of picture storybooks by examining the abilities of some 4–6-year-olds, who were read stories aloud in class. Jonathan Culler’s concept of “literary competence” was used to tease out the children’s implicit knowledge of the structures and conventions that enable them to read a work of fiction as literature. From a more ...

Hunting Reynard: How Reynard the Fox Tricked his Way into English and Dutch Children’s Literature

This article examines adaptations in their capacity of preserving literary heritage. It describes how the Middle Dutch beast epic Reynard the Fox lost its position in literature for adults and became part of a literary heritage that was no longer read but only studied for its historical value. Versions for children kept the story alive. A comparison of English and Dutch adaptations ...

Tale of an Innocent

The British novelist Nicky Singer talks about becoming a writer, the role of editors and about who decides what can—and what can’t—be published either side of the Atlantic. Her three novels explore territory which can make publishers nervous: Feather Boy (initiation rites and domestic violence), Doll (self-harm) and The Innocent’s Story (terrorist suicide bombing). The sharply ...

Erratum

Correction