International Journal of Social Robotics

http://link.springer.com/journal/12369

List of Papers (Total 79)

Directing Attention Through Gaze Hints Improves Task Solving in Human–Humanoid Interaction

In this paper, we report an experimental study designed to examine how participants perceive and interpret social hints from gaze exhibited by either a robot or a human tutor when carrying out a matching task. The underlying notion is that knowing where an agent is looking at provides cues that can direct attention to an object of interest during the activity. In this regard, we...

Language Use in Joint Action: The Means of Referring Expressions

This study examined how human–human collaboration can be achieved through an exchange of verbal information in exchanging information about the referents in a joint action. Knowing other people’s referential intention is fundamental for joint action. Joint action can be achieved verbally by two types of referring expressions, namely, symbolic and deictic referring expressions...

Adaptive Robotic Tutors that Support Self-Regulated Learning: A Longer-Term Investigation with Primary School Children

Robots are increasingly being used to provide motivating, engaging and personalised support to learners. These robotic tutors have been able to increase student learning gain by providing personalised hints or problem selection. However, they have never been used to assist children in developing self regulated learning (SRL) skills. SRL skills allow a learner to more effectively...

Here Comes the Bad News: Doctor Robot Taking Over

To test in how far the Media Equation and Computers Are Social Actors (CASA) validly explain user responses to social robots, we manipulated how a bad health message was framed and the language that was used. In the wake of Experiment 2 of Burgers et al. (Patient Educ Couns 89(2):267–273, 2012.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2012.08.008), a human versus robot doctor delivered...

Affective Touch in Human–Robot Interaction: Conveying Emotion to the Nao Robot

Affective touch has a fundamental role in human development, social bonding, and for providing emotional support in interpersonal relationships. We present, what is to our knowledge, the first HRI study of tactile conveyance of both positive and negative emotions (affective touch) on the Nao robot, and based on an experimental set-up from a study of human–human tactile...

Developing a Prototyping Method for Involving Children in the Design of Classroom Robots

Including children in the design of technologies that will have an impact on their daily lives is one of the pillars of user-centered design. Educational robots are an example of such a technology where children’s involvement is important. However, the form in which this involvement should take place is still unclear. Children do not have a lot of experience with educational...

“I Know That Now, I’m Going to Learn This Next” Promoting Self-regulated Learning with a Robotic Tutor

Robots are increasingly being used to provide motivating, engaging and personalised support to learners. Robotic tutors have been able to increase student learning gain by providing personalised hints or problem selection. However, they have never been used to assist children in developing self regulated learning (SRL) skills. SRL skills allow a learner to more effectively self...

Long-Term Cohabitation with a Social Robot: A Case Study of the Influence of Human Attachment Patterns

This paper presents the methodology, setup and results of a study involving long-term cohabitation with a fully autonomous social robot. During the experiment, three people with different attachment styles (as defined by John Bowlby) spent ten days each with an EMYS type robot, which was installed in their own apartments. It was hypothesized that the attachment patterns...

The Effect of Emotions and Social Behavior on Performance in a Collaborative Serious Game Between Humans and Autonomous Robots

The aim of this paper is to investigate performance in a collaborative human–robot interaction on a shared serious game task. Furthermore, the effect of elicited emotions and perceived social behavior categories on players’ performance will be investigated. The participants collaboratively played a turn-taking version of the Tower of Hanoi serious game, together with the human...

Automatically Classifying User Engagement for Dynamic Multi-party Human–Robot Interaction

A robot agent designed to engage in real-world human–robot joint action must be able to understand the social states of the human users it interacts with in order to behave appropriately. In particular, in a dynamic public space, a crucial task for the robot is to determine the needs and intentions of all of the people in the scene, so that it only interacts with people who...

On the Imitation of Goal Directed Movements of a Humanoid Robot

Interacting with a social robot should give people a better understanding of the robot’s actions and intentions. In terms of human–human interaction (HHI), people can interpret actions of others in an effortless way. However, it is still unclear whether people can do the same with humanoid robots. Imitation (of the robot’s actions) provides us with an intuitive means for solving...

Cooperative Dynamic Manipulation of Unknown Flexible Objects

Cooperative dynamic manipulation enlarges the manipulation repertoire of human–robot teams. By means of synchronized swinging motion, a human and a robot can continuously inject energy into a bulky and flexible object in order to place it onto an elevated location and outside the partners’ workspace. Here, we design leader and follower controllers based on the fundamental...

Avoiding Playfulness Gone Wrong: Exploring Multi-objective Reaching Motion Generation in a Social Robot

Companion robots will be able to perform useful tasks in homes and public places, while also providing entertainment through playful interactions. “Playful” here means fun, happy, and humorous. A challenge is that generating playful motions requires a non-trivial understanding of how people attribute meaning and intentions. The literature suggests that playfulness can lead to...

Case Report: Implications of Doing Research on Socially Assistive Robots in Real Homes

The current paper addresses the implications of doing research on socially assistive robots in real homes. In contrast to laboratory studies, studies of robots in their intended natural environments can provide insights into people’s experiences of robots, and if and how a robot becomes embedded and used in people’s everyday life. However, moving robots out of the lab and into...

The Sense of Commitment in Human–Robot Interaction

The sense of commitment is a fundamental building block of human social life. By generating and/or stabilizing expectations about contributions that individual agents will make to the goals of other agents or to shared goals, a sense of commitment can facilitate the planning and coordination of actions involving multiple agents. Moreover, it can also increase individual agents...

Understanding Therapists’ Needs and Attitudes Towards Robotic Support. The Roboterapia Project

Robots have been recently used as valuable therapeutic devices in numerous studies (especially with children with developmental needs), but their role as more general support for therapists is less well studied. However, as robots become better integrated in therapeutic environments, they will also influence therapists; and if robots are designed correctly, they could positively...

An Ethical Evaluation of Human–Robot Relationships

When people interact with socially interactive robots on a regular basis, it could be that people start developing some kind of relationship with such robots. People are able to get attached to several objects in our everyday world. However, the relationships we build with regular objects differ significantly from those we may build with socially interactive robots. In contrast...

Making New “New AI” Friends: Designing a Social Robot for Diabetic Children from an Embodied AI Perspective

Robin is a cognitively and motivationally autonomous affective robot toddler with “robot diabetes” that we have developed to support perceived self-efficacy and emotional wellbeing in children with diabetes. Robin provides children with positive mastery experiences of diabetes management in a playful but realistic and natural interaction context. Underlying the design of Robin is...

Integrating Robot Support Functions into Varied Activities at Returning Hospital Visits

Persistent progress in the self-management of their disease is important and challenging for children with diabetes. The European ALIZ-e project developed and tested a set of core functions for a social robot that may help to establish such progress. These functions were studied in different set-ups and with different groups of children (e.g. classmates at a school, or...