Journal of Insect Behavior

http://link.springer.com/journal/10905

List of Papers (Total 28)

Predation Cues in Solitary bee Nests

Predation at the nesting site can significantly affect solitary bees’ reproductive success. We tested female red mason bees’ (Osmia bicornis L.) acceptance of potential nesting sites, some of which were marked with cues coming from predated conspecifics (crushed bees) or from a predator itself (rodent excreta). In our experiment, females did not avoid nests marked with either of ...

Parasite Lost: Chemical and Visual Cues Used by Pseudacteon in Search of Azteca instabilis

An undescribed species of phorid fly (genus: Pseudacteon) parasitizes the ant Azteca instabilis F Smith, by first locating these ants through the use of both chemical and visual cues. Experiments were performed in Chiapas, Mexico to examine a) the anatomical source of phorid attractants, b) the specific chemicals produced that attract phorids, and c) the nature of the visual cues ...

Differing Host Exploitation Efficiencies in Two Hyperparasitoids: When is a ‘Match Made in Heaven’?

Host exploitation behavior in two hyperparasitoids, Lysibia nana and Gelis agilis, was compared in single cocoon clusters of their primary parasitoid host, Cotesia glomerata. L. nana reproduces sexually, is fully winged, does not host-feed and matures eggs quite rapidly after eclosion, whereas G. agilis possesses opposite traits. Cohorts of individual hyperparasitoid females of ...

Modeling the Adaptive Role of Negative Signaling in Honey Bee Intraspecific Competition

Collective decision making in the social insects often proceeds via feedback cycles based on positive signaling. Negative signals have, however, been found in a few contexts in which costs exist for paying attention to no longer useful information. Here we incorporate new research on the specificity and context of the negative stop signal into an agent based model of honey bee ...

Does Imprecision in The Waggle Dance Fit Patterns Predicted by The Tuned-Error Hypothesis?

The waggle dance of the honey bee is used to recruit nest mates to a resource, though direction indicated for a resource may vary greatly within a single dance. Some authors suggest that this variation exits as an adaptation to distribute recruits across a patch of flowers, and that, due to the variation’s inverse relationship with distance, the shape of the recruit distribution ...

Large Numbers of Matings Give Female Field Crickets a Direct Benefit but not a Genetic Benefit

Female crickets can potentially gain both direct and indirect benefits from mating multiple times with different males. Most studies have only examined the effects of small numbers of matings, although female crickets are capable of mating many times. The goal of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect benefits of mating large numbers of times for female reproductive ...

Gender Specific Brood Cells in the Solitary Bee Colletes halophilus (Hymenoptera; Colletidae)

We studied the reproductive behaviour of the solitary bee Colletes halophilus based on the variation in cell size, larval food amount and larval sex in relation to the sexual size dimorphism in this bee. Brood cells with female larvae are larger and contain more larval food than cells with males. Occasionally males are reared in female-sized cells. We conclude that a female C. ...

Differences in Mating Propensity Between Immature Female Color Morphs in the Damselfly Ischnura elegans (Insecta: Odonata)

Female-limited color polymorphisms occur in a variety of animal taxa where excessive male sexual harassment may explain the coexistence of multiple female color morphs. In the color polymorphic damselfly Ischnura elegans, mature and immature female color morphs coexist at the mating site where males are in search for suitable mating partners. Here, we study male preference and ...

Within-Plant Migration of the Predatory Mite Typhlodromalus aripo from the Apex to the Leaves of Cassava: Response to Day–Night Cycle, Prey Location and Prey Density

Under attack by herbivores, plants produce a blend of “herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV)” that help natural enemies of herbivores locating their prey, thereby helping plants to reduce damage from herbivory. The amount of HIPV emitted by plants increases with herbivore density and is positively correlated with the intensity of the olfactory response of natural enemies. In ...

The Old Ladies of the Seed Harvester ant Pogonomyrmex Rugosus: Foraging Performed by Two Groups of Workers

We examined temporal polyethism in Pogonomyrmex rugosus, predicting a pattern of decreasing age from foragers to nest maintenance workers to individuals that were recruited to harvest a temporary food source. Nest maintenance workers were younger than foragers, as indicated by their heavier mass and lower mandibular wear. In contrast, recruited foragers were similar in mass to ...

Effects of Brood Pheromone Modulated Brood Rearing Behaviors on Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Colony Growth

A hallmark of eusociality is cooperative brood care. In most social insect systems brood rearing labor is divided between individuals working in the nest tending the queen and larvae, and foragers collecting food outside the nest. To place brood rearing division of labor within an evolutionary context, it is necessary to understand relationships between individuals in the nest ...

Aggressive and Docile Colony Defence Patterns in Apis mellifera. A Retreater–Releaser Concept

Colony defence in Apis mellifera involves a variety of traits ranging from ‘aggressive’ (e.g. entrance guarding, recruitment of flying guards) to ‘docile’ (e.g. retreating into the nest) expression. We tested 11 colonies of three subspecies (capensis, scutellata, carnica) regarding their defensiveness. Each colony was selected as reportedly ‘aggressive’, ‘intermediate’ or ‘docile’ ...

Female Oviposition Decisions and Their Impact on Progeny Life-History Traits

An important factor affecting the life-history of an organism is parental investment in reproduction: reproductive decisions are almost invariably costly. Therefore, reproductive decisions should be beneficial in terms of increased offspring number or fitness. For example, egg laying decisions in many insects can influence resource availability of the offspring through changes in ...

Local Competition Between Foraging Relatives: Growth and Survival of Bruchid Beetle Larvae

Kin selection theory states that when resources are limited and all else is equal, individuals will direct competition away from kin. However, when competition between relatives is completely local, as is the case in granivorous insects whose larval stages spend their lives within a single seed, this can reduce or even negate the kin-selected benefits. Instead, an increase in ...