Estuaries and Coasts

http://link.springer.com/journal/12237

List of Papers (Total 148)

Blooms of Dinoflagellate Mixotrophs in a Lower Chesapeake Bay Tributary: Carbon and Nitrogen Uptake over Diurnal, Seasonal, and Interannual Timescales

A multi-year study was conducted in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a sub-tributary of the lower Chesapeake Bay during which uptake of inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) and C compounds was measured during multiple seasons and years when different dinoflagellate species were dominant. Seasonal dinoflagellate blooms included a variety of mixotrophic dinoflagellates including...

Local Regime Shifts Prevent Natural Recovery and Restoration of Lost Eelgrass Beds Along the Swedish West Coast

Along the Swedish northwest coast, over 60% of the eelgrass meadows have been lost since the 1980s. Despite improved water quality, no recovery has occurred, and restoration is presently considered to mitigate historical losses. However, the factors preventing natural recovery of eelgrass are not known, and it is not clear if conditions would allow restoration. Here, we present...

Using Simple Dilution Models to Predict New Zealand Estuarine Water Quality

A tool based on simple dilution models is developed to predict potential nutrient concentrations and flushing times for New Zealand estuaries. Potential nutrient concentrations are the concentrations that would occur in the absence of nutrient uptake or losses through biogeochemical processes, and so represent the pressure on a system due to nutrient loading. The dilution...

Flood Hazard Assessment for a Hyper-Tidal Estuary as a Function of Tide-Surge-Morphology Interaction

Astronomical high tides and meteorological storm surges present a combined flood hazard to communities and infrastructure. There is a need to incorporate the impact of tide-surge interaction and the spatial and temporal variability of the combined flood hazard in flood risk assessments, especially in hyper-tidal estuaries where the consequences of tide and storm surge concurrence...

Regional Acidification Trends in Florida Shellfish Estuaries: a 20+ Year Look at pH, Oxygen, Temperature, and Salinity

Increasing global CO2 and local land use changes coupled with increased nutrient pollution are threatening estuaries worldwide. Local changes of estuarine chemistry have been documented, but regional associations and trends comparing multiple estuaries latitudinally have not been evaluated. Rapid climate change has impacted the annual and decadal chemical trends in estuaries...

Correction to: Formation Mechanism of Mud Bank Along the Southwest Coast of India

In the original article, V. Samiksha’s family name was incorrect. It is correct as reflect in this erratum. The original article has also been updated.

Phosphorus Cycling and Burial in Sediments of a Seasonally Hypoxic Marine Basin

Recycling of phosphorus (P) from sediments contributes to the development of bottom-water hypoxia in many coastal systems. Here, we present results of a year-long assessment of P dynamics in sediments of a seasonally hypoxic coastal marine basin (Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands) in 2012. Sequential phosphorus extractions (SEDEX) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicate...

Floodgate Operations and Fish Communities in Tidal Creeks of the Lower Fraser River (British Columbia, Canada)

Tidal creeks in large coastal deltas can be important habitat for fish but are often highly modified by human activities. Connectivity between tributary creeks and mainstem channels is often constrained by structures such as dikes and floodgates, designed to protect urban and agricultural areas from flooding. While they play important roles in flood mitigation, floodgates can...

Tidal Habitats Support Large Numbers of Invasive Blue Catfish in a Chesapeake Bay Subestuary

The introduction of a non-native freshwater fish, blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus, in tributaries of Chesapeake Bay resulted in the establishment of fisheries and in the expansion of the population into brackish habitats. Blue catfish are an invasive species in the Chesapeake Bay region, and efforts are underway to limit their impacts on native communities. Key characteristics of...

Quantifying Tidal Movements of the Shore Crab Carcinus maenas on to Complex Epibenthic Bivalve Habitats

Many subtidal predators undertake regular tidal migrations into intertidal areas in order to access abundant prey. One of the most productive habitats in soft bottom intertidal systems is formed by beds of epibenthic bivalves such as blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). In the Dutch Wadden Sea, these bivalves might face substantial predation...

Quantifying the Effect of Salinity Stratification on Phytoplankton Density Patterns in Estuaries

To quantify the effect of salinity stratification on phytoplankton density (denoted as P) patterns, experiments were conducted with an idealised model that couples physical and biological processes. Results show that the idealised model is capable of capturing the main features of observed P patterns in the Columbia River estuary during the spring season: during weak...

Modeling the Population Effects of Hypoxia on Atlantic Croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico: Part 2—Realistic Hypoxia and Eutrophication

Quantifying the population-level effects of hypoxia on coastal fish species has been challenging. In the companion paper (part 1), we described an individual-based population model (IBM) for Atlantic croaker in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (NWGOM) designed to quantify the long-term population responses to low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations during the summer. Here in part...

Holocene Refreshening and Reoxygenation of a Bothnian Sea Estuary Led to Enhanced Phosphorus Burial

Salinity variations in restricted basins like the Baltic Sea can alter their vulnerability to hypoxia (i.e., bottom water oxygen concentrations <2 mg/l) and can affect the burial of phosphorus (P), a key nutrient for marine organisms. We combine porewater and solid-phase geochemistry, micro-analysis of sieved sediments (including XRD and synchrotron-based XAS), and foraminiferal...

Modeling the Population Effects of Hypoxia on Atlantic Croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico: Part 1—Model Description and Idealized Hypoxia

We developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model to analyze how hypoxia effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of Atlantic croaker in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico lead to population-level responses. The model follows the hourly growth, mortality, reproduction, and movement of individuals on a 300 × 800 spatial grid of 1-km2 cells for 140 years. Chlorophyll-a...

Predicting Deep Water Intrusions to Puget Sound, WA (USA), and the Seasonal Modulation of Dissolved Oxygen

Observations and predictions regarding oceanic intrusions at the entrance to Puget Sound, WA (USA), are presented. Four years of seabed observations at Admiralty Inlet show episodic periods high salinity, coincident with landward residual currents near the seabed. The observed residual currents are consistent with an estuarine exchange flow during minimal tidal mixing, coincident...

Top-Down and Bottom-Up Interactions Influence Fledging Success at North America’s Largest Colony of Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia)

Our study investigated the influence of bottom-up and top-down drivers on the declining fledging success at a once thriving breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia). Situated at the mouth of the Columbia River, OR, East Sand Island (ESI) is home to the largest Caspian tern breeding colony in North America. Since 2001, the decline in fledging success of Caspian terns...

Long-Term Erosional Trends Along Channelized Salt Marsh Edges

Salt marshes provide important habitats for many species in the estuaries along the east and Gulf coasts of North America. With many species dependent on these coastal marshlands and extensive documentation that these marshlands are disappearing, a clear understanding of the mechanisms causing loss is critical. Much of the salt marsh was lost to reclamation and construction...

Dissolved Methane Distribution in the Reloncaví Fjord and Adjacent Marine System During Austral Winter (41°–43° S)

Within the earth’s atmosphere, methane (CH4) is one of the most important absorbers of infrared energy. It is recognized that coastal areas contribute higher amounts of CH4 emission; however, there is a lack of accurate estimates for these areas. This is particularly evident within the extensive northern fjord region of Chilean Patagonia, which has one of the highest freshwater...

Subtidal Benthic Invertebrates Shifting Northward Along the US Atlantic Coast

Numerous marine and terrestrial species have shifted their ranges poleward in response to warming from global climate change. However, few studies have examined range shifts of subtidal benthic communities in estuarine and nearshore waters. This study examined 20 years (1990–2010) of occurrence and abundance data of soft-bottom, benthic invertebrates along the Atlantic coast of...

Sulfate Reduction and Sulfur Cycles at Two Seagrass Beds Inhabited by Cold Affinity Zostera marina and Warm Affinity Halophila nipponica in Temperate Coastal Waters

To evaluate the impact of invading seagrass on biogeochemical processes associated with sulfur cycles, we investigated the geochemical properties and sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in sediments inhabited by invasive warm affinity Halophila nipponica and indigenous cold affinity Zostera marina. A more positive relationship between SRR and below-ground biomass (BGB) was observed at...

Linking the Abundance of Estuarine Fish and Crustaceans in Nearshore Waters to Shoreline Hardening and Land Cover

Human alteration of land cover (e.g., urban and agricultural land use) and shoreline hardening (e.g., bulkheading and rip rap revetment) are intensifying due to increasing human populations and sea level rise. Fishes and crustaceans that are ecologically and economically valuable to coastal systems may be affected by these changes, but direct links between these stressors and...

How Well Does Chlorophyll Explain the Seasonal Variation in Phytoplankton Activity?

The seasonal variation in phytoplankton activity is determined by analysing 1385 primary production (PP) profiles, chlorophyll a (Chl) concentration profiles and phytoplankton carbon biomass concentrations (C) from the period 1998–2012. The data was collected at six different stations in the Baltic Sea transition zone (BSTZ) which is a location with strong seasonal production...