Experimental Brain Research

http://link.springer.com/journal/221

List of Papers (Total 500)

Viewing geometry determines the contribution of binocular vision to the online control of grasping

Binocular vision is often assumed to make a specific, critical contribution to online visual control of grasping by providing precise information about the separation between digits and object. This account overlooks the ‘viewing geometry’ typically encountered in grasping, however. Separation of hand and object is rarely aligned precisely with the line of sight (the visual depth ...

The disengagement of visual attention in the gap paradigm across adolescence

Attentional disengagement is important for successful interaction with our environment. The efficiency of attentional disengagement is commonly assessed using the gap paradigm. There is, however, a sharp contrast between the number of studies applying the gap paradigm to clinical populations and the knowledge about the underlying developmental trajectory of the gap effect. The aim ...

Relative vibrotactile spatial acuity of the torso

While tactile acuity for pressure has been extensively investigated, far less is known about acuity for vibrotactile stimulation. Vibrotactile acuity is important however, as such stimulation is used in many applications, including sensory substitution devices. We tested discrimination of vibrotactile stimulation from eccentric rotating mass motors with in-plane vibration. In 3 ...

Control of wrist movement in deafferented man: evidence for a mixed strategy of position and amplitude control

There is a continuing debate about control of voluntary movement, with conflicted evidence about the balance between control of movement vectors (amplitude control) that implies knowledge of the starting position for accuracy, and equilibrium point or final position control, that is independent of the starting conditions. We tested wrist flexion and extension movements in a man ...

Perceptuo-motor planning during functional reaching after stroke

In healthy young adults, reaching movements are planned such that the initial grasp position on the object is modulated based on the final task goal. This perceptuo-motor coupling has been described as the end-state comfort effect. This study aimed to determine the extent to which visuo-perceptual and motor deficits, but not neglect, due to stroke impact end-state comfort measured ...

Dissociating the capture of attention from saccade activation by subliminal abrupt onsets

Attentional capture and effects on saccade metrics by subliminal abrupt onset cues have been studied with peripheral cues at one out of several (two to four) display locations, swiftly followed by additional onsets at the other display locations. The lead time of the cue was too short to be seen. Here, we were interested in whether such subliminal onset cues influenced saccades ...

Counting on the mental number line to make a move: sensorimotor (‘pen’) control and numerical processing

Mathematics is often conducted with a writing implement. But is there a relationship between numerical processing and sensorimotor ‘pen’ control? We asked participants to move a stylus so it crossed an unmarked line at a location specified by a symbolic number (1–9), where number colour indicated whether the line ran left–right (‘normal’) or vice versa (‘reversed’). The task could ...

Advantages of melodic over rhythmic movement sonification in bimanual motor skill learning

An important question for skill acquisition is whether and how augmented feedback can be designed to improve the learning of complex skills. Auditory information triggered by learners’ actions, movement sonification, can enhance learning of a complex bimanual coordination skill, specifically polyrhythmic bimanual shape tracing. However, it is not clear whether the coordination of ...

Differences between endogenous attention to spatial locations and sensory modalities

Vibell et al. (J Cogn Neurosci 19:109–120, 2007) reported that endogenously attending to a sensory modality (vision or touch) modulated perceptual processing, in part, by the relative speeding-up of neural activation (i.e., as a result of prior entry). However, it was unclear whether it was the fine temporal discrimination required by the temporal-order judgment task that was used, ...

Exploring the quiet eye in archery using field- and laboratory-based tasks

The ‘quiet eye’ (QE)—a period of extended gaze fixation on a target—has been reported in many tasks that require accurate aiming. Longer quiet eye durations (QEDs) are reported in experts compared to non-experts and on successful versus less successful trials. The QE has been extensively studied in the field; however, the cognitive mechanisms underlying the QE are not yet fully ...

Moving higher and higher: imitators’ movements are sensitive to observed trajectories regardless of action rationality

Humans sometimes perform actions which, at least superficially, appear suboptimal to the goal they are trying to achieve. Despite being able to identify these irrational actions from an early age, humans display a curious tendency to copy them. The current study recorded participants’ movements during an established imitation task and manipulated the rationality of the observed ...

Disturbed cervical proprioception affects perception of spatial orientation while in motion

The proprioceptive, visual and vestibular sensory systems interact to maintain dynamic stability during movement. The relative importance and interplay between these sensory systems is still not fully understood. Increased knowledge about spatial perception and postural orientation would provide better understanding of balance disorders, and their rehabilitation. Displacement of ...

Action ability modulates time-to-collision judgments

Time-to-collision (TTC) underestimation has been interpreted as an adaptive response that allows observers to have more time to engage in a defensive behaviour. This bias seems, therefore, strongly linked to action preparation. There is evidence that the observer’s physical fitness modulates the underestimation effect so that people who need more time to react (i.e. those with less ...

Kinematics in the brain: unmasking motor control strategies?

In rhythmical movement performance, our brain has to sustain movement while correcting for biological noise-induced variability. Here, we explored the functional anatomy of brain networks during voluntary rhythmical elbow flexion/extension using kinematic movement regressors in fMRI analysis to verify the interest of method to address motor control in a neurological population. We ...

Spatial limits of visuotactile interactions in the presence and absence of tactile stimulation

The presence of a light flash near to the body not only increases the ability to detect a weak touch but also increases reports of feeling a weak touch that did not occur. The somatic signal detection task (SSDT) provides a behavioural marker by which to clarify the spatial extent of such visuotactile interactions in peripersonal space. Whilst previous evidence suggests a limit to ...

Tactile feedback is an effective instrument for the training of grasping with a prosthesis at low- and medium-force levels

Grasping is a complex task routinely performed in an anticipatory (feedforward) manner, where sensory feedback is responsible for learning and updating the internal model of grasp dynamics. This study aims at evaluating whether providing a proportional tactile force feedback during the myoelectric control of a prosthesis facilitates learning a stable internal model of the ...

Trust in haptic assistance: weighting visual and haptic cues based on error history

To effectively interpret and interact with the world, humans weight redundant estimates from different sensory cues to form one coherent, integrated estimate. Recent advancements in physical assistance systems, where guiding forces are computed by an intelligent agent, enable the presentation of augmented cues. It is unknown, however, if cue weighting can be extended to augmented ...

On the contribution of overt tactile expectations to visuo-tactile interactions within the peripersonal space

Since the discovery of neural regions in the monkey brain that respond preferentially to multisensory stimuli presented in proximal space, researchers have been studying this specialised spatial representation in humans. It has been demonstrated that approaching auditory or visual stimuli modulate tactile processing, while they are within the peripersonal space (PPS). The aim of ...

Network causality, axonal computations, and Poffenberger

All brain operations are implemented by networks of neurons. Unfortunately, the networks underlying even the most elementary brain operations remain elusive. This is due to the complexity of the networks, their heterogeneity, and to the multiple computations performed by the axons. Poffenberger’s paradigm is one example of a simple task aimed at characterizing the temporal ...

The effect of gamma-enhancing binaural beats on the control of feature bindings

Binaural beats represent the auditory experience of an oscillating sound that occurs when two sounds with neighboring frequencies are presented to one’s left and right ear separately. Binaural beats have been shown to impact information processing via their putative role in increasing neural synchronization. Recent studies of feature-repetition effects demonstrated interactions ...

Experimental investigations of control principles of involuntary movement: a comprehensive review of the Kohnstamm phenomenon

The Kohnstamm phenomenon refers to the observation that if one pushes the arm hard outwards against a fixed surface for about 30 s, and then moves away from the surface and relaxes, an involuntary movement of the arm occurs, accompanied by a feeling of lightness. Central, peripheral and hybrid theories of the Kohnstamm phenomenon have been advanced. Afferent signals may be ...

Changing the size of a mirror-reflected hand moderates the experience of embodiment but not proprioceptive drift: a repeated measures study on healthy human participants

Mirror visual feedback is used for reducing pain and visually distorting the size of the reflection may improve efficacy. The findings of studies investigating size distortion are inconsistent. The influence of the size of the reflected hand on embodiment of the mirror reflection is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of magnifying and minifying mirror ...