Journal of Molecular Medicine

http://link.springer.com/journal/109

List of Papers (Total 443)

Trpc6 inactivation confers protection in a model of severe nephrosis in rats

Mutations in canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) channels give rise to rare familial forms of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here we examined a possible role for TRPC6 in the progression of chronic puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) nephrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats, a classic model of acquired nephrotic syndromes. We used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to delete...

Electron cryomicroscopy as a powerful tool in biomedical research

A human cell is a precisely regulated system that relies on the complex interaction of molecules. Structural insights into the cellular machinery at the atomic level allow us to understand the underlying regulatory mechanism and provide us with a roadmap for the development of novel drugs to fight diseases. Facilitated by recent technological breakthroughs, the Nobel prize...

The NAv1.7 blocker protoxin II reduces burn injury-induced spinal nociceptive processing

Controlling pain in burn-injured patients poses a major clinical challenge. Recent findings suggest that reducing the activity of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 in primary sensory neurons could provide improved pain control in burn-injured patients. Here, we report that partial thickness scalding-type burn injury on the rat paw upregulates Nav1.7 expression in primary...

Inducible ATF3–NFAT axis aggravates podocyte injury

Podocyte injury and loss contribute to proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and eventually kidney failure. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a stress inducible transcription factor that is transiently expressed following stimulation. However, we show for the first time an induction of ATF3 in podocytes from patients with chronic kidney disease, including minimal change...

Interplay between circadian clock and viral infection

The circadian clock underpins most physiological conditions and provides a temporal dimension to our understanding of body and tissue homeostasis. Disruptions of circadian rhythms have been associated with many diseases, including metabolic disorders and cancer. Recent literature highlights a role for the circadian clock to regulate innate and adaptive immune functions that may...

Layered defense: how mucus and tight junctions seal the intestinal barrier

The colonic mucosa provides a vital defensive barrier separating the body from the microbial populations residing in the intestinal lumen. Indeed, growing evidence shows that loss of this barrier may cause disease or exacerbate disease progression. The loss of barrier integrity increases the translocation of bacterial antigens and stimulates inflammation in the intestinal mucosa...

Epidemiology and biology of physical activity and cancer recurrence

Physical activity is emerging from epidemiologic research as a lifestyle factor that may improve survival from colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers. However, there is considerably less evidence relating physical activity to cancer recurrence and the biologic mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. Cancer patients are surviving longer than ever before, and fear...

Induced pluripotent stem cell-based modeling of neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on autophagy

The advent of cell reprogramming has enabled the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient skin fibroblasts or blood cells and their subsequent differentiation into tissue-specific cells, including neurons and glia. This approach can be used to recapitulate disease-specific phenotypes in classical cell culture paradigms and thus represents an invaluable...

The novel tool of cell reprogramming for applications in molecular medicine

Recent discoveries in the field of stem cell biology have enabled scientists to “reprogram” cells from one type to another. For example, it is now possible to place adult skin or blood cells in a dish and convert them into neurons, liver, or heart cells. It is also possible to literally “rejuvenate” adult cells by reprogramming them into embryonic-like stem cells, which in turn...

Elevated expression of CST1 promotes breast cancer progression and predicts a poor prognosis

Cystatin SN (CST1) belongs to the type 2 cystatin (CST) superfamily, which restricts the proteolytic activities of cysteine proteases. CST1 has been recently considered to be involved in the development of several human cancers. However, the prognostic significance and function of CST1 in breast cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we found that CST1 was generally...