Journal of Ornithology

http://link.springer.com/journal/10336

List of Papers (Total 227)

Indirect evidence for body size reduction in a flightless island bird after human colonisation

Rhynochetos orarius has been described from Holocene fossils as the sister species of the smaller extant Kagu Rhynochetos jubatus, a bird endemic to New Caledonia. However, we argue that there has never been evidence justifying the description of R. orarius. Additionally, for biogeographical reasons it seems unlikely that two Kagu species would have evolved in New Caledonia. We ...

Ambient temperature impacts the effect of experimental immunisation of Great Tit and Eurasian Blue Tit females on the PHA response of their offspring

The immune system is a particularly costly activity that competes with other functions of an organism, such as reproduction, although research is lacking on the importance of environmental factors for the parental investment in offspring immunity. This study examines whether ambient temperature impacts the effect of a sheep red blood cell (SRBC) challenge of the adult female’s ...

Leukocyte profiles indicate nutritional, but not moulting stress in a migratory shorebird, the Common Snipe (Gallinago gallinago)

The relative ratio of the two main leukocyte types, heterophils (H) and lymphocytes (L), is known to change proportionally to the concentrations of stress hormones in the circulating blood. Thus, analysis of leukocyte profiles serves as a reliable proxy of stress in vertebrates, as high H/L ratios indicate stronger stress response. Moult and migration are among the most ...

The importance of post-translocation monitoring of habitat use and population growth: insights from a Seychelles Warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) translocation

Translocations are a valuable tool within conservation, and when performed successfully can rescue species from extinction. However, to label a translocation a success, extensive post-translocation monitoring is required, ensuring the population is growing at the expected rate. In 2011, a habitat assessment identified Frégate Island as a suitable island to host a Seychelles Warbler ...

Hybrids and mixed pairs of Syrian and Great-spotted Woodpeckers in urban populations

The population structures of sympatric Syrian and Great-spotted Woodpeckers (SW and GW, respectively) in urban areas of Poland were investigated with respect to the occurrence of mixed pairs and hybrids. It was estimated that 5.3% of pairs were mixed and that these interspecific pairs mainly comprised SW or hybrid females and GW males. In total, 3.6% of observed individuals and ...

The breeding performance of raptors in urban landscapes: a review and meta-analysis

Global urbanisation is rapidly increasing and can have profound impacts on wild flora and fauna. For many species, the impacts are detrimental and irreversible, whereas others are able to colonise and apparently thrive in these novel, human-made environments. Raptors are particularly susceptible to changes in the environment due to their position at the end of the food chain, yet ...

Genetic confirmation of the species status of Jabouilleia naungmungensis

Species assessment of allopatric taxa is problematic. Here we consider the case of the Naung Mung Scimitar Babbler (Jabouilleia naungmungensis) from northern Myanmar. This bird was recognized as a new species in its original description, but was subsequently considered to be a subspecies of J. danjoui. We review the procedures used to make this assessment, and consider them in ...

Seasonal changes of the Hazel Grouse Tetrastes bonasia habitat requirements in managed mountain forests (Western Carpathians)

We studied the differences between spring and winter sites of Hazel Grouse Tetrastes bonasia in a managed, temperate forest in the Beskid Mountains (Western Carpathians, Poland). The study of seasonal requirements of this species in this type of habitat was innovatory. Spring territories must provide birds with appropriate conditions for breeding and winter ones must give good ...

The impact of invasive plant management on the foraging ecology of the Warbler Finch (Certhidea olivacea) and the Small Tree Finch (Camarhynchus parvulus) on Galápagos

In recent decades, arboreal Darwin’s Finches have suffered from a dramatic population decline, which has been attributed to parasitism by the invasive botfly Philornis downsi. However, changes to their primary habitat caused by invasive plant species may have additionally contributed to the observed population decline. The humid cloud forest on Santa Cruz Island is a stronghold of ...

Effects of body condition and food intake on stop-over decisions in Garden Warblers and European Robins during spring migration

During migration, birds need to optimize their time and/or energy management, especially during stop-overs. Previous studies with caged birds under controlled condition support the notion that departure decisions are condition-dependent, but they did not take into account the availability or the actual intake of food. In the study reported here we investigated whether food intake ...

Conditions at autumn stopover sites affect survival of a migratory passerine

Weather is an important factor affecting many aspects of avian ecology, yet its importance for survival during various periods of the avian annual cycle has received relatively little attention and remains poorly understood. We have investigated the effect of weather conditions at the breeding and wintering grounds and during migration on the survival probability of Eurasian Reed ...

Viability selection creates negative heterozygosity–fitness correlations in female Black Grouse Lyrurus tetrix

There is widespread interest in the relationship between individual genetic diversity and fitness–related traits (heterozygosity–fitness correlations; HFCs). Most studies have found weak continuous increases of fitness with increasing heterozygosity, while negative HFCs have rarely been reported. Negative HFCs are expected in cases of outbreeding depression, but outbreeding is rare ...

Use of anthropogenic material affects bird nest arthropod community structure: influence of urbanisation, and consequences for ectoparasites and fledging success

Nests are a critically important factor in determining the breeding success of many species of birds. Nevertheless, we have surprisingly little understanding of how the local environment helps determine the materials used in nest construction, how this differs among related species using similar nest sites, or if materials used directly or indirectly influence the numbers of ...

Cues to individual identity in songs of songbirds: testing general song characteristics in Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita

Individual variation in vocalizations has been widely studied among different animal taxa, and it is commonly reported that vocalizations could be potentially used to monitor individuals in many species. Songbirds represent a challenging group of animals for the study of signalling of individual identity. They are highly vocal, but their songs are complex and can change over time. ...

Exploring host and geographical shifts in transmission of haemosporidians in a Palaearctic passerine wintering in India

This is the first molecular study of avian haemosporidia diversity in wintering populations of the Blyth’s Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus dumetorum) in India that explores the extent of host and geographical shifts in transmission areas. In 156 birds, six Haemoproteus lineages (37.8%; 95% CI 30.41–45.82%) and one Plasmodium lineage (1.9%; 95% CI 0.053–5.6%) were recovered. Of these, ...

Microgeographic call variation in a non-learning species, the Corncrake (Crex crex)

Microgeographic variation in bird song has been studied in many species. However, it remains to be more fully described in birds that do not learn song and that thus have largely innate vocalisations. In this study, we focused on microgeographic variation in the territorial calls of one such non-learning species, the Corncrake (Crex crex). We examined the temporal and spectral ...

Egg shape in the Common Guillemot Uria aalge and Brunnich’s Guillemot U. lomvia: not a rolling matter?

The adaptive significance of avian egg shape is poorly understood, and has been studied only in those species producing pyriform (pear-shaped, or pointed) eggs: waders and guillemots (murres) Uria spp., albeit to a limited extent. In the latter, it is widely believed that the pyriform shape has evolved to minimise their likelihood of rolling off a cliff ledge: the idea being that ...

On the natural history of duetting in White-browed Coucals: sex- and body-size-dependent differences in a collective vocal display

Avian duets have long fascinated biologists, but much remains unknown about what information may be contained in these collective displays and how duet structures vary between taxa. In this study, we describe the structure and performance rules of duets in White-browed Coucals Centropus superciliosus, a tropical non-parasitic Cuckoo. We recorded vocal behaviours of 11 focal pairs ...

The effect of male incubation feeding on female nest attendance and reproductive performance in a socially monogamous bird

The incubation of eggs plays a key role in avian parental care. To ensure embryo development, incubating parents have to keep their eggs within the appropriate temperature limits. To do so, incubating individuals allocate substantial energy to the thermal demands of their eggs, but they face a trade-off with self-maintenance (own metabolism) because they usually cannot forage while ...

Behavioral and reproductive effects of bird-borne data logger attachment on Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) on three temporal scales

Although the use of bird-borne data loggers has become widespread in avian field research, the effects of capture and transmitter attachment on behavior and demographic rates are not often measured. Tag- and capture-induced effects on individual behavior, survival and reproduction may limit extrapolation of transmitter data to wider populations. However, measuring individual ...

Working with population totals in the presence of missing data comparing imputation methods in terms of bias and precision

Missing observations in water bird censuses are commonly handled using the Underhill index or the birdSTATs tool which enables the use of TRIM under the hood. Multiple imputation is a standard technique for handling missing data that is rarely used in the field of ecology, but is a well known statistical technique in the fields of medical and social sciences. The purpose of this ...

Rainfall, leafing phenology and sunrise time as potential Zeitgeber for the bimodal, dry season laying pattern of an African rain forest tit (Parus fasciiventer)

Recent studies have documented a mismatch between the phenology of leaf production, prey availability and the nestling food requirements of north temperate songbirds, attributed to climate change effects. Although tropical forest species have often been regarded as relatively aseasonal breeders, similar disruptive effects can be expected at equatorial latitudes, where comparatively ...