Cell and Tissue Research

http://link.springer.com/journal/441

List of Papers (Total 316)

Expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in the gut in Crohn’s disease

The antimicrobial glycoprotein neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is strongly expressed in several infectious, inflammatory and malignant disorders, among these inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fecal and serum NGAL is elevated during active IBD and we have recently shown that fecal NGAL is a novel biomarker for IBD with a test performance comparable to the...

Effect of TGFβ1, TGFβ3 and keratinocyte conditioned media on functional characteristics of dermal fibroblasts derived from reparative (Balb/c) and regenerative (Foxn1 deficient; nude) mouse models

Skin injuries in mammals are healed through repair or regeneration. Our previous studies demonstrated that deficient expression of the transcription factor Foxn1 in epidermis of nude mice accounts for their skin’s pronounced regenerative properties. Since homeostasis within the skin depends on complex interactions between the epidermal and underlying dermal layers, the present...

Neural crest stem cells protect spinal cord neurons from excitotoxic damage and inhibit glial activation by secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

The acute phase of spinal cord injury is characterized by excitotoxic and inflammatory events that mediate extensive neuronal loss in the gray matter. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can exert neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that may be mediated by soluble factors. We therefore hypothesize that transplantation of NCSCs to acutely injured spinal cord slice cultures...

Expression of trans-membrane serine protease 3 (TMPRSS3) in the human organ of Corti

TMPRSS3 (Trans-membrane Serine Protease 3) is a type II trans-membrane serine protease that has proteolytic activity essential for hearing. Mutations in the gene cause non-syndromic autosomal recessive deafness (DFNB8/10) in humans. Knowledge about its cellular distribution in the human inner ear may increase our understanding of its physiological role and involvement in deafness...

Metabolic implications of hypoxia and pseudohypoxia in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

Hypoxia is a critical driver of cancer pathogenesis, directly inducing malignant phenotypes such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cell-like characteristics and metabolic transformation. However, hypoxia-associated phenotypes are often observed in cancer in the absence of hypoxia, a phenotype known as pseudohypoxia, which is very well documented in specific tumour types...

The neutrophil: one cell on many missions or many cells with different agendas?

The unique role of neutrophils in host defense is not only based on their abilities to kill bacteria but is also due to their abundance in circulation and their ability to quickly migrate and accumulate in great numbers at afflicted sites. The high number of circulating neutrophils is the result of regulated release of new neutrophils from bone marrow as well as from marginated...

Earthworm coelomocyte extracellular traps: structural and functional similarities with neutrophil NETs

Invertebrate immunity is associated with natural mechanisms that include cellular and humoral elements, similar to those that play a role in vertebrate innate immune responses. Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) is a newly discovered mechanism to combat pathogens, operating not only in vertebrate leucocytes but also in invertebrate immune cells. The ET components include...

Partners in crime: neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages in inflammation and disease

Neutrophils are becoming recognized as highly versatile and sophisticated cells that display de novo synthetic capacity and potentially prolonged lifespan. Emerging concepts such as neutrophil heterogeneity and plasticity have revealed that, under pathological conditions, neutrophils may differentiate into discrete subsets defined by distinct phenotypic and functional...

Neutrophils in tissue injury and repair

As one of the first defenders of innate immune response, neutrophils make a rapid and robust response against infection or harmful agents. While traditionally regarded as suicidal killers that cause collateral tissue damage, recent findings on neutrophil extracellular trap formation, heterogeneity and plasticity and novel reparative functions have expanded our understanding of...

The genetic architecture of mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease

Mitochondrial impairment is a well-established pathological pathway implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Defects of the complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been found in post-mortem brains from sporadic PD patients. Furthermore, several disease-related genes are linked to mitochondrial pathways, such as PRKN, PINK1, DJ-1 and HTRA2 and are associated with...

A head-to-tail view of L-selectin and its impact on neutrophil behaviour

L-selectin is a type I transmembrane cell adhesion molecule expressed on most circulating leukocytes, including neutrophils. Engagement of L-selectin with endothelial-derived ligands initiates neutrophil tethering and rolling behaviour along luminal walls of post-capillary venules, constituting the first step of the multi-step adhesion cascade. There is a large body of evidence...

The LRRK2 signalling system

The LRRK2 gene is a major contributor to genetic risk for Parkinson’s disease and understanding the biology of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2, the protein product of this gene) is an important goal in Parkinson’s research. LRRK2 is a multi-domain, multi-activity enzyme and has been implicated in a wide range of signalling events within the cell. Because of the...

Mechanosensitive ion channel Piezo1 is expressed in antral G cells of murine stomach

G cells in the antrum region of the murine stomach produce gastrin, the central hormone for controlling gastric activities. Secretion of gastrin is induced mainly by protein breakdown products but also by distensions of the stomach wall. Although G cells respond to protein fragments via distinct chemosensory receptor types, the mechanism underlying G cell activation upon...

Age is the work of art? Impact of neutrophil and organism age on neutrophil extracellular trap formation

Neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs are released by highly activated neutrophils in response to infectious agents, sterile inflammation, autoimmune stimuli and cancer. In the cells, the nuclear envelop disintegrates and decondensation of chromatin occurs that depends on peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) and neutrophil elastase (NE). Subsequently, proteins from neutrophil...

Septo–hippocampal interaction

The septo–hippocampal pathway adjusts CA1 network excitability to different behavioral states and is crucially involved in theta rhythmogenesis. In the medial septum, cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons form a highly interconnected local network. Neurons of these three classes project to glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and different subsets of GABAergic neurons in...

The storage and recall of memories in the hippocampo-cortical system

A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the hippocampus as an episodic memory system is described. The CA3 system operates as a single attractor or autoassociation network (1) to enable rapid one-trial associations between any spatial location (place in rodents or spatial view in primates) and an object or reward and (2) to provide for completion of the whole...

Computational systems biology approaches for Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prime example of a complex and heterogeneous disorder, characterized by multifaceted and varied motor- and non-motor symptoms and different possible interplays of genetic and environmental risk factors. While investigations of individual PD-causing mutations and risk factors in isolation are providing important insights to improve our understanding...

Platelet–neutrophil interactions as drivers of inflammatory and thrombotic disease

Neutrophils are well known for their role in infection and inflammatory disease and are first responders at sites of infection or injury. Platelets have an established role in hemostasis and thrombosis and are first responders at sites of vascular damage. However, neutrophils are increasingly recognized for their role in thrombosis, while the immunemodulatory properties of...

Correction to: The antidepressant effect of musk in an animal model of depression: a histopathological study

The original publication of this paper contains mistake. Below you will find the needed corrections: