AoB PLANTS

https://academic.oup.com/aobpla

List of Papers (Total 259)

Seed dormancy regulates germination response to smoke and temperature in a rhizomatous evergreen perennial

Seed dormancy status regulates the response of seeds to environmental cues that can trigger germination. Anigozanthos flavidus (Haemodoraceae) produces seeds with morphophysiological dormancy (MPD) that are known to germinate in response to smoke, but embryo growth dynamics and germination traits in response to temperatures and after-ripening have not been well characterized...

The potential for phenological mismatch between a perennial herb and its ground-nesting bee pollinator

Climate change may alter the timing of flowering and pollinator activity to differing degrees, resulting in phenological mismatches between mutualistic partners. Assessing the potential for such mismatches requires an understanding of the environmental factors that cue flowering and pollinator activity. Biological context is key to determining specific impacts of climate change...

How are monospecific stands of invasive trees formed? Spatio-temporal evidence from Douglas fir invasions

Invasive plant species can produce many impacts on native communities. Impacts can be especially important when the non-natives reach high densities, producing monospecific stands where little grows besides the non-native species. We propose three basic pathways by which monospecific stands of invasive tree species are formed: (i) gradually from the propagule source, (ii) via...

Interactions between plants and soil microbes may alter the relative importance of intraspecific and interspecific plant competition in a changing climate

Interactions between plants and soil microbes play an important role in structuring terrestrial ecosystems by influencing plant growth and competitive ability. Studies have shown that abiotic conditions such as varying nutrient levels or environmental stress can alter the direction and magnitude of plant–microbe interactions. Given this context-dependency, it is possible that the...

Functional traits partially mediate the effects of chronic anthropogenic disturbance on the growth of a tropical tree

Understanding how trees mediate the effects of chronic anthropogenic disturbance is fundamental to developing forest sustainable management strategies. The role that intraspecific functional diversity plays in such process is poorly understood. Several tree species are repeatedly defoliated at large scale by cattle breeders in Africa to feed livestock. In addition, these tree...

Defence signalling marker gene responses to hormonal elicitation differ between roots and shoots

Phytohormones such as jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET) and abscisic acid (ABA) play a key role in regulation of plant immune responses to different attackers. Extensive research over recent years has led to the identification of molecular markers for specific hormonal-regulated defence pathways. However, most of our current knowledge on the regulation of...

Degradation of chlorophyll and synthesis of flavonols during autumn senescence—the story told by individual leaves

Autumn senescence of deciduous trees is characterized by chlorophyll degradation and flavonoid synthesis. In the present study, chlorophyll and flavonol contents were measured every morning and evening during the whole autumn with a non-destructive method from individual leaves of Sorbus aucuparia, Acer platanoides, Betula pendula and Prunus padus. In most of the studied trees...

Within- and trans-generational plasticity: seed germination responses to light quantity and quality

Plants respond not only to the environment in which they find themselves, but also to that of their parents. The combination of within- and trans-generational phenotypic plasticity regulates plant development. Plants use light as source of energy and also as a cue of competitive conditions, since the quality of light (ratio of red to far-red light, R:FR) indicates the presence of...

Expansive reed populations—alien invasion or disturbed wetlands?

The tall-statured grasses in the genus Phragmites are dominant vegetation in wetlands worldwide and thus play a vital role in ecosystem functioning. As a result, Phragmites spp. are some of the most widely studied plants; particularly in areas where changes to their abundances have occurred, most notably in Europe and North America. In southern Africa a pattern of reed expansion...

Genetic diversity and structure of an endangered medicinal herb: implications for conservation

Human-driven habitat fragmentation leads to spatial isolation of endangered plant species increasing extinction risk. Understanding genetic variability and population structure of rare and isolated plant species is of great importance for assessing extinction risk and setting up conservation plans. Aconitum austrokoreense, an endangered and endemic species in Korea, is a...

Facilitation influences patterns of perennial species abundance and richness in a subtropical dune system

Positive interactions in plant communities are under-reported in subtropical systems most likely because they are not identified as stressful environments. However, environmental factors or disturbance can limit plant growth in any system and lead to stressful conditions. For instance, salinity and low nutrient and water availability generate a gradient of stressful conditions in...

Geographic population structure in an outcrossing plant invasion after centuries of cultivation and recent founding events

Population structure and genetic diversity of invasions are the result of evolutionary processes such as natural selection, drift and founding events. Some invasions are also molded by specific human activities such as selection for cultivars and intentional introduction of desired phenotypes, which can lead to low genetic diversity in the resulting invasion. We investigated the...

Seed dormancy and germination vary within and among species of milkweeds

Pollinators in general and monarch butterflies in particular are in decline due to habitat loss. Efforts to restore habitats for insects that rely on specific plant groups as larvae or adults depend on the ability of practitioners to grow and produce these plants. Monarch larvae feed exclusively on milkweed species, primarily in the genus Asclepias, making propagation and...

Patterns of alternative splicing vary between species during heat stress

Plants have evolved a variety of mechanisms to respond and adapt to abiotic stress. High temperature stress induces the heat shock response. During the heat shock response a large number of genes are up-regulated, many of which code for chaperone proteins that prevent irreversible protein aggregation and cell death. However, it is clear that heat shock is not the only mechanism...

Relative contributions of hydraulic dysfunction and carbohydrate depletion during tree mortality caused by drought

Drought-induced tree mortality has been observed worldwide. Nevertheless, the physiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still being debated. Potted Robinia pseudoacacia and Platycladus orientalis saplings were subjected to drought and their hydraulic failure and carbon starvation responses were studied. They underwent simulated fast drought (FD) and slow drought (SD...

Assessing local adaptation vs. plasticity under different resource conditions in seedlings of a dominant boreal tree species

Under changing climate conditions, understanding local adaptation of plants is crucial to predicting the resilience of ecosystems. We selected black spruce (Picea mariana), the most dominant tree species in the North American boreal forest, in order to evaluate local adaptation vs. plasticity across regions experiencing some of the most extreme climate warming globally. Seeds...

Resistance of an edaphic-island specialist to anthropogenic-driven fragmentation

Fragmentation is one of the most important human-induced threats to biodiversity. Linear infrastructures, together with agriculture intensification, alter migration patterns, inducing isolation and/or affecting the connectivity between populations. The combined effect of these drivers has, as far as we know, never been explored. A population genetics approach was proposed to...

A regional assessment of white-tailed deer effects on plant invasion

Herbivores can profoundly influence plant species assembly, including plant invasion, and resulting community composition. Population increases of native herbivores, e.g. white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), combined with burgeoning plant invasions raise concerns for native plant diversity and forest regeneration. While individual researchers typically test for the impact...

Does mycorrhizal status alter herbivore-induced changes in whole-plant resource partitioning?

Both mycorrhizae and herbivore damage cause rapid changes in source–sink dynamics within a plant. Mycorrhizae create long-term sinks for carbon within the roots while damage by leaf-chewing herbivores causes temporary whole-plant shifts in carbon and nitrogen allocation. Thus, induced responses to herbivory might depend on the presence or absence of mycorrhizae. We examined the...

Intraspecific variation in response to magnitude and frequency of freeze-thaw cycles in a temperate grass

Winter warming and its accompanying predicted decrease in snow pack for northern temperate regions may increase frost damage to plants induced by an increase in freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs) due to reduced insulation. FTC frequency, minimum temperature during freezing and pre-existing local adaptations potentially all influence site-specific plant responses to future climatic changes...