Journal of Banking Regulation

http://link.springer.com/journal/41261

List of Papers (Total 41)

Dilemmas in post-crisis bank regulation: Supranationalization versus retrenchment

The US financial crisis that started in 2007 ultimately had global reach, but those countries most severely affected were the advanced industrialized states. In the United States and Europe, banks, many of which had regional or global profiles, were the source of nearly unprecedented economic instability. This special issue therefore examines the politics behind the re-regulation...

Regulation and governance in the non-bank financial sector: Lessons from New Zealand

This article uses the example of the collapse of the finance company sector in New Zealand in 2006–2010 to illustrate the problems with light touch regulation and a reliance on good governance to ensure financial stability. It shows two major governance failures, the first in the governance of the sector by the authorities and the second, serious failures in corporate governance...

NIFA-II or ‘Bretton Woods-II’?: The G-20 (Leaders) summit process on managing global financial markets and the world economy – quo vadis?

Since November 2008, there have been four historic G-20 Leaders meetings (with a fifth scheduled for Korea in November 2010), in lieu of the traditional G-8 Heads of State meeting format, to address the current Global Financial Crisis and other related economic matters of global concern. This new global governance rubric has been denominated by the G-20 Leaders (representing 80...

The myth of too big to fail

Too big to fail (TBTF) is a doctrine stipulating that big firms (particularly financial institutions) cannot be allowed to fail because of the potential adverse impact the failure may have on the rest of the sector and the economy at large. When they are in trouble, financial institutions utilise the language of fear to demand the privilege of TBTF at a significant cost to...

The promptness of European Deposit Protection Schemes to face banking failures

This article aims to investigate the efficiency of European Deposit Protection Schemes (DPSs) in providing adequate financial protection to depositors and enhancing the stability of the financial sector. Using data provided by European DPSs, the analysis focuses on different aspects of their operation. The intervention procedures in force across European Union (EU) countries are...

Failing prompt corrective action

The prompt corrective action (PCA) provisions of the 1991 Federal Deposit Insurance Improvement Act were enacted to deter future financial crises and to minimize losses to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). They have failed to do so. To determine why the article examines 50 material loss reviews made available online from 2007 through 2009 by the inspectors general...

Proposals for reforming deposit guarantee schemes in Europe

This article explores the limitations of the provision of deposit insurance in the European Union and assesses the revisions to the Directive on deposit guarantee schemes, as well as the need for further reform in the light of the financial crisis. The authors endorse a move towards a more effective European-wide institutional arrangement in line with a move towards a greater...

A simulation study on the impact of correlation between LGD and EAD on loss calculation when different LGD definitions are considered

This article examines, through a Monte Carlo simulation study, the impact of considering different Loss Given Default (LGD) definitions, as allowed by the regulation, in the accuracy of LGD calculation at portfolio level. The article suggests that the way the regulation is interpreted can have dramatic effects on LGD measurement and, consequently, on the capital that banks are...

Profit-sharing investment accounts in Islamic banks: Regulatory problems and possible solutions

As interest-bearing deposits are not permitted by the rules and principles of the Islamic Shari’ah, Islamic banks typically raise deposits in the form of profit-sharing investment accounts. These accounts differ from conventional deposits not merely by virtue of the profit-sharing nature of the returns they offer, but also because the contact between the depositors and the bank...

Bank bailout mark II: Will it work?

On 19 January 2009, the UK Government unveiled a second comprehensive bank bailout plan. This followed the failure of its October bailout package to stimulate domestic lending, as intended. The various components of the new ‘rescue package’ are duly explained and analysed in this paper, which also addresses the likely future course of policy should the Government fail in its...

Shattered on the Rock? British financial stability from 1866 to 2007

This paper provides an answer to the basic question of why in the United Kingdom the traditional techniques for the maintenance of banking stability appeared to fail in the Northern Rock episode. It also considers how the techniques may need to be changed or supplemented to prevent such problems in the future. We propose the following actions to make the banking system robust...

Stress tests and their contribution to financial stability

One of the main responsibilities of the relevant supervisory authority is to ensure a sound, stable and efficient financial system. An essential part of the stability and efficiency of a financial system depends on those same facets of the banking system, which are based on prudential regulation and effective supervision. The progressive implementation of stress tests as a tool...