Coral Reefs

http://link.springer.com/journal/338

List of Papers (Total 332)

From coral framework to rhodolith bed: sedimentary footprint of the 1982/1983 ENSO in the Galápagos

The Galápagos Islands are strongly influenced by ENSO events, and biological impacts of ENSO on the terrestrial and marine fauna are well documented. Coral reefs suffer extensively, and the 1982/1983 and 1997/1998 ENSO events caused widespread coral mortality (Glynn and Ault 2000). Of the two events, that of 1982/1983 had the most impact on Galápagos scleractinian corals (Glynn...

Zanclea–coral association: new records from Maldives

To date, few hydroids have been observed to be associated with anthozoans, and only three Pacific Zanclea species are known to live in symbiosis with scleractinian corals, namely Zanclea gilii, Z. margaritae, and Z. sango (Boero et al. 2000; Pantos and Bythell 2010; Hirose and Hirose 2011). Here, we report the first evidence of this kind of association in the Indian Ocean. During...

Toxic coral gobies reduce the feeding rate of a corallivorous butterflyfish on Acropora corals

The obligate coral-dwelling gobiid genus Gobiodon inhabits Acropora corals and has developed various physiological, morphological and ethological adaptations towards this life habit. While the advantages of this coral-fish association are well documented for Gobiodon, possible fitness-increasing factors for the host coral are unknown. This study examines the influence of coral...

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: an assessment of coral reef fishes in the US Pacific Islands

Widespread declines among many coral reef fisheries have led scientists and managers to become increasingly concerned over the extinction risk facing some species. To aid in assessing the extinction risks facing coral reef fishes, large-scale censuses of the abundance and distribution of individual species are critically important. We use fisheries-independent data collected as...

Locally accelerated growth is part of the innate immune response and repair mechanisms in reef-building corals as detected by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments

Homologs of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are a prevalent group of host pigments responsible for the green, red and purple-blue colours of many reef-building corals. They have been suggested to contribute to the striking coloration changes of different corals species in response to wounding and infestation with epibionts/parasites. In order to elucidate the physiological...