Reading or listening to review summaries - which method will produce greater understanding of the key outcomes in a cochrane review?

Trials, Nov 2015

Lisa Maguire, Mike Clarke, Mark Tully

A PDF file should load here. If you do not see its contents the file may be temporarily unavailable at the journal website or you do not have a PDF plug-in installed and enabled in your browser.

Alternatively, you can download the file locally and open with any standalone PDF reader:

http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/pdf/1745-6215-16-S2-O2.pdf

Reading or listening to review summaries - which method will produce greater understanding of the key outcomes in a cochrane review?

Maguire et al. Trials Reading or listening to review summaries - which method will produce greater understanding of the key outcomes in a cochrane review? Lisa Maguire 0 1 Mike Clarke 1 Mark Tully 1 0 University of Liverpool , Liverpool , UK 1 Queen's University Belfast , Belfast , UK © 2015 Maguire et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/ zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. - From 3rd International Clinical Trials Methodology Conference Glasgow, UK. 16-17 November 2015 Background Systematic reviews are key to the dissemination of the findings of clinical trials and many readers might access nothing more than a summary of these reviews. Therefore, it is essential that these summaries are clear, understandable and accessible. We explored whether readers understand key messages without having to read the full review, and if there were differences in understanding between various types of summary, including an audio podcast. 1. Workplace interventions for reducing sitting at work 2. Chewing gum for postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal function 3. Surgery for weight loss in adults 4. Dance movement therapy for depression Potential participants were contacted via University and organisational mailing lists. Those who wished to take part were asked to select one of the four reviews. After answering a question about what they thought the key finding of the review would be, they were randomly assigned one of four summaries of the review: abstract, plain language summary, audio podcast or transcript of the podcast. They were asked to spend no more than 15 minutes reading or listening to the summary, before answering again the question about the key findings and to indicate whether they would now want to read the full Cochrane Review. 1Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK Full list of author information is available at the end of the article Submit your next manuscript to BioMed Central and take full advantage of: Submit your manuscript at www.biomedcentral.com/submit


This is a preview of a remote PDF: http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/pdf/1745-6215-16-S2-O2.pdf

Lisa Maguire, Mike Clarke, Mark Tully. Reading or listening to review summaries - which method will produce greater understanding of the key outcomes in a cochrane review?, Trials, 2015, O2,