Conversion of various types of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars using kraft pulping and enzymatic hydrolysis

Wood Science and Technology, May 2017

The aim of this work was to assess the utility of seven different kraft pulps produced from softwood (pine), hardwood (poplar, birch and beech), wheat straw and hemp (bast and harl) as potential sources of sugar feedstocks for fermentation processes. The pulps contained low amounts of hemicelluloses (1.9–8.2% d.w.) and lignin (1.7–15% d.w.). The crystallinity index values ranged from 55% (wheat straw pulp) to 79% (hemp bast pulp), while the average DP varied from around 230 (hemp bast pulp) to 1482 (poplar and birch pulps). The results of enzymatic hydrolysis showed that not only the residual lignin content but also the cellulose crystallinity index decided on the sugar yields while the average polymerization degree had a weak impact. More reducing sugars were obtained from the hardwood pulps and wheat straw pulp (100% d.w.) than from the pine pulp (around 89% d.w.) and two hemp pulps (40.5% d.w. and 44.7% d.w. from the bast and harl pulps, respectively). Glucose was the dominating (69–79% w/w) soluble sugar in enzymatic hydrolysates of the pulps. The sugar profiles of these hydrolysates make them suitable sugar feedstocks for fermentation processes.

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Conversion of various types of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars using kraft pulping and enzymatic hydrolysis

The aim of this work was to assess the utility of seven different kraft pulps produced from softwood (pine), hardwood (poplar, birch and beech), wheat straw and hemp (bast and harl) as potential sources of sugar feedstocks for fermentation processes. The pulps contained low amounts of hemicelluloses (1.9–8.2% d.w.) and lignin (1.7–15% d.w.). The crystallinity index values ranged from 55% (wheat straw pulp) to 79% (hemp bast pulp), while the average DP varied from around 230 (hemp bast pulp) to 1482 (poplar and birch pulps). The results of enzymatic hydrolysis showed that not only the residual lignin content but also the cellulose crystallinity index decided on the sugar yields while the average polymerization degree had a weak impact. More reducing sugars were obtained from the hardwood pulps and wheat straw pulp (100% d.w.) than from the pine pulp (around 89% d.w.) and two hemp pulps (40.5% d.w. and 44.7% d.w. from the bast and harl pulps, respectively). Glucose was the dominating (69–79% w/w) soluble sugar in enzymatic hydrolysates of the pulps. The sugar profiles of these hydrolysates make them suitable sugar feedstocks for fermentation processes.


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Kamila Przybysz Buzała, Halina Kalinowska, Piotr Przybysz, Edyta Małachowska. Conversion of various types of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars using kraft pulping and enzymatic hydrolysis, Wood Science and Technology, 2017, 873-885, DOI: 10.1007/s00226-017-0916-7