Influence of milk. levels of beef cows on returns:a simulation approach

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports, Dec 1989

Results of four simulated production systems indicated that high levels of milk produced calves that were heavier at weaning, primarily because of an increase in body fat. High levels of milk production, however, were a disadvantage when calves went directly to the feedlot. With slow-growing calves, the fat either had to be depleted postweaning, or the calves had to be slaughtered at less-than-desirable weights in order to maintain desirable carcass fat. High milk intake is more tolerable for calves with fast growth rates, whereas low milk intake is a an economic necessity for calves with slow growth rates. The moderate size (1250 lbs), moderate milking (average of 16.6 lbs per day) cows produced the greatest return over feed cost.

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Influence of milk. levels of beef cows on returns:a simulation approach

Influence of milk . levels of beef cows on returns:a simulation approach R.R. Schalles L.S. Clarke Follow this and additional works at: http://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr Part of the Other Animal Sciences Commons Recommended Citation Schalles, R.R.; Zoellner, K.O.; and Clarke, L.S. (1989) "Influence of milk. levels of beef cows on returns:a simulation approach," Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports: Vol. 0: Iss. 1. https://doi.org/10.4148/2378-5977.2247 - Thi s report is brought to you for free and open access by New Prairie Press. It has been accepted for inclusion in Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports by an authorized administrator of New Prairie Press. Copyright 1989 Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. Contents of this publication may be freely reproduced for educational purposes. All other rights reserved. Brand names appearing in this publication are for product identification purposes only. K-State Research and Extension is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Influence of milk. levels of beef cows on returns:a simulation approach Abstract Results of four simulated production systems indicated that high levels of milk produced calves that were heavier at weaning, primarily because of an increase in body fat. High levels of milk production, however, were a disadvantage when calves went directly to the feedlot. With slow-growing calves, the fat either had to be depleted postweaning, or the calves had to be slaughtered at less-than-desirable weights in order to maintain desirable carcass fat. High milk intake is more tolerable for calves with fast growth rates, whereas low milk intake is a an economic necessity for calves with slow growth rates. The mode rate size (1250 lbs), moderate milking (average of 16.6 lbs per day) cows produced the greatest return over feed cost. Creative Commons License Thi s work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License. Thi s Research Report article is available in Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports: http://newprairiepress.org/ kaesrr/vol0/iss1/844


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R.R. Schalles, K.O. Zoellner, L.S. Clarke. Influence of milk. levels of beef cows on returns:a simulation approach, Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports, 1989,