Dec. 1999

NASIG Newsletter, Dec 1999

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Dec. 1999

0892-1733 NASIG AWARDS December 1999 TABLE OF CONTENTS PRESIDENT’S CORNER NASIG 15TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ( 2000 ) CPC UPDATE PROGRAM PLANNING UPDATE NASIG 14TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE (1999) ISSUE SESSION EVALUATION REPORT TREASURER’S REPORT HORIZON AWARD FRITZ SCHWARTZ SCHOLARSHIP CONFERENCE STUDENT GRANT NASIG PROFILES NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS REGIONAL COUNCILS & MEMBERSHIP TITLE CHANGES OTHER SERIAL NEWS UKSG/NASIG: A GOOD NATURED 1 PRESIDENT’S CORNER Dan Tonkery, NASIG President MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT... It has now been four months since I took over the reigns from the talented and kilt-wearing Steve Oberg as President of NASIG and even with my increased volume of e-mail I am happy to report that everything is going fine at this point. The Board has just returned from San Diego where we held our fall Board meeting, which is always held on the campus of the upcoming annual conference. The full Board spent two days on the campus at University of California, San Diego. While we were there to conduct NASIG business, we also took time to have an extensive walk through the campus to view the meeting rooms, the quality of the dorms, the food service, and the evening events. Your Board had a dry run on the campus trying to anticipate and resolve problems before the full 700 attendees arrive for the conference. This is a process that we use each and every year to try to minimize any problems that might arise at the annual meeting. While the full Board goes through the campus at this time, remember a site selection team has gone through the year before and made an assessment of the campus environment. The NASIG Board makes a serious effort to find campuses that are exciting and offer some regional differences with activities that are rewarding. And the envelope please.... Well the evaluations are in from the Pittsburgh meeting and while the program got high marks for quality and diversity, the campus took some heavy blows due to the weather and the quality of the dorms. Please understand that we hold our meetings on campus to enable our members and guest to have an educational experience at an affordable price. That being said, I still believe that COMPARISON SCHOLARLY MEETING IN MEXICO CITY 17 IN MEMORIAM: PETER GELLATLY 18 CALENDAR the weather was our worst enemy: the heat wave made all of us uncomfortable. No one predicted the weather, and we were not prepared for the toll the heat took on anyone that stayed in an unair-conditioned dorm. Worst of all was the evaluation that your NASIG Board was unsympathetic to your situation. If we as a Board have given anyone that impression, please accept our apology. We visited the campus in November when the heat was not a problem and had an extensive tour of campus including the dorm rooms. We only saw a sample of the dorms and had no affordable way to prepare for a heat wave. We tried to get fans for everyone, but the supply ran out as well. I can only say that future site planning teams will have to look much more carefully at the campus conditions and try to model the weather better for the actual meeting locations. Again the NASIG Board and I, as President, want you all to understand that we take our responsibility NASIG NEWSLETTER The NASIG Newsletter (ISSN: 0892-1733) is published 4 times per year for the members of the North American Serials Interest Group, Inc. It is available through personal membership in the organization, or by subscription for $35 per year in the U.S.; $45 per year outside the U.S. NASIG NEWSLETTER COPYRIGHT STATEMENT The NASIG Newsletter is copyright by the North American Serials Interest Group and NASIG encourages its widest use. In accordance with the U.S. Copyright Act’s Fair Use provisions, readers may make a single copy of any of the work for reading, education, study, or research purposes. In addition, NASIG permits copying and circulation in any manner, provided that such circulation is done for free and the items are not re-sold in any way, whether for-profit or not-for-profit. Any reproduction for sale may only be done with the permission of the NASIG Board, with a request submitted to the current President of NASIG, under terms which will be set by the Board. NASIG addresses: 2103 N. Decatur Rd., No. 214 Decatur, GA 30033 URL: http://nasig.org seriously: we want to apologize to everyone who was inconvenienced in any way at Pittsburgh. We planned and planned and in the end there were some shortcomings, which could have been prevented. We will try harder in the future to prevent a repeat of the problems that impacted so many of you. On to San Diego for June 2000... At the fall Board meeting we had reports from both Conference Planning and Program Planning; the committees are working hard to make the annual meeting in 2000 a memorable event. First the dorms are excellent, and the weather should be great as well. The events that are planned include the Birch Aquarium, which overlooks the ocean and is a great location for a reception as is the San Diego Zoo. The Board has reviewed the recommendations from the CPC and has set the rates for the meeting. To check on the registration prices look at the NASIG Web site. We will be supporting online registration in the spring when the conference is ready for registration. The Program Planning Committee has been equally involved in putting together a blockbuster of a program. The workshops all look great, and this year we are going to be trying something new with poster sessions. Look for an announcement for poster sessions later this fall. So what else happened at the fall Board meeting... The Board approved the budget for 2000 and went through the standing committee reports. We have had Bylaw activity, an active Awards & Recognition Committee program this fall according to Markel Tumlin and Pat Frade with the Student Grant, Horizon, Fritz, and Tuttle Awards. All of the Committees have been involved in a variety of activities. We have just participated in two meetings in Mexico, where the Continuing Education Committee helped sponsor speakers. Included meetings were “En Linea 99” in Monterrey and the “Cycle of Conferences on Academic & Research Journals” in Mexico City where the earth moved for President-Elect Connie Foster, who was giving a paper when the earthquake hit that area. Another exciting report came from Beth Toren, the Chair of the ECC's NASIGWeb Task Force on the NASIG Web site revision. Our current Web site has been up for several years, and now we have a Task Force chaired by Beth to make a major overhaul in the functionality and in the look and feel of the site. I am happy to report that the new design that Beth and her Task Force members demonstrated was bold and dynamic. Everyone on the Board came away with a sense of innovation at an impressive new design. We should see the new site in its fullness by the first of the year. Moving on to the year 2000... The year 2000 is going to continue bringing the sea of change. Mergers and acquisitions, which have kept us updating files and filled the e-mails with gossip in the publishing world, have now taken a hold of the subscription vendors as well. In our small world the merger of Blackwell and Swets is going to be a major change in our marketplace, as will be the more recent acquisition by Rowecom of Dawson Information Services, which includes Information Quest and the former Faxon. Academic librarians in technical services will be starting the coming year with a new set of book vendor owners and a revised set of subscription agents plus increased emphasis at the local level for desktop delivery of ejournals. The faculty acceptance of e-journals delivered to the desktop is like a raging fire spreading across the academic world. Everyone wants access to the journals in their discipline in electronic form. Not only are we facing the pressure of e-journals but also the rise in preprint services. The coming changes in scholarly communication with PubMedCentral and other preprint services will profoundly impact the world of every serials librarian. NASIG is well situated to be one of the continuing education opportunities to keep up with the pending changes in our industry. The NASIG annual conference workshops and programs are an excellent place to keep up with the changes that are impacting our serials world. Come to San Diego in June and find out what changes are in store for all of us. As we bring to close the year, I hope that you and your family will have a happy and safe holiday season and that we all look to the year 2000 with hope and peace and good health to all. Until then...good fortune to all! HOPE TO SEE YOU IN SAN DIEGO! Karen Cargille, CPC Chair The NASIG Conference Planning committee for NASIG 2000 in San Diego is hard at work preparing for our first conference of the new century, June 22-25, 2000. Since UCSD's graduation is on June 18, only a limited number of apartments will be available before the conference; however, we will be able to offer add-on days after the conference for those members who want to extend their stay in San Diego. Rates for rooms (without meals) following the conference will be $47 per night for a single room and $37 per night for a double room. There are also three hotels very conveniently located to the campus; the La Jolla Radisson, the Residence Inn La Jolla, and the Hilton-La Jolla Torrey Pines. All of these hotels are about a 20 minute walk to the UCSD Price Center, which will serve as our primary location for the conference. In addition there are many other hotels a short drive from campus for those attendees who choose to rent cars; a list will be provided in the conference brochure. San Diego is served by most major airlines at its downtown Lindbergh Field airport. Quite an exciting place to land if you've never been here. The campus is about a 20 minute shuttle ride north of downtown, unless you arrive in rush hour. As the time gets closer we will inform you of specifics about shuttle service to UCSD. The University of California, San Diego is located very near the Pacific Ocean in the northern part of the City of San Diego in the community of La Jolla. Despite the beautiful summer-like 90 degree weather that the Board just experienced, the weather in June should be our famous "June gloom". This means morning fog burning off around 10:30 to sun until around 3:00 when the fog will again roll in. Temperatures will be in the 50's and 60's, so bring a jacket, but probably not a raincoat or umbrella (even though it will look like rain in the morning to many of you). Some special events have already been planned. On Thursday night we will have our opening night reception at the Birch Aquarium of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography on the UCSD campus. The Aquarium and its Museum will be open only for our group. We are also negotiating for the bookstore and gift shop to remain open at least for part of the evening. On Saturday night we have arranged for a Zoofari Party at the San Diego Zoo. This is the first Saturday that the Zoo will be open until 10pm for the public, so our group will have time to view the Zoo at our leisure following our event. On Friday Night we are working on a menu of optional events for you to choose. Such things as a Dinner Cruise in San Diego Harbor, Sea World, a trip to the Viejas Indian Gaming Casino, and a night on the town in San Diego's Gaslamp are the current choices for Friday. As you have probably read on NASIG-L and NASIGNET, registration costs must be raised this year. We will be charging the following: Single rooms: $450 Double rooms $425 Commuters $300 The Conference Planning Committee is very excited about this conference. We know you will love our oncampus apartments and our great events, as well as the terrific program being planned by the Program Planning Committee. Mark your calendars and plan to join us in San Diego next June. PROGRAM PLANNING UPDATE Susan Davis, Cindy Hepfer, and Mary Page, PPC Co-Chairs Shortly after the conference at Pittsburgh ended this past June, we began working on the schedule for the 2000 conference at the University of California, San Diego. One of our first tasks was to review a compilation of comments from attendees about their Pittsburgh experiences. With this valuable feedback from the most recent conference in mind, the Committee began an online dialogue about the schedule for the San Diego meeting. The Chair of the Conference Planning Committee, Karen Cargille, and UCSD's Crystal Graham provided us with valuable information about the site, the available rooms and their sizes, and the distance between locations We received seventy proposals in response to our call for papers. The proposals were distributed to the Committee during the late summer, and discussion about program possibilities began in earnest at that point. Overall, we are very pleased with the number and quality of the proposals submitted. The schedule we developed, and which the Board at their October meeting approved, provides attendees with a familiar NASIG format, yet has a few innovations that we believe will be well received. The schedule we are currently working: • has a regular breakfast time each day • allows 1.25 hours for each workshop and concurrent session • schedules the networking nodes at the end of the day on Friday, retaining a full 1.5 hours for these sessions. • provides attendees with the option on Saturday afternoon to select one longer workshop with a break midway or two shorter workshops • includes user group meetings at the traditional noconflict time on Sunday at the end of the conference, ending in time to allow attendees to participate in tour offerings Shortening the workshops and concurrent sessions by fifteen minutes allows a more relaxed approach to the entire conference. Attendees will have time mid-day to network, return to their room for a brief siesta, view the poster sessions, attend a committee meeting, check email, call home, etc. We believe that this small change will address the frequently heard complaint about the lack of free time during previous conferences. We have retained the full one and a half hours for the networking nodes, because these sessions are a time for attendees to ask each other questions about practices and policies, exchange information and tips, and genuinely participate in a discussion of their choice. We are currently working on the final selection of programs for the conference, a difficult task given the high quality of the submissions. It looks as though we will have three pre-conferences to offer NASIG attendees, and our "short list" of potential plenary speakers is very exciting. This year, we will have posters sessions on the program as well; a call for proposals for poster sessions will go out early in 2000. The site at UCSD is fabulous, and we are confident that the program will be superb this year. Watch for the conference program announcement later this winter, which will contain all the details. The Program Planning Committee for the NASIG 2000 Annual Conference at San Diego consists of Co-Chairs Susan Davis, Cindy Hepfer, and Mary Page; Board Liaison Connie Foster, Consultant Crystal Graham, and members of two subcommittees. Members of the Workshops Subcommittee are Wendy Baia, Susan Davis, Christie Degener, Marty Gordon, Alison Roth, and Allison Sleeman; members of the Plenary/Concurrents Subcommittee are Cindy Hepfer, Sandra Hurd, Judy Luther, Joyce McDonough, Joyce Ogburn, Mary Page, and Kay Teel. NASIG 14TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE (1999) ISSUES SESSIONS [Ed. note: This is the final conference report for this year.] 2.3 Breaking the Database Barrier: Multi-Disciplinary Searching and Access to Full Content on the Web Peter Ciuffetti, President, KnowledgeCite, Inc.; Raymond Daley, Lexis-Nexis. Reported by Marguerite Horn Peter Ciuffetti began his demonstration in dramatic fashion as he unrolled a 30-page print of a single Web page of databases from an academic library. His point: how can anyone find what he/she is looking for in an alphabetic list of this type? Because of the explosion in electronic resources, a new way of approaching information organization is needed. Ciuffetti calls this approach “knowledge integration;” it would provide an intersection between librarianship and the Web. He then described multi-disciplinary digital libraries that would provide one search engine for multiple resources. Currently, when a patron is researching a topic, he/she needs to decide first which database is the correct one to search. Ciuffetti suggests that this approach should be turned around. KnowledgeCite is developing a method for searching multiple databases with a single search engine. A student would just approach the “database,” construct the search, and the search would be carried out simultaneously in, for example, Agricola, Biological Abstracts, PAIS International, Social Science Abstracts, etc. The student would be returned results that might come from any database. The citation is the important result, not the database from which it was extracted. In developing KnowledgeCite, there are three technical issues to be overcome. First, there is overlap in databases: item overlap and concept overlap. Second, there is the issue of scale: this requires relevance ranking and limiting capabilities. Third, there is the issue of subject headings: LCSH is used as the glue for discipline-specific vocabularies, but there are other thesauri being used. As these problems are solved, the goal of knowledge integration can be realized. Raymond Daley followed with an overview of how the Lexis-Nexis database is created. The database consists of documents, which are the core components of a digital library. Documents are articles, memos, abstracts, driver’s licenses, etc. They are containers that we can standardize, structure, analyze, and enhance. It is important that document structure be standardized across databases; standardization is done by use of metadata to describe content and metastructures to control presentation. Daley then gave a thorough tour of the basic documentation preparation for Lexis-Nexis. This included collection of the data (ranging from electronic feeds to actual typing); conversion of the data to standard forms and marking it up; editing; updating files; and creating the search parameters. The editing function involves creating core terms, core citations, summaries, and linking features. The metastructure which is created includes creating menus (based on the “entitlement of the user”), tables of contents, pick lists, and precedence networks. Daley also mentioned using metadata to resolve the “source selection barriers,” the same problem KnowledgeCite is working to overcome. CONFERENCE EVALUATION REPORT NASIG Evaluation and Assessment Committee Many thanks to the 316 respondents who completed the evaluation form. This represents an increase over the number who completed the form last year [294]. Overall, the conference this year in Pittsburgh was rated 3.9 on a scale of 1 to 5 [with 5 being the highest]. This is lower than recent conferences [1998: 4.4, and 1997: 4.3]. Once again a high percentage of respondents were from university and college libraries [60%]; 4.9% represented medical libraries; 5.6% were from subscription agents; 2.2% represented the publishing community; 2.5% were from corporate/special libraries; and 3.4% were from law libraries or library networks/consortia/ utilities. The 1.9% public library respondents fell slightly from the 2.4% in 1998. No doubt, this NASIG group was an experienced one with 53% having over 10 years of serials experience, while only 4.3% had less than 1 year. Over 20% of those responding were NASIG first timers, while an additional 48% had attended 1-5 previous conferences. Respondents wear many “hats” with regard to work responsibilities as many needed to mark more than one category to describe their work: serials librarian: 54%; catalog librarian: 32%; acquisitions librarian: 28%; processing or binding: 20%; and reference librarian: 18%. These percentages rate favorably with past conferences. NASIG attendees are traditionally willing commentators when asked to do so, and this year was no exception as this conference elicited many comments. Social events/entertainment rated highly at 4.4 while the geographic location rated 4.0. Many people commented on the boat ride with kudos to the baseball team for having fireworks just for our benefit. Housing [2.7], meeting rooms [3.2], and meals [3.5] rated lower than recent conferences, with a heat wave contributing to numerous problems. Overall, the workshops, issues, and plenary sessions were rated similarly as 2 of 3 plenaries received ratings between 4.3-4.6, and 15 of 22 workshops had ratings of 3.8 or higher. The two most highly rated workshops were "Realistic licensing or licensing realities: practical advice on license agreements," and "AACR2 and you: a report on the recommendations to the JSC." Issues sessions rated consistently with 9 of 12 sessions receiving ratings of 3.9 or higher. Many topics were suggested for future workshops with metadata as a frequent choice. As usual many future conference sites were suggested with the Pacific Northwest and anywhere “not hot” as popular suggestions. Evaluation and Assessment Committee members produced the evaluation form. The Committee is always interested in hearing feedback about the conferences and about the form itself. All suggestions are forwarded to the appropriate Board and/or committee members in an attempt to improve NASIG conferences and activities year-to-year. Members of the Evaluation and Assessment Committee are: Jennifer Marill (Chair), June Chressanthis, Diane Grover, Janice Lindquist, Patricia Phillips, Kristine Smets, Joan Stephens, David Winchester, and Carol Pitts Diedrichs, Board Liaison. ______________________________________________ TREASURER'S UPDATE OCTOBER 1999 Gerry Williams, NASIG Treasurer NASIG currently has $115,764 in assets. This includes $57,252 in bank balances and $58,512 in an investment bond account. NASIG has expended $61,138 on the year round operations. This includes all the committee activity such as the Directory, Newsletter, Awards & Recognition, and Continuing Education. The 1999 Pittsburgh Conference currently shows a loss of $5,249. This should be the final figure unless we have late expenses. 2000 NASIG HORIZON AWARD The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) is currently seeking candidates for grants to attend the Fifteenth Annual Conference to be held at University of California, San Diego June 22-25, 2000. NASIG is an international organization committed to promoting communication and sharing of ideas among all people working with or concerned about serial publications. DESCRIPTION OF AWARD: The purpose of the NASIG Horizon Award is to advance the serials profession by providing promising new serialists with the opportunity to accelerate their knowledge and understanding of serials by networking and interacting with a wide range of dedicated professionals working in all segments of the serials information chain. The award provides the recipient(s) with a firsthand introduction to NASIG by sponsoring attendance at the NASIG annual conference. NASIG will pay for all conference registration, housing, and travel costs. In addition, the recipient(s) will receive a year’s free membership in NASIG and will be invited to serve on a NASIG committee the year following the award. A maximum of two awards per year is given. ELIGIBILITY: Applicants must currently be in a position of a professional nature with primary responsibilities for some aspect of serials, e.g. head of serials, serials acquisitions, serials vendor, serials publisher. Applicants must have served in this position for no more than three years at the time of the application deadline and must not have been in a professional library or library-related position (e.g. book vendor, publisher) for more than five years at the time of the application deadline. Applicants must not have attended any previous NASIG conferences. Applicants do not have to be members of NASIG. Preference will be given to applicants employed by a North American organization or institution and to those whose career goals include professional growth and development in serials. For applications or further information contact: Pat Frade Co-Chair, NASIG Awards & Recognition Committee Serials Cataloger 6380 Harold B. Lee Library Brigham Young University Provo, UT 84602 Phone: (801) 378-6730 Fax: (801) 378-3221 or: (801) 378-6708 E-mail: Applications must be accompanied by a letter of reference from a current supervisor and a current resume or curriculum vita. Completed applications should be returned to Pat Frade as above. APPLICATION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 16, 2000 Applications postmarked after this date will NOT be considered. Fax submissions are acceptable. AWARD NOTIFICATION: The award recipients shall be notified by April 1, 2000. NEW MILLENIUM, NEW SITE DESIGN The Electronic Communications Committee is pleased to announce the launching of the newly redesigned NASIGWeb in January 2000. Look for a link to a preview of the site to be made available shortly after the first of next year, just in time for the new millenium! http://www.nasig.org FRITZ SCHWARTZ SERIALS EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP SPONSORED BY NASIG AND SISAC The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) and the Serials Industry Systems Advisory Committee (SISAC) team up each year to award a $2500 scholarship to a library science graduate student who demonstrates excellence in scholarship and the potential for accomplishment in a serials career. The purpose of the scholarship is to advance the serials profession by providing an aspiring library student who has prior serials experience with enhanced educational opportunities. The award is named in honor of Fritz Schwartz, who was a well-known and highly respected authority on Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), the Internet, and library standards. A frequent speaker at NASIG annual conferences, his last NASIG appearance was to conduct a highly rated workshop at the 10th Conference at Duke University. He actively participated in various committees within SISAC, the National Information Standards Organization (NISO), and the International Committee on EDI for Serials (ICEDIS). At the time of his death, Fritz was Manager of Electronic Services and Standards at the Faxon Company. NASIG and SISAC are pleased to offer this scholarship in memory of Fritz's many contributions to the library profession and to honor his energy, warmth, humor, and passion for standards. SISAC provides a forum for professionals throughout the entire serials chain to work together in developing standardized formats with which to electronically transmit serials information. More information about SISAC is available at: http://www.bookwire.com/bisg/sisac.html. In addition to the scholarship, the recipient will also receive a Student Grant Award to attend the NASIG conference for the year in which the scholarship is granted and will receive a one-year NASIG membership. The 2000 NASIG conference will be held at the University of California, San Diego June 22nd-25th. ELIGIBILITY: At the time the scholarship is awarded, the applicant must be entering an ALA- accredited graduate library program or must have completed no more than twelve hours of academic requirements towards the graduate degree. The applicant must have serials-related work experience and a desire to pursue a professional serials career after earning the Graduate library degree. The following materials are required by the applicant and must be postmarked/faxed by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. (Applications postmarked/faxed after this date will not be considered): * A completed application form. * Letters of reference from two information professionals. * A resume or curriculum vita. * A statement of the applicant's career objectives (not to exceed 250 words). * A statement on how the applicant's qualifications satisfy the eligibility requirements and the purpose of the award (not to exceed 250 words). The award winner will be required to be enrolled for a minimum of six credit hours of library/information science courses per semester/quarter during the academic year that the award is granted. The award winner will be ineligible to reapply for the scholarship. Only one scholarship will be awarded per academic year. Application forms will be available after November 15, 1999 in ALA accredited library schools, through the NASIG Web Page, in this issue of the NASIG Newsletter, and from Markel Tumlin, Co-Chair, Awards and Recognition Committee. Completed applications and all related materials should be sent to: Markel Tumlin, Co-Chair, NASIG Awards & Recognition Committee General Reference Division University Library, LLA 1101-L San Diego State University 5500 Campanile Drive San Diego, CA 92182-8050 Phone: (619) 594-6875 Fax: (619) 594-3270 E-mail: 2000 NASIG CONFERENCE STUDENT GRANT ANNOUNCEMENT The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) is currently seeking candidates for grants to attend the Fifteenth Annual Conference to be held at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on June 22-25, 2000 Through the granting of these awards, NASIG desires to encourage participation in this information chain by students who are interested in pursuing some aspect of serials work upon completion of their professional degrees. Each June the annual conference is held on a different college or university campus, where the various segments of the serials community (including publishers, vendors, and librarians) meet in an informal setting to network and share information. The conference includes the presentation of papers, panels, workshops, tours, and social events. SCOPE OF AWARD: Recipients are expected to attend the entire conference and submit a brief written report to NASIG, which will be excerpted, for publication in the NASIG Newsletter. Expenses for travel, registration, meals, and lodging will be paid by NASIG. Each recipient will also receive a year's membership in NASIG. ELIGIBILITY: Students who are currently enrolled at the graduate level in any ALA accredited library school, who do not already have an ALA accredited degree, and who have expressed an interest in some aspect of serials work, are eligible. Applicants must be full- or part-time students at the time of application. In order to accept an award, a recipient must not be employed in a position requiring an ALA accredited degree, nor on leave from such a position, at the time of acceptance of the grant. Equal consideration will be given to all qualified applicants, with preference given to those earning their degrees the year of the conference. Students do not have to be NASIG members to apply, and they must not have earned their degrees earlier than the end of the school year prior to the NASIG conference. Applicants must not have attended a previous NASIG conference. APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Application forms will be available after November 15, 1999, in ALA accredited library schools, through the NASIG Web Page, in this issue of the NASIG Newsletter, and from Markel Tumlin, Co-Chair, Awards and Recognition Committee. Completed applications should be sent to: Markel Tumlin General Reference Division University Library, LLA 1101-L San Diego State University 5500 Camponile Drive San Diego, CA 92182-8050 Phone: (619) 594-6875 Fax: (619) 594-3270 E-Mail: APPLICATION DEADLINE: Applications must be postmarked/faxed by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Applications postmarked/faxed after this date will not be considered. AWARD NOTIFICATION: Award recipients will be notified by April 1, 2000. A maximum of ten grants may be awarded for 2000. FREQUENCY CHANGE! Beginning with the first issue of 2000, the NASIG Newsletter will simplify its publication frequency. The new pattern will be quarterly, published in the last month of each quarter: March June September December The odd, fifth issue during each of the past years primarily consisted of the annual conference brochure, which is routinely produced and mailed separately to the entire NASIG membership and others. This duplication is being eliminated, thus negating the need for the February issue. NASIG PROFILES Naomi Young NOMINATIONS & ELECTIONS COMMITTEE Elections without campaign funds, extravagant promises, or hints of corruption? Slates of nominees selected for their qualifications and balance? Is this all a vain dream? Not when we are discussing NASIG elections. When I first set out to interview the Nominations & Elections Committee Chair, Sharon Cline McKay, I thought the main job of the Committee was simply to send out the ballots and then count them. But there is much more to the Committee’s work than that. Posting the call for nominees and collecting the results are only the beginning. Once the call for nominations is completed, the Committee first verifies that all potential nominees are eligible: that they are members in good standing and do not violate any restrictions on number of years consecutively served. They make certain those nominated are willing to serve. Then the Committee requires the potential nominees to fill out an extensive profile detailing their prior professional activities and NASIG involvement. “Even the people who are not ultimately chosen have put in a great deal of personal time and effort, and we should all be grateful to them for their willingness to contribute,” said McKay. The Committee members use this information to begin a private e-mail discussion to evaluate which candidates are best qualified to run for office for the coming year. This is primarily done through discussion on the Committee’s internal mailing list. “I’m really proud of the confidentiality our members keep. I’ve never heard a peep outside the group,” McKay emphasized. They review the materials submitted by each prospective nominee and discuss any knowledge they have of the nominee through previous professional contacts, both in and out of NASIG. Wherever possible, the committee also tries to balance the slate of nominees with newer and older members, by location, and by type of institutional affiliation. Only after all this work is completed does the committee submit a ballot for approval. The ballots are then sent out with supporting biographical material and returned by NASIG members. When the next ballot arrives in your mail in February, keep in mind the effort involved in putting it together. REGIONAL COUNCILS AND MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE Speaking with Linda Smith Griffin about the Regional Councils & Membership Committee (RC&M) is an energizing experience. It’s clear that Linda is excited about the Committee and its place in NASIG. There are twelve membership regions. The United States is divided into seven regions; Canada into three; all of Mexico is one region; and all other international members makes up the last region. When you include the state representatives, RC&M is NASIG’s largest—and perhaps most active— committee, with 55 members. (The NASIG Publicist was originally a member of this committee, but became an independent position last year.) Some committee members attend local library association conferences and other professional meetings and set up a display using membership brochures and a traveling NASIG banner. RC&M also mails information packets and membership forms to all non-member attendees of the NASIG Annual Conference. Of the 175 people who received packets last year, 66 joined NASIG. Griffin hopes for even better results with this year’s mailing. People who post on professional mailing lists and mention being new to serials are also contacted with membership [Note: Please report promotions, awards, new degrees, new positions and other significant professional milestones. You may submit items about yourself or other members to Carol MacAdam. Contributions on behalf of fellow members will be cleared with the person mentioned in the news item before they are printed. Please include your e-mail address or phone number.] Whitney Alexander tells us that, as of September 1999, he has accepted the position of Director of Technical Services at the Heafey Law Library at Santa Clara University. His previous position there was as Head of Acquisitions. Whit’s addresses remain the same. Here is Julia Blixrud’s news quoted from Library Journal Academic News Wire of August 17, 1999: “SPARC Names New Official:” The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) announced this week that Julia Blixrud has been appointed Assistant Director of Public Programs. Blixrud has been Director of Information Services and program officer for SPARC's parent organization, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), for nearly three years. In her new part-time role Blixrud will represent SPARC at conferences, association meetings, and in other forums where she will serve as a spokesperson on SPARC's initiatives within the scholarly TITLE CHANGES Carol MacAdam information. All new members receive a formal letter from the committee and a personal welcome from their regional representative. In keeping with NASIG’s increasingly international perspective, the group is revising the Spanish-language membership brochure and working on a French translation as well. RC&M is so broadly scattered that electronic communication is essential. Griffin credits the Committee’s electronic mailing list for making work easier. “When the list was developed, it was just for the regional representatives,” she said. “When we added the state representatives, it has done wonders to bring us together.” Griffin emphasizes their success is a team effort. “Members go to great lengths to be helpful. Not just on the Committee, but throughout the organization. It makes my job easier. People are interested and do what it takes to get the job done. I just ask and people say ‘yes’.” Griffin said RC&M is always looking for volunteers. “We’ll always have room for someone who is willing to grab a few brochures to hand out.” communications industry. "During the past year SPARC has assumed a major role in the global conversation on solutions to the journals crisis," says Richard Johnson, SPARC Enterprise Director. "Julia's broad and deep understanding of scholarly communications issues and her commitment to helping solve issues that most trouble libraries made her the natural choice to represent SPARC." Julia says, “SPARC is a great initiative and I'm delighted to be working in an area where we can make a difference for libraries and in the scholarly creation and dissemination process.” Julia says she is working to develop a grass-roots educational program aimed at scientists, librarians, and society publishers which will provide materials and presentations for SPARC members to use in their own campus communities. In addition to her SPARC duties, Julia is also the Director of Information Services for the Association of Research Libraries. She has planning responsibility for the Association's publications, communications, and datagathering activities. She also works with the Statistics and Measurement Program on the development of new measures, providing support for the research projects of the ARL Leadership and Career Development Program and assisting other programs with strategic planning and information outreach activities. Along with her ARL addresses, which remain the same, Julia has new addresses in Kansas: Assistant Director, Public Programs, SPARC 4207 West 12th Street Lawrence, KS 66049 Phone: (785) 841-5550 Fax: (785) 841-5576 E-mail: Jerry Brown writes: “I've taken up my new position as of Head of Reference and Systems Librarian at the College of Saint Mary in Omaha, Nebraska. I can already tell it is going to be lots, lots colder than in Georgia (but I already knew that, being from Kansas City, MO, in the first place). I actually started work on 18 October. Why are new jobs always a bit scary?” Jerry used to be an Instructor and Assistant Librarian at Fort Valley State University in Georgia. Her new addresses are: College of Saint Mary 1901 South 72nd Street Omaha, NE 68124 Phone: (402) 399-2468 E-mail: Steve Corrsin is now Acting Head of Cataloging at Wayne State University. He left his previous position as Head of Serial Acquisitions Services at Columbia University in August 1999. Steve and his family moved from New York to Detroit because of his wife’s career move. Steve’s new addresses are: Wayne State University 5048 Gullen Mall Detroit, MI 48202 Phone: (313) 577-4005 Fax: (313) 577-3615 E-mail: Paul Drake sends this news: “I started on March 1, 1999 as Document Delivery Librarian at the Johnson County Library. I'm the first holder of this position in which I supervise ILL and the periodicals operation for a sizeable public library (circulation 4.4 million; population base 310,000 residents). My basic duties are not very different from my responsibilities as Document Delivery Specialist at the Kansas City Public Library for the past four years, except that I also oversee the mailing services for the Library. So, I get to manage the really traditional postal delivery and library courier delivery of resources, as well as the electronic.” Paul’s new addresses are: Johnson County Library 9875 West 87th Street Overland Park, KS 66202 Phone: (913) 495-2439 E-mail: Great news about Connie Foster: Connie received the 1999 Outstanding Academic Librarian Award, given by the Academic Library Section of the Kentucky Library Association on October 14, 1999, for her significant contributions to the advancement of academic librarianship. Connie says that she was really surprised by the honor. She feels that her responsibilities in NASIG contributed greatly to winning the award, along with her recent presentation in Mexico City as a NASIG representative at the 7th Annual Meeting on Scholarly and Research Journals sponsored by Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Connie’s addresses at Western Kentucky University remain the same. [Ed. note: See the Connie’s report of this meeting in this Newsletter issue.] Vicki L. Gregory is now the Director of the School of Library and Information Science at the University of South Florida. She was previously Associate Professor there. Vicki’s addresses remain the same. From Joan Griffith we learn: “I'm writing to tell you about my exciting new job at Harrassowitz! In August I started my new job as Director of Marketing, based in Wiesbaden, Germany. I'll coordinate marketing information and public relations activities. It's hard to believe I've been living and working in Germany for more than four years already, after taking the position of Manager, Electronic Products in early 1996. My new position offers me an expanded role in such groups as the Association of Subscription Agents, UKSG and ALPSP (Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers). Prior to joining Harrassowitz, I previously held library positions as the Director of Library Technology Development at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, Assistant Serials Librarian at Dartmouth College, Serials Librarian and Monographer Cataloger at the University of New Hampshire. My continuing membership in NASIG and serving on the NASIG Regional Councils & Membership Committee helps to keep me in touch with colleagues throughout the serials world. The only part of my addresses that changes is my fax number.” Fax: +49 611-530-560. On September 1, 1999 Mildred Jackson was promoted to Head of the Serials Department at Grand Valley State University. Millie was previously a cataloger at GVSU. All Millie’s addresses remain the same. On November 1 Cathy Kellum started her new job as Consulting Product Support Specialist in Resource Sharing Product Management at OCLC Online Computer Library Center in Dublin, OH. She will deal mainly with ILL and union listing products, as she did in her previous position with the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET), an OCLC-affiliated regional network. She writes, "I'll miss the training and traveling aspect of my former position of Training Supervisor at SOLINET, but I'm very excited to be moving into an arena where I can be more proactive in anticipating and directing the future needs of libraries in interlibrary loan and union listing. In my new position I'll have the opportunity to be product manager for new and existing OCLC resource sharing services. Cathy's new contact information is: OCLC 6565 Frantz Road Dublin, OH 43017 Phone: (800) 848-5878 E-mail: Lee Krieger writes: “As of June 1, 1999, I was ‘promoted’ to the Head of Acquisitions position in the University of Miami's Richter Library. My former title, Assistant Head of Acquisitions, was eliminated, but not all of the duties were! However, a new position of Electronic Resources Librarian was created and that has reduced some of my responsibilities. I'm only wearing 2 hats now instead of 2.5!” All of Lee’s addresses remain the same. From Azadeh Mizadeh we learn: “I was recently promoted to Associate Librarian here at Greenley Library at the State University of New York at Farmingdale. As Head of the Serials Department I handle the daily operations of the Department and also maintain the Serials Department Web page and electronic journals collection.” All of Azadeh’s addresses remain the same. Steve Oberg sends this news: “As of the beginning of September, I resigned my position at the University of Chicago Library to accept an offer from Endeavor Information Systems, Inc. to work in their Development Division as Systems Analyst. Endeavor is a leading ILS vendor and my particular focus will be on developments relating to the acquisitions and cataloging modules of their Voyager system. Obviously, this is quite a career change but I am thoroughly enjoying the opportunities for learning and growth at Endeavor. My primary contact information now is my home address. Please also feel free to contact me at Endeavor. 1426 Stonebridge Circle, K-8 Wheaton, IL 60187-7199 E-mail: Endeavor Information Systems, Inc. 2200 East Devon, Suite 382 Des Plaines, IL 60018-4505 Phone: (800) 762-2300 x2640 E-mail: Joyce Ogburn has a new job as of August 23. She is now an Associate Director of the Libraries at the University of Washington, with responsibility for Resources and Collection Management Services. Joyce was previously Associate University Librarian for Information Resources and Systems at Old Dominion University. Joyce writes about her new job: “My position at UW includes leadership and management of collection development, technical services and international studies. I will devote time to developing partnership opportunities, consortia activities, new programs, and supporting a new organization. Managing international studies is a new and exciting venture for me.” Joyce’s new addresses are: University of Washington Libraries Box 352900 Seattle WA 98195-2900 Phone: (206) 685-2889 Fax: (206) 685-8727 E-mail: Lisa Rowlison has joined the faculty at California State University Monterey Bay to serve as the Library’s Coordinator of Bibliographic Services. Previously she was Catalog Librarian at Lewis & Clark College in Portland Oregon. In 1992 Lisa received one of NASIG's student grants to attend the NASIG Conference that year. Lisa’s new addresses are: California State University Monterey Bay Library 100 Campus Center, Building 12 Seaside, CA 93955-8001 Phone: (831) 582-4642 Fax: (831) 582-3875 E-mail: Laura Sill, former head of Serials at the University of Notre Dame, is now busy with the joys and challenges of being full-time mom to her new daughter Natalie Rose and also works part-time for Notre Dame as Library Systems Special Projects Librarian. In her capacity as Special Projects Librarian, Laura is focused on the implementation of the Ex Libris Aleph 500 system for the Michiana Academic Library Consortium. She will be working closely with the local Aleph Working Group and planning the spring 2000 meeting of the North American Aleph Users' Group (NAAUG) to be held on the campus of the University of Notre Dame. Laura can be reached at: Library Systems G104 Hesburgh Library University of Notre Dame Notre Dame, IN 46556 Phone: (219) 631-6693 Fax: (219) 631-6772 E-mail: From a Blackwell’s Information Services press release we learn that “Heather Steele has been appointed Interim CEO for Blackwell's Information Services. Heather has been with Blackwell's for more than 20 years and has in more recent years been Director of Academic Sales for North America, Canada and Australasia. Her extensive knowledge and understanding of the global journals subscription industry will help to ensure that the transition of Blackwell's Information Services and Swets Subscription Services into a new company will be professionally and sensitively managed.” Heather’s addresses remain the same. News from Peter Whiting: “Greetings from southern Indiana! I am the newly minted Serials Librarian at the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville. As the first Serials Librarian at USI, I have the exciting opportunity to build a dynamic Serials Department. I started here on September 15, 1999. I am fortunate to be able to work with a terrific library staff. While here in Indiana I have taken advantage of the fall colors to take photographs. My previous position was Cataloging Librarian at Prairie View A&M University in Texas.” Peter’s new addresses: David L. Rice Library University of Southern Indiana 8600 University Boulevard Evansville, IN 47712 Phone: (812) 465-1280 Fax: (812) 465-1693 E-mail: SERIALS RELATED REPORTS This past June at the NASIG Conference at Carnegie Mellon, I was pleased to meet up once again with Ros Doig, Serials and Inter-Lending Librarian from the University of Derby in the UK. Ros is an active member of our sister organization, the United Kingdom Serials Group (UKSG), and recently became a member of NASIG as well. Ros and I first met this past April while I was representing NASIG at UKSG’s 22nd annual conference/4th European Serials Conference at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST). For several years now, Ros has written the UKSG conference report for the Newsletter. In Pittsburgh, Ros and I met over breakfast one morning to discuss a new plan for this year’s report. We agreed that it would be interesting to go beyond a straightforward UKSG report to compare and contrast our respective conference experiences. This article is the result. STEVE’S IMPRESSIONS FROM UKSG @ UMIST As we all know, it was UKSG’s example that gave the initial impetus to the founding of our organization some 14 years ago. We are very fortunate to have several active members of UKSG attend our annual conferences each year, and I have become acquainted with many of them. I am now a seasoned NASIG attendee, having been to just about every conference since Trinity in 1991. So it was with quite a bit of curiosity that I looked forward to attending my first ever UKSG conference–I wanted to see UKSGers on their “home turf.” Would the conference be like NASIG, or completely different? Would there be the same friendly atmosphere, or would it be a formal event? What would the program be like? Upon my arrival in Manchester, I was greeted with somewhat rainy, cold weather, but that was expected. The conference site, UMIST, is an urban campus well suited to hosting such an event due to close proximity to classroom and lecture hall space. NASIGers are used to dormitory accommodations; at UMIST the accommodations were somewhat similar but overall, definitely better than we usually get for our conferences. My room was quite small, but it was en suite–a real plus. Another nice touch was the provision of an electric teakettle, china cup and saucer, and several choices for tea as well as coffee in each room. (Would that we were that civilized in the U.S.!) Each morning a complete cooked breakfast with an impressive array of choices was served in the same building. The program each morning started between 9 and 10 a.m., enabling a more leisurely morning than at most NASIG conferences. The meals and breaks during the program each day were catered and were generally of a higher caliber than ours. For a couple of the meals there was a shortage of food, though. A novel element was that everyone ate standing up, as there was no seating space provided. Because of the proximity between the main building where most of the sessions were held and the building where we stayed, it was very convenient to go back to my room during a break in the program for a quick rest if I felt like it. A bonus for this year’s conference was that it was combined with the European Serials Conference. This made the conference attendance larger than normal for UKSG, although still quite a bit less populous than a typical NASIG conference. There were attendees from all over Europe, some from North America, and also from Africa. The highest concentration of people was from the UK and Northern Europe (Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands, etc.). This international flavor is one of the best aspects of UKSG, enabling one to have a unique sense of the shared concerns of serialists from many parts of the globe. I was pleased to meet Claus Pederson, chair of the European Federation of Serials Groups (EFSG), and to actively participate in an informal group discussion among European peers and colleagues as to future directions that EFSG should take. In this as in many other instances, I found great similarity in atmosphere between UKSG and NASIG conferences. Informal, open discussion was fostered. The vendor exhibition is a major component of UKSG conferences, unlike at NASIG. I understand that exhibits at UKSG conferences have been very successful and grown in scope over the past few years. While I am not a fan of the idea of having exhibits at NASIG, I enjoyed the opportunity to meet and greet exhibitors at UKSG. As Ros points out, exhibitors are not just there for the exhibition–they play as active a role in the conference as any normal attendee. The most noticeable aspect to their presence in the event was their business attire. UKSG attendees definitely adhere to a fancier dress code than their NASIG counterparts! There are major differences in the program schedule at UKSG, particularly in timing. My impression is that UKSG has a more comfortable, well-paced timing, whereas the usual NASIG conference schedule is very tight, timewise, with events starting earlier in the morning and finishing later in the evening. Our conferences are mainly on weekends, whereas UKSG is held during the first part of the workweek. Another interesting aspect to note is that the program is pieced together entirely by the UKSG Committee (similar in function to our Executive Board), rather than by a separate program planning committee. In spite of these differences, I noticed a few interesting similarities. For example, I can see where the familiar NASIG programmatic elements of plenary/ concurrent/workshop sessions got their origin. I also suspect that UKSG’s famous 60’s disco, held after 9 p.m. each evening, was the inspiration for our Late Night Socials. Too bad the Brits don’t play Euchre instead J. The sight of UK colleagues boogeying madly all night long, some of the men still wearing suits and ties, was an impression I will not soon forget. Three particular program sessions stick out in my memory: one was a very interesting plenary session given by Albert Prior (Swets & Zeitlinger) on a survey of electronic journal pricing models. The other was a workshop given by colleagues from the Technical Knowledge Centre of Denmark on new approaches to human resources management in the digital library context. The last one was the keynote paper by Mark Clark of the University of Salford on the changing landscape for the information professional. Last but not least, I would like to comment on the entertainment at UKSG vs. NASIG. As noted above, the 60’s disco showed me that UKSGers really know how to party! I was also very impressed and pleased by their ready acceptance of a former colonial like me. In every social occasion, people went out of their way to make me feel welcome and at ease, buying me drinks, sharing a bottle of wine, etc. I made a lot of new friends with whom I plan to keep in touch. The crown jewel of the conference entertainment was the all-conference reception at the gorgeous Manchester Town Hall, over which the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Manchester presided. Given my honorary status as NASIG President, I was invited to join Richard Hodson, Chair of UKSG, Claus Pederson, EFSG Chair, and Keith Courtney, UKSG Secretary, for a special, pre-dinner reception in the Lord Mayor’s private chambers. This gave us a chance to get to know the Lord Mayor and his wife and to talk about the office and about the town hall itself. From this conversation I learned that the office of Lord Mayor is one to which a person is elected to serve for one year by vote of the city council. While its role is mainly ceremonial, it is considered a great honor to hold this office. (In visits with family and friends elsewhere in the UK after the conference, people were invariably–surprisingly–impressed that I rubbed shoulders with such exalted folk.) Interestingly, the current Lady Mayoress was Lord Mayor some years ago, before her husband took that office. Given this experience, I’m not sure that NASIG can top UKSG in terms of pomp and circumstance! A great deal of credit and praise for the success of the conference belongs to Richard Hodson, and Jill Tolson (UKSG Business Manager), who provided a warm, friendly welcome and made certain that any needs I might have were met. Thank you to you both! Many others deserve credit as well, including members of the Committee and Claus Pederson of EFSG. I thoroughly enjoyed my experience at UKSG and definitely plan to come again. WHAT ROS HAD TO SAY ABOUT NASIG @ CARNEGIE MELLON A month has about passed since I returned after twelve memorable days in America, culminating in my attendance at the 14th NASIG conference in Pittsburgh. My trip was largely centered around libraries – after all I was on business. But quite honestly it was what we Brits call a “busman's holiday;” that is, doing for pleasure what you work at the rest of the week! Though I have to say I must have spent nearly as much time NOT doing library things even though I was in the very pleasant company of fellow professionals who are slightly crazy about serials. Perhaps a brief itinerary is in order. This was my first visit and probably only visit for a long while, so I determined to make the most of it. I began by staying a few days in Florida with a librarian friend, then headed north for a couple of nights in Washington. I spent most of the full day I had at my disposal at the Library of Congress. I then spent one day travelling to Pittsburgh by plane and train, and the rest, as they say, is history. Suffice to say that I thoroughly enjoyed the NASIG conference from all points of view -- Pittsburgh was delightful, the company congenial, and the proceedings professionally inspiring. So how did I rate it alongside the UKSG conferences, which I know well? There are several major differences. The UKSG is always held at the beginning of the week, and the conference tends to get underway mid-morning on Monday. People travelling from afar (a relative term in Britain!) arrive on the Sunday; there is an excellent social event to start things off -- usually a meal in a local pub! The conference finishes at lunchtime on the Wednesday. The UKSG no longer organizes visits for the conference -- transport schedules tend to dictate departures in the early afternoon if not before. Many of us take trains rather than planes! The timing in the week of both conferences produces the same net result workwise – i.e. basically two days at work in the week. NASIGers however sacrifice a weekend and start their sessions very early in the morning though I felt this was adequately compensated by the wonderful dinner aboard the river boat on Friday night, and the splendid social/cultural activities of Saturday and Sunday. And it would be churlish not to mention the reception on Thursday night in the magnificent surroundings of the Carnegie Music Hall and Museum. I reveled in it all. Another major difference is the absence of an exhibition at NASIG. I had an interesting discussion with Steve on this one. He felt that something that was basically put on by the commercial interest was inappropriate. I begged to differ. Many years ago it was this very thing at UKSG that had really drawn me to the group. The exhibition was actually staged by members of the group who were there on the same basis as myself. The obvious presence of vendors and publishers made me realize what an excellent range of interests was represented and how much was achieved by knowing who they were and establishing more personal relationships with them simply because they were more visible. Yes, of course they are promoting products and services, but I find I'm aware of much of these through flyers I have received in the post and therefore am perhaps interested to see actual demonstrations. I'm quite a hard nut where it comes to sales – I don't actually have any spending power in my library so I can only make suggestions! The actual time-tabling of the NASIG conference is very different to that of the UKSG. NASIG has three main plenary sessions with speakers talking for an hour to start each day, and then breaks out into parallel “Issues” and “Workshop” sessions. UKSG on the other hand has mostly plenary sessions in themed sections of three speakers giving a half-hour talk. There are three workshop sessions incorporated into the entire program. I really enjoyed the longer plenary sessions: they were inspirational and visionary. It was interesting that the speakers were not information professionals but obviously down to earth IT enthusiasts. I felt that an hour gave them time to expand on their subject matter and me time to relax and get into what they were saying. Having it as the start of each day also helped to put the more nitty-gritty issues and workshop presentations in a broader context. One of the problems I have as UKSG reporter for NASIG is that because UKSG speakers only have half an hour and use their PowerPoint presentations to good effect, they cram in so much information that I end up with mental indigestion trying to get it all down! Which is why these days you get a flavor of the conference from me, not a blow by blow account. Another feature that seems a good idea is the opportunity to purchase a set of conference handouts. Mine arrived in the post this morning and I am looking forward to seeing what I missed! A quick glance suggests it is full of useful ideas. It's also another reminder of a wonderful few days. NASIGers and UKSG folk have plenty in common – not least that we are all very social people and get along famously together. It gave me real pleasure to meet all those wonderful colleagues who have made the trip to Britain and to meet plenty more of you as well. Once upon a time you were all way ahead of what we were doing over here but now we are all struggling with the same problems – such is the power of the Internet! Moreover no one has all of the answers: we share our ideas and experience. I felt quite at home in my workshop sessions! NASIG of course has a huge national membership covering a huge geographical area; this must influence considerably the organization and logistics of the conference. It must be said, however, the UKSG attracts between 400 and 500 delegates, which limits the location of our conference. I feel I should publicly thank the conference organizers for looking after me so well. I know it wasn't all plain sailing for them owing to certain circumstances beyond their control (the very hot weather mainly!!!), but it will remain an unforgettable experience which I will treasure for years to come. Oddly enough in a strange, unlooked for, but very personal way I found at Carnegie Mellon one of the “Holy Grails” of my career as a librarian. As part of my library studies many years ago I did a course on historical bibliography which included some lectures on the Private Press movement of the late 19th Century. My lecturer was an enthusiast and there was one book he had impressed upon us as being an outstanding example of fine typography and book making of this period – the Doves Press Bible. This title had stuck in my mind ever since, though I had never seen the book itself. There are no words to describe my utter surprise, joy and delight when I discovered that the Hunt library had this very work and the Special Collections Librarian fetched it out just for me! It was a truly outstanding magic moment. Thank you NASIG! CEC-SPONSORED TRIP TO EN LÍNE@99 Steve Oberg and Beverley Geer Pursuant to NASIG’s strategic interest in furthering opportunities for participation in our organization by Mexican colleagues, the Continuing Education Committee sponsored two NASIG members as speakers for En Líne@99 conference (http://enlinea.mty.itesm. mx/), held in Monterrey, Mexico from October 13-15. This annual conference is hosted by the Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM). Its purpose is to provide an opportunity for information professionals, marketers, advertisers and technology leaders to gather to discuss and learn more about new technologies and management trends for online information. (Note: The conference is also affiliated with the Monterrey Book Fair.) Participants came from all over Mexico, with some attendance from the U.S. About 600 people were registered for the event. Major themes for this year’s conference program included: • E-commerce • Knowledge management • Information management • Information technology • Online systems • Electronic publications Beverley Geer and Steve Oberg were invited to represent NASIG at this event. Rogelio Hinojosa, RC&M member and an invaluable resource for information on the current state of affairs in the Mexican library and information science community, was also present as part of the conference program. The topic of our presentation was “Digital vs. Traditional Resources in Academic Libraries: Strategies for Integration.” We took about 30-40 minutes to present our main themes, and then spent over an hour entertaining questions from the audience. The questions we were asked were thought provoking and challenging, including questions such as: • What criteria should we follow for selecting what Web sites to provide access to for our patrons? • What do you know about intelligent agents and their role in the operation of a digital library? • Is there a Spanish language version of official MARC documentation available? • If we cancel a print subscription and subscribe instead to the electronic version, we might have a budget shortfall and not be able to renew our electronic subscription, leaving us with a significant gap in our holdings. Any thoughts on how to handle this kind of decision (electronic vs. print, given tenuous budgets from year to year)? • Is there any way that Mexican libraries can partner with U.S. libraries in a consortium to spread out the costs of subscribing to e-content? In addition to giving a presentation, we were able to have an exhibit booth and to have NASIG designated as an official sponsor of the event. This meant that the NASIG logo was included on the official conference signage, as well as on the conference Web site. Other sponsors/ exhibitors included companies such as Sun Microsystems, InfoLatina, PeopleSoft, OCLC, and ISI. Beverley, Rogelio, Marina (Rogelio’s wife), and Steve took turns staffing the exhibit booth, where we handed out Spanishlanguage membership brochures and talked one-on-one with persons walking through the exhibit hall. A number of people who visited our booth were actually students enrolled in library and/or information management programs. For them, we particularly emphasized the Student Grant and Fritz Schwartz scholarship opportunities; at least two of them assured us that they would apply. We estimate that about 75-100 brochures were handed out. It is important to note that we also took the opportunity of this trip to distribute a survey designed to test demand for a Spanish-language translation of the CONSER Cataloging Manual. Lisa Furubotten of the CEC did an excellent job of providing us with a Spanish language version of this survey. About 50 survey forms were handed out. We had a definite sense that our Mexican colleagues were interested in more Spanish-language versions of standard cataloging tools. Based upon conversations with attendees as well as with Rogelio, we gained several insights into the issue of NASIG involvement with Mexico. For example, a few attendees felt reluctant to pay as much as US$25 per year to join. However, Rogelio assured us that this figure was in fact affordable and actually cheaper than annual membership in the largest Mexican library professional organization, AMBAC (Asociación Mexicana de Bibliotecarios, A. C.). He pointed out that a more telling factor to Mexican colleagues is the difference in the culture of professional association membership, particularly in an association that is viewed as somewhat distant and international like NASIG. Rogelio noted that colleagues in Mexico particularly value a local or regional chapter arrangement such as apparently exists within AMBAC. Obviously, we lack this kind of structure in NASIG. From attending various presentations we gained insights as to possible speakers for future NASIG conferences, as well as ideas for further publicizing NASIG opportunities in the Mexican information and library science community. Finally, we were impressed by the well functioning simultaneous translation system employed by the conference organizers, which made dual-language interaction possible. Thanks are due to several people who helped with this trip: to CEC for sponsoring this trip; to Priscilla Shontz in particular for doing an astute job of identifying this event and facilitating NASIG’s participation; to Claudia Garza of ITESM, the main conference organizer and contact person who so graciously took care of our needs; and to Rogelio Hinojosa and his wife, Marina, for helping to staff the exhibit booth in spite of their hectic schedule, as well as for helpful insights into Mexican librarianship. In summary, this conference experience provided us with an opportunity to: • Distribute 75-100 membership brochures • Distribute about 50 survey forms on need for Spanish-language edition of CONSER Cataloging Manual • Increase awareness of NASIG and its goals among conference attendees, through NASIG’s cosponsorship of En Líne@99 • Solicit possible applicants for NASIG Conference Student Grant, Fritz Schwartz Scholarship • Gain a better understanding of how we can involve colleagues in Mexico in NASIG • Observe what it takes to run simultaneous translation in a conference program 7a REUNIÓN SOBRE REVISTAS ACADÉMICAS Y DE INVESTIGACIÓN SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 1, 1999 Connie Foster, NASIG President-Elect "Temblor de tierra" was the surprise happening during the 7th Meeting on Scholarly and Research Journals sponsored by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City, Sept. 30-Oct. 1. Although the earthquake temporarily moved us outside the Museum of Anthropology, where the meeting was being held, the 250 attendees regrouped inside to finish hearing Carol MacAdam's response to a question. Thanks to NASIG's Continuing Education Committee for sponsoring me as a speaker. Several other NASIG members were present as speakers representing their companies and as audience (Carol MacAdam spoke about archives; John Tagler attended while Judy Weislogel from Elsevier spoke). Harry Hoffer (Faxon) and UNAM's library director (and NASIG member) Adolpho Rodríguez Gallardo (who also spoke) organized a wonderful conference. I represented American librarians and NASIG for the theme "New Trends in Electronic Publishing and Information Services." I also left the NASIG Spanish brochures for those interested to pick up any time during that day. The other keynote speakers and reactors, and questions from the audience contributed to a very dynamic and useful experience. Other speakers were Dante Precado and Lesley D'Almeda (Cambridge Scientific Abstracts), Adam Klein (ISI), Lynne Karle (Information Quest, Dawson/RoweCom), and Adam Chesler (Kluwer). The simultaneous translation greatly eased our ability to communicate throughout the four general sessions, which focused on preservation, information access, transition from print to digital, role of the information professional, and copyright. During a coffee break, several librarians asked me questions about education required in the U.S. and whether many librarians worked at home. I valued greatly all the exchanges of information and the opportunity to learn more about library concerns and trends in Mexico and to become better acquainted with U.S. colleagues. NASIG's commitment to continuing education in many venues is exciting and dynamic. I look forward to more focus on gaining members across the borders and continuing to build an enriched and diverse organization. IN MEMORIAM: PETER GELLATLY Jim Cole Peter Gellatly, the founding editor of The Serials Librarian, passed away October 5, 1999, in Vancouver, British Columbia, of complications from surgery for an aneurysm. Under Peter's editorship, SL began publishing the proceedings of each of NASIG's annual conferences, an arrangement that has served both NASIG and the journal well, and which endures to this day. Born in Scotland, Peter moved to Canada as a young child. He served in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II and later in a confidential governmental capacity in Ottawa. He received a B.A. from the University of British Columbia and a Master's degree in Library Science from the University of Washington. Peter's library career included positions on both sides of the U.S./Canadian border. He worked as a cataloger for the Library of Parliament in Ottawa and as a reference librarian at Algonquin College, also in Ottawa. He was a member of the University of Washington Libraries' staff for twenty-three years, serving first as Head Bibliographer and then as Head of the Serials Division. Peter edited SL from its first issue in the fall of 1976 until the completion of volume 26 in 1995. He also edited the first three volumes of Technical Services Quarterly and sixteen volumes of Collection Management. He was an exceptional librarian and accomplished editor; more important, though, he was a both gentleman and loyal friend to his associates. His business relationships reflected not only his kind, gentle manner but also an active, personal interest in people. Peter's good nature and his method of conducting business will have a lasting effect on many of us who knew him well. CALENDAR Carol MacAdam [Please submit announcements for upcoming meetings, conferences, workshops and other events of interest to your NASIG colleagues to Carol MacAdam, ] January 14-20, 2000 American Library Association Midwinter Meeting San Antonio, Texas http://www.ala.org/events/mw2000/index.html March 14-18, 2000 15th Annual Computers in Libraries Washington, District of Columbia http://www.infotoday.com/cil2000/cil2000.htm March 16–17, 2000 Ninth North Carolina Serials Conference Chapel Hill, North Carolina March 28–April 1, 2000 Public Library Association 8th Annual Conference Charlotte, North Carolina http://www.pla.org/conf00/index.html April 10-12, 2000 United Kingdom Serials Group 23rd Annual Conference and Exhibition Keele, England http://www.uksg.org/conferences/2000/ May 5-11, 2000 Medical Library Association Annual Meeting "Demystifying the Dragon: Strategies for 2000 Plus" Vancouver, British Columbia http://www.mlanet.org/am/am2000/index.html Jointly presented by the MLA and the Canadian Health Libraries Association/Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada. May 16-18, 2000 21st National Online Meeting & Integrated Online Library Systems 2000 New York, New York http://www.infotoday.com/ May 20-23, 2000 The First Acquisitions Institute at Timberline Lodge "Acquisitions and Collection Development in the 21st Century" http://libweb.uoregon.edu/acqdept/institute.html Near Portland, Oregon [Ed. Note: This is the reincarnation of the Feather River Institute.] June 1-3, 2000 Society for Scholarly Publishing Annual Meeting Baltimore, Maryland http://www.sspnet.org Contact: Janet Fisher Email: June 10-15, 2000 Special Libraries Association 91st Annual Conference “Independence to Interdependence: The Next Phase in the Information Revolution” Philadelphia, Pennsylvania http://www.sla.org/conf/2000conf/index.html June 21-25, 2000 Canadian Library Association 55th Annual Conference "Information Communities at the Turn of the Century: Reading the Past, Writing the Future" Edmonton, Alberta The CLA Serials Interest Group is sponsoring a 3hour session at this Conference: "Serials in the 21st Century: Print, Electronic, or Something Else?" Contact: Kewal Krishan Email: June 22-25, 2000 NASIG 15th Annual Conference "Making Waves: New Serials Landscapes in a Sea of Change" University of California at San Diego San Diego, California July 6-July 13, 2000 American Library Association Annual Conference Chicago, Illinois July 15-20, 2000 American Association of Law Libraries Annual Meeting "Gateways to Leadership" Philadelphia, Pennsylvania http://www.aallnet.org/events/00_home.asp August 13-18, 2000 International Federation of Library Associations 66th Council and General Conference Jerusalem, Israel November 2-4, 2000 19th Annual Charleston Conference on Issues in Book and Serial Acquisitions Charleston, South Carolina March 15-18, 2001 Association of College and Research Libraries 10th National Conference “Crossing the Divide” Denver, Colorado http://www.ala.org/acrl/denver.html See also the American Libraries “Datebook” at: http://www.ala.org/alaonline/datebook/datebook.html, and the schedule of CONSER’s Serials Cooperative Training Program (SCCTP) at: http://lcweb.loc.gov/acq/conser/scctp/schedule.html North American Serials Interest Group APPLICATION FOR THE 2000 NASIG HORIZON AWARD [Please see also the “NASIG Awards” article in this Newsletter issue.] Name: Preferred mailing address: E-mail address: Employment (please describe the position(s) and state the dates for each): *Current serials position: *Previous serials position(s): *Other library position(s) and/or library-related position(s): Education (please list all degrees; include name of institution awarding the degree(s), name(s) of the degree(s), and date(s)): [2000 NASIG Horizon Award Application, p. 2 of 2] Professional activities: Professional goals and objectives: How did you hear about NASIG? Are you a member of NASIG? If no, how would a NASIG membership benefit you? Have you attended any previous NASIG conferences? Please describe the ways that you would expect to benefit from attending a NASIG conference: Please write an essay discussing the 2000 NASIG conference theme, "Making Waves: New Serials Landscapes In A Sea Of Change." Include in your discussion the theme's relevance to the information community, to serials work, and to your own professional goals. (Note: the award recipients' essays will be published in the NASIG Newsletter.) This completed application, an up-to-date vita, and completed reference questionnaire are to be returned by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Incomplete application packets and those postmarked after February 16, 2000 will not be considered. Fax submissions are acceptable. Please return to: PAT FRADE, Co-Chair, NASIG Awards & Recognition Committee Serials Cataloger Phone: (801) 378-6730 6380 Harold B. Lee Library Fax: (801) 378-3221 or: (801) 378-6708 Brigham Young University E-Mail: Provo, UT 84602 2000 NASIG HORIZON AWARD REFERENCE QUESTIONNAIRE [Please see also the “NASIG Awards” article in this Newsletter issue.] DESCRIPTION OF AWARD: The purpose of the NASIG Horizon Award is to advance the serials profession by providing promising new serialists with the opportunity to accelerate their knowledge and understanding of serials by networking and interacting with a wide range of dedicated professionals working in all segments of the serials information chain. The award provides the recipient(s) with a firsthand introduction to NASIG by sponsoring attendance at the NASIG annual conference. NASIG will pay for all conference registration, housing, and travel costs. In addition, the recipient(s) will receive a year's free membership in NASIG and will be invited to serve on a NASIG committee the year following the award. A maximum of three awards per year are given. ELIGIBILITY: Applicants must currently be in a position of a professional nature with primary responsibilities for some aspect of serials, e.g. head of serials, serials acquisitions, serials vendor, serials publisher. Applicants must have served in this position for no more than three years at the time of the application deadline and must not have been in a professional library or library-related position (e.g. bookvendor, publisher) for more than five years at the time of the application deadline. Applicants must not have attended any previous NASIG conferences. Applicants do not have to be members of NASIG. Preference will be given to applicants employed by a North American organization or institution and to those whose career goals include professional growth and development in serials. YOU MUST HAVE SUPERVISED THE APPLICANT FOR AT LEAST SIX (6) MONTHS. IF YOU HAVE NOT, THE APPLICANT'S FORMER SUPERVISOR SHOULD COMPLETE THIS QUESTIONNAIRE. Please answer the following questions as they relate to the applicant for the NASIG Horizon Award. Please return to the address below no later than FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Thank you for your time in completing this questionnaire. 1) Describe the applicant's position: 2) How long have you supervised the applicant? 3) Describe the applicant's interest in and aptitude for serials: 4) Describe the applicant's basic strengths and weaknesses: 5) Describe why you think the applicant would benefit from attendance at a NASIG conference: [2000 NASIG Horizon Award Reference Questionnaire, p. 2 of 2] 6) Describe how the applicant could use the conference experience in his/her present position: 7) What potential do you think the applicant shows for further development and long-term contributions to the serials profession? 8) What other relevant information about the applicant would you like to share with us? Signature: Title: Date: Please return to: PAT FRADE, Co-Chair, NASIG Awards & Recognition Committee Serials Cataloger Phone: (801) 378-6730 6380 Harold B. Lee Library Fax: (801) 378-3221 or: (801) 378-6708 Brigham Young University E-mail: Provo, UT 84602 APPLICATION FOR THE 2000 NASIG CONFERENCE STUDENT GRANT Name of applicant________________________________________________________ Citizenship status ________________________________________________________ Mailing address (as of 4/00) Phone number (_____) ____________________________________________________ E-mail address (_____)____________________________________________________ Name and address of ALA accredited library school you are attending: Date (mo/yr) of anticipated graduation______________________________________________________________ Colleges and other institutions of higher education attended: Name of school/major/minor/years attended/date degree awarded Present position (if employed) ____________________________________________________________________ Place of employment ___________________________________________________________________________ Beginning date of employment_____________ Full or part-time?_____________ List any library and/or library-related work experience (other than above): Name and address of employer/position description/dates of employment Have you ever attended a NASIG conference?_____________________ What are your professional career goals, and how are serials related to those goals? Please list the course work you have taken or will take that will prepare you for some aspect of serials work. Please explain how these courses have prepared or will prepare you for serials work. [2000 NASIG Conference Student Grant Application, p. 2 of 2] Explain briefly how attending the NASIG conference will help you achieve your academic and/or professional goals. Where did you hear about the NASIG Conference Student Grant? (e.g. listserv, library school, journal publication, a NASIG member?) Please be specific. The applicant's faculty sponsor or library supervisor must complete the attached reference questionnaire. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure that the Committee Chair receives the application and questionnaire by the indicated deadline. Name, title, and telephone number(s) of sponsoring faculty member or current library supervisor who may be contacted: Name (please type or print): ____________________________________________ Title: __________________________________ Work phone: (_____) ____________________ E-mail: _______________________________________ Signature of sponsor: ___________________________________ Date: __________________ I understand that if chosen as a student grant recipient, at the time of accepting the grant offer, I shall not be employed in a position requiring an ALA-accredited degree, on leave from such a position, nor have accepted such a position. I also acknowledge that I shall not have earned my graduate level library degree prior to spring semester 2000 and that I have never attended a NASIG conference. Signature of applicant: __________________________________ Date: _________________ Note: please do not include any extra documentation, e.g., resume, transcript, or letters of recommendation. They will not be reviewed. Application deadline: FEBRUARY 16, 2000 The completed application and reference questionnaire must be received by the Committee Co-Chair (address below) postmarked no later than FEBRUARY 16, 2000: Reference questionnaire regarding applicant for 2000 NASIG CONFERENCE STUDENT GRANT [Please seealsothe“NASIGAwards”articleinthisNewsletter issue.] The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) is currently seeking candidates for grants to attend the Fifteenth Annual Conference to be held at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on June 22-25, 2000. Established in 1985, NASIG is an independent organization that promotes communication and sharing of ideas among all members of the serials information chain - anyone working with or concerned about serials. For more information about NASIG, please see the NASIG Web page at http://www.nasig.org/. Through the granting of these awards, NASIG desires to encourage participation in this information chain by students who are interested in pursuing some aspect of serials work upon completion of their professional degrees. Each June the annual conference is held on a different college or university campus, where the various segments of the serials community (including publishers, vendors, and librarians) meet in an informal setting to network and share information. The conference includes the presentation of papers, panels, workshops, tours, and social events. Please type or print (black or blue ink only). ______________________________ (name of applicant) has applied for a grant to attend the 2000 NASIG conference. Based on your knowledge of the applicant, please answer the following questions about the applicant. Thank you for your time in completing this application. Note: Please do not include any extra documentation, e.g., resume, transcript, or letters of recommendation. They will not be reviewed. ALA-accredited library school applicant is attending: Rank the applicant in terms of: highest 5 4 3 2 1 lowest (a) quality of work? 5 4 3 2 1 (b) dependability? 5 4 3 2 1 (c) initiative? 5 4 3 2 1 Has the applicant ever indicated a desire to pursue serials work? How would you assess her/his potential to pursue a serials career? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ From your perspective, what are the applicant's basic strengths and weaknesses? How would these strengths and weaknesses affect the applicant's ability to perform serials work? [2000 NASIG Conference Student Grant Reference Questionnaire, p. 2 of 2] How do you think the applicant would benefit from the conference? How would he/she utilize this experience in the course of his/her coursework and/or professional development? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Describe and evaluate the applicant's potential to contribute to the profession. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Describe and evaluate the applicant's relationship with his/her peers? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Is there anything else you would like to tell us about the applicant that may be relevant to the purpose of the grant (i.e., encouraging students in the direction of some aspect of serials work)? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Name and title of faculty sponsor/library supervisor: Name (please type or print): _____________________________________ Title: __________________________________ Work phone: (____)_______________________ E-mail:_________________________________ Signature: ____________________________________________ Date: ________________ Completed application and reference questions must be received by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Return to: APPLICATION FOR THE 2000 FRITZ SCHWARTZ SERIALS EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP [Please see also the “NASIG Awards” article in this Newsletter issue.] Name (Last/First/Middle): Current address: City/State/Zip: Telephone/E-mail address: To what library program(s) have you applied for admission or are you currently attending or planning to attend?: School/Accepted?/Entry Date/Expected completion date EDUCATION List in chronological order all colleges, universities, and professional schools attended, with the most recent first. Name and address of institution and major/minor: Dates attended: Degree received: Dates attended: Degree received: Name and address of institution and major/minor: EXPERIENCE List all library, library-related, or otherwise relevant/significant jobs you have held, starting with the most recent: Name/Address of Employer/Dates: Job Title: Description of duties: Name/Address of Employer/Dates : Job Title: Description of duties: [2000 Schwartz Scholarship Application, p. 2 of 2] Name/Address of Employer/Dates: OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS Honors, scholarships, or prizes you have received: Membership in honor societies and professional organizations: Activities and interests (campus, community, other): REFERENCES Please provide two references from individuals who are well acquainted with your educational background, scholastic abilities, and personal character. Both references must be information specialists. Name/Institution Telephone: Name/Institution Telephone: NARRATIVE In approximately 250 words, please describe your career objectives and explain how your immediate academic plans contribute to their attainment. How are serials related to those goals? In approximately 250 words, please describe your qualifications for this award and explain how your qualifications satisfy the eligibility requirements and purpose of the award. Where did you hear about this scholarship? (e.g. listserv, library school, journal publication, a NASIG member?) Please be specific. AGREEMENT I agree that if I am awarded the Fritz award, I will complete a minimum of six credit hours of library/information science courses per semester during the academic year that the award is granted. Signature/Date: CONDITIONS An application will not be considered unless the following conditions are met: A completed and signed application form and resume/curriculum vita is sent to the Committee Co-Chair listed below postmarked by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Two letters of reference, completed, signed, and sealed by the evaluators and sent to the Committee Co-Chair listed below, postmarked by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Please send all materials to: MARKEL TUMLIN, NASIG Awards & Recognition Committee Co-Chair General Reference Division Phone: (619) 594-6875 University Library, LLA 1101-L Fax: (619) 594-3270 San Diego State University E-Mail: 5500 Camponile Drive San Diego, CA 92182-8050 Reference Questionnaire Regarding Applicant for 2000 NASIG FRITZ SCHWARTZ SERIALS EDUCATION SCHOLARSHIP [Please see also the “NASIG Awards” article in this Newsletter issue.] The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) and the Serials Industry Systems Advisory Committee (SISAC) is currently seeking to award a $2500 scholarship to a library science graduate student who demonstrates excellence in scholarship and the potential for accomplishment in a serials career. The purpose of the scholarship is to advance the serials profession by providing an aspiring library student who has prior serials experience with enhanced educational opportunities. In addition, the award recipient will receive a Student Grant Award to attend the Fifteenth Annual Conference to be held at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on June 22-25, 2000. Each June the conference is held on a different college or university campus, where the various segments of the serials community (including publishers, vendors, and librarians) meet in an informal setting to network and share information. The conference includes the presentation of papers, panels, workshops, tours, and social events. Established in 1985, NASIG is an independent organization that promotes communication and sharing of ideas among all members of the serials information chain—anyone working with or concerned about serials. For more information about NASIG, please see the NASIG Web page at http://nasig.org. SISAC provides a forum for professionals throughout the entire serials chain to work together in developing standardized formats with which to electronically transmit serials information. More information about SISAC is available at http://www.bookwire.com/bisg/sisac.html. Please type or print (black or blue ink only). ______________________________ (name of applicant) has applied for a Fritz Schwartz Serials Education Scholarship. Based on your knowledge of the applicant, please answer the following questions about the applicant. Thank you for your time in completing this application. Note: Please do not include any extra documentation, e.g., resume, transcript, or letters of recommendation. They will not be reviewed. ALA-accredited library school applicant is attending or plans to attend: Rank the applicant in terms of: Describe and assess the applicant's potential to pursue a serials career and contribute to the profession. ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Describe qualities you have observed in the applicant that lead you to believe that he/she possesses the potential for academic excellence in the pursuit of a library degree. ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ From your perspective, what are the applicant's basic strengths and weaknesses? How would these strengths and weaknesses affect the applicant's ability to perform serials work at a professional level? ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ How do you think the applicant would benefit from the conference? How would he/she utilize this experience in the course of his/her coursework and/or professional development? ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Describe and evaluate the applicant's relationship with his/her peers. ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Is there anything else you would like tell us about the applicant that may be relevant to the purpose of the scholarship (i.e., providing an aspiring library student who has prior serials experience with enhanced educational opportunities)? ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Name and title of faculty sponsor/library supervisor: Name (please type or print): _____________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________________ E-mail: __________________ Completed application,resume/curriculum vita, two essays and reference questions must be received by FEBRUARY 16, 2000. Return to: Send all submissions/editorial comments to: Steve Savage Head , Monograph Acquisitions, Exchanges & Gifts Room 1 , Hatcher Graduate Library University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1205 Phone: ( 734 ) 936 - 2308 Fax: ( 734 ) 936 -2304 E-mail: Send all items for “Title Changes” and the Calendar to : Carol MacAdam 188 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10016 Phone: ( 212 ) 592 - 7345 Fax: ( 212 ) 592 -7355 E-mail: Send inquiries concerning the NASIG organization, membership, and change of address information , to: Meg Merging University of Nebraska Libraries Love Library, 209N Lincoln, NE 68588 -0410 Phone: ( 402 ) 472 - 2517 Fax: ( 402 ) 472 -5131 E-mail: Send all claims for unreceived issues of the Newsletter to: John Harrison Ladd Library Bates College Lewiston , ME 04240 Phone: ( 207 ) 786 - 6270 Fax: ( 207 ) 786 -6055 E-mail: [2000 Schwartz Scholarship Reference Questionnaire , p. 2 of 2]


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Dec. 1999, NASIG Newsletter, 1999,