Letter to the Editor: Are American Surgical Residents Prepared for Humanitarian Deployment? A Comparative Analysis of Resident and Humanitarian Case Logs

World Journal of Surgery, Apr 2018

David J. Read

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Letter to the Editor: Are American Surgical Residents Prepared for Humanitarian Deployment? A Comparative Analysis of Resident and Humanitarian Case Logs

Letter to the Editor: Are American Surgical Residents Prepared for Humanitarian Deployment? A Comparative Analysis of Resident and Humanitarian Case Logs David J. Read 0 1 0 National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre , Dawin , Australia 1 & David J. Read - Dr. Lin et al. [ 1 ] should be congratulated for their thorough comparison of operative experience of US surgical residents during training versus that of Me´decins Sans Frontie`res (MSF) deployed surgeons. Such an analysis is a useful contribution in defining the professional and training requirements likely required for a surgeon wishing to deploy on a variety of humanitarian missions. However, the conclusion that US trained residents are unprepared for humanitarian deployment is overstated, as it only considers one model of care, that of the solitary pluripotent surgeon who can practise across a broad area of expertise. Unquestionably, this model of care has served several humanitarian actors well over many decades and has definite financial and logistic advantages. It is agreed that the increasing drive towards subspecialisation will make such surgeons harder to find, but an awakening of the requirements of global surgery may offset this somewhat. Australian Medical Assistant Teams (AUSMAT) have a differing model of care, based upon the ethos that as much as practical, a deployed surgeons scope of practice abroad should align to their practice at home, and that the recipient nation’s patients deserve a level of care at least equivalent to what is, or was, available locally. This has led to the model of a three person surgical team consisting of an obstetrician/gynaecologist, an orthopaedic surgeon and general surgeon, which can be varied according the requirement for the mission. For example, in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, the AUSMAT Emergency Medical Team Type 2 offered general and orthopaedic surgery, whilst the host nation continued to provide 1. Lin Y , Dahm J , Kuschner A et al ( 2018 ) Are American surgical residents prepared for humanitarian deployment? A comparative analysis of resident and humanitarian case logs . World J Surg 42 : 32 - 39 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s00268-017-4137-x 2. Read D , Holian A , Poutawera V et al ( 2016 ) Surgical workload of a foreign medical team after Typhoon Haiyan: surgery after Typhoon Haiyan . ANZ J Surg 86 ( 5 ): 361 - 365


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David J. Read. Letter to the Editor: Are American Surgical Residents Prepared for Humanitarian Deployment? A Comparative Analysis of Resident and Humanitarian Case Logs, World Journal of Surgery, 2018, 1-1, DOI: 10.1007/s00268-018-4645-3