Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at N3LO in QCD

Journal of High Energy Physics, May 2018

Abstract We present the Higgs boson production cross section at Hadron colliders in the gluon fusion production mode through N3LO in perturbative QCD. Specifically, we work in an effective theory where the top quark is assumed to be infinitely heavy and all other quarks are considered to be massless. Our result is the first exact formula for a partonic hadron collider cross section at N3LO in perturbative QCD. Furthermore, our result is an analytic computation of a hadron collider cross section involving elliptic integrals. We derive numerical predictions for the Higgs boson cross section at the LHC. Previously this result was approximated by an expansion of the cross section around the production threshold of the Higgs boson and we compare our findings. Finally, we study the impact of our new result on the state of the art prediction for the Higgs boson cross section at the LHC.

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Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at N3LO in QCD

JHE Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at N3LO Bernhard Mistlberger 0 Theory Division 0 0 CH-1211 , Geneva 23 , Switzerland We present the Higgs boson production cross section at Hadron colliders in the gluon fusion production mode through N3LO in perturbative QCD. Speci cally, we work in an e ective theory where the top quark is assumed to be in nitely heavy and all other quarks are considered to be massless. Our result is the rst exact formula for a partonic hadron collider cross section at N3LO in perturbative QCD. Furthermore, our result is an analytic computation of a hadron collider cross section involving elliptic integrals. We derive numerical predictions for the Higgs boson cross section at the LHC. Previously this result was approximated by an expansion of the cross section around the production threshold of the Higgs boson and we compare our ndings. Finally, we study the impact of our new result on the state of the art prediction for the Higgs boson cross section at the LHC. Higgs Physics; Perturbative QCD - HJEP05(218) 1 Introduction Set-Up 2 3 4 5 6 Calculation of coe cient functions 3.1 3.2 Computation of matrix elements An elliptic integral in Higgs production 3.3 Iterated integrals 3.4 Analytic solution for partonic coe cient functions Results Conclusions Comparison with results based on a threshold expansion A The elliptic integral B Various ingredients for Higgs boson production With the discovery of the Higgs boson [1, 2] at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN we have entered a new era of particle physics phenomenology. With conclusive evidence for the existence of the Higgs boson the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics has become a self consistent theory. It explains the mechanism of electro-weak symmetry breaking, the origin of elementary particle masses and it allows to derive concise predictions to energies far beyond current experimental reach. The SM is however a phenomenologically incomplete theory and needs to be extended to obtain a satisfying description of all known physics. Higgs boson measurements will provide a unique window to deepen our understanding of fundamental interactions and to stringently test possible extensions of our current knowledge. The inclusive cross section for the production of a Higgs boson represents a prototypical example of experimental and theoretical synergy. Its role in the extraction of fundamental coupling constants is key and it provides an invaluable tool to discover potential deviations from the SM. Experimentally it can be determined at the LHC to astounding precision. In order to exploit the full potential of LHC phenomenology experimental precision must be matched by equally precise theoretical prediction. { 1 { The dominant production mechanism of a Higgs boson at the LHC is gluon fusion. In comparison with other processes perturbative QCD corrections to the gluon fusion cross section are large. In order to match current and future experimental precision this simple fact demands computation of this process to very high order in perturbation theory. Nextto-leading oder (NLO) [3{6] corrections to this process are available since more than two decades. Corrections at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) were computed in refs [7{9] in an e ective theory (EFT) of QCD where the top quark is considered to have in nite mass and all other quarks are massless [10{13]. In ref. [14] next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N3LO) corrections were computed in terms of an expansion around the production threshold of the Higgs boson. This result marked the rst computation of a Hadron collider observable to this order in perturbation theory. At the desired level of precision the inclusion of many sub-dominant e ects, such as electro-weak corrections and quark mass e ects, in a prediction for the hadron collider observable are essential. Furthermore, a critical assessment of all sources of uncertainties is required. A comprehensive study achieving this goal was performed in ref. [15] and resulted in the state of the art prediction for LHC measurements (see also refs. [16, 17]). In this article we go beyond the previous approximation of the N3LO corrections to the Higgs boson gluon fusion cross section in the EFT in terms of a threshold expansion and compute it exactly. Our calculation strongly relies on various ingredients already entering the computation of ref. [14]. Speci cally, we require matrix elements integrated over phase space for the production of the Higgs boson in association with up to three partons and involving up to three loops. Purely virtual corrections were computed in refs. [18, 19]. Contributions with one parton in the nal state and two loops were calculated in refs. [20{24]. Matrix elements involving two nal state partons and one loop (RRV) or tree level matrix elements with three nal state partons (RRR) were computed for the purposes of refs. [14, 25{27] in terms of a threshold expansion. Furthermore, our result relies on infrared subtraction terms formed out of convolutions [28, 29] of splitting functions [30, 31] and an ultraviolet counter term based on lower loop amplitudes [32]. Both were already computed for the purpose of ref. [14]. In order to obtain our result we compute N3LO corrections to the partonic cross section due to RRV and RRR matrix elements. The integration over the loop and nal state momenta involves complicated, high-dimensional integrals. In order to facilitate our computation we employ the framework of reverse unitarity [7, 33{36] that allows to relate phase space integrals to cuts of loop integrals. Subsequently, we employ powerful loop integration techniques to actually compute our phase space integrals. In particular, we make use of integration-by-part identities [37, 38] in order to express our integrated matrix elements in terms of a limited set of master integrals. We then proceed to compute these master integrals using the framework of di erential equations [39{41]. The solution of di erential equations requires the calculation of one boundary condition per master integral. To obtain these boundary conditions we perform an expansion of every master integral in terms of a threshold expansion. We then match the individual terms in the expansion to so-called soft master integrals that were explicitly computed in refs. [42, 43]. { 2 { When solving di erential equations for RRR master integrals we encounter an obstruction in the form of 2 2 systems of di erential equations that cannot be solved by conventional means. The solution to these systems is given in terms of elliptic integrals. The appearance of elliptic integrals in the computation of Feynman integrals is well established [44{52] but still poses a considerable challenge. The majority of known analytic results for Feynman integrals can be expressed in terms of iterated integrals referred to as generalised poly logarithms [53]. A profound understanding of their analytic properties [53{57] has been key to the success of higher order perturbation theory. The quest for a similar understanding of iterated integrals involving elliptic functions is subject of ongoing research and has already produced vast literature [58{78]. In particular, methods to nd solutions for di erential equations, the understanding of functional relations among such integrals and their analytic continuation from one kinematic regime to another are of importance. In this article we present our pragmatic solution to the problem at hand and produce a hadron collider cross section that involves the analytic treatment of an Having obtained analytic results for all required matrix elements with di erent parton multiplicity in the nal states we combine them to form the exact correction to the partonic Higgs boson production cross section at N3LO. We then convolute our newly obtained result and all required lower order cross section with parton distribution function in order to derive physical predictions for hadron collider cross sections. We study in detail the deviations of our results from the previous approximation of the N3LO cross section [14, 15]. Our computation allows us to remove one source of uncertainty due to the truncation of the threshold expansion from the state of the art prediction for the Higgs boson production cross section [15] and we update the previous result. This article is structured as follows: in section 2 we setup the notation for our computation of the inclusive Higgs boson production cross section. Next, we discuss in detail the analytic computation of the missing RRV and RRR coe cient functions in section 3. We outline the general computational framework in section 3.1. We discuss the treatment of elliptic integrals found when solving di erential equations in section 3.2. In section 3.3 we introduce a class of iterated integrals that serve as the main building blocks for our nal result. Next, we describe the structure of our analytic results in section 3.4. In section 4 we present numerical results for the EFT Higgs boson cross section through N3LO in QCD perturbation theory. We compare our new results to previous predictions obtained with a threshold expansion in section 5. Finally, we draw our conclusions in section 6. 2 Set-Up Higgs boson. In this article we consider scattering processes of two protons that produce at least a Proton(P1) + Proton(P2) ! H(ph) + X; (2.1) P1 and P2 are the momenta of the colliding protons and ph the momentum of the Higgs { 3 { boson. The master formula for the inclusive Higgs boson production cross section is given by z ^ij (z; m2h): Here, we employed the parton model and factorization of long and short range interactions into parton distribution functions fi(x) and partonic cross sections. The momenta of the colliding partons are related to the proton momenta by p1 = x1P1 and p2 = x2P2 = x1z P2. We de ne = z = m2h S m2h s ; ; S = (P1 + P2)2: s = (p1 + p2)2: The sum over i and j ranges over all contributing partons. Furthermore, we de ne the variable z = 1 z. The partonic Higgs cross section is given by ^ij (z; m2h). In this article we compute the partonic cross section through N3LO in perturbative QCD in an e ective theory where the top quark is in nitely heavy and has been integrated out [10{13]. In this theory the Higgs boson is coupled directly to gluons via an e ective operator of dimension ve [79{82], Le = LSM;5 4 SM Lagrangian with nf = 5 massless quark avours. The Wilson coe cient C0 is obtained by matching the e ective theory to the full SM in the limit where the top quark is in nitely heavy. Within the e ective theory, we can write the partonic cross section as 1 z ^ij (z; m2h) = (C0)2 ^0 ij (z) = (C0)2 ^0 1 X n=0 0 n S i(jn)(z): Dividing out the Born cross section, we can write the bare partonic coe cient functions as, The initial state dependent prefactors Nij are given by Ngg = 4(1 Ngq = Nqg = Nqq = Nqq = NqQ = 1)2 1 1 )(nc2 4nc2 ; : 1)nc ; 1 )2(nc2 4(1 { 4 { (2.2) (2.3) (2.4) (2.5) (2.6) (2.7) (2.8) Here, g, q, q and Q indicate that the initial state parton is a gluon, quark, anti-quark or quark of di erent avour than q respectively. d H+m is the phase space measure for the production of a Higgs boson and m partons and is explained in more detail below. Sn in the coupling constant expansion of the modulus squared of all amplitudes for partons i and j producing a nal state Higgs boson and m partons summed over polarizations and colors. To compute the nth order partonic coe cient functions we require all combinations l-loop matrix elements with m external particles such that m + l = n. The occurring loop amplitudes are plagued by ultraviolet divergencies which we regulate using dimensional regularisation and work in d = 4 2 space-time dimensions. We matrix elements with xed parton multiplicity in the nal state are separately infrared divergent. These infrared divergences are canceled by summing over all contributing squared matrix elements and performing a suitable rede nition of the parton distribution functions. The resulting partonic cross section is free of divergencies and we refer to the corresponding partonic coe cient function as ij (z). Various de nitions regarding renormalisation and mass factorisation can be found in appendix B. The cross section, eq. (2.2), can be written in terms of nite partonic coe cient functions and physical parton distribution functions fiR as (2.9) (2.10) The partonic coe cient functions can be split into two contributions i(jn)(z) = ij (n); SV(z) + i(jn); reg.(z): The term ij (n); SV(z) is comprised of distributions that act on parton distribution functions. The super-script SV signi es that this term represents so-called soft-virtual contributions that arise from kinematic con gurations where any parton produced in conjunction with Higgs boson is soft. The coe cient ij ( 3 ); SV(z) was computed in ref. [26] and con rmed by ij ref. [27]. The coe cient functions i(j3); reg.(z) represent the so-called regular contributions. Their functional form was approximated with a power series in 1 z in refs. [14, 25, 36]. The main result of this article is the complete computation of the coe cient functions ( 3 ); reg.(z). We supply this result in a machine readable format in an ancillary le together with the arXiv submission of this article. 3 Calculation of coe cient functions In order to obtain the partonic coe cient functions i(j3)(z) we require contributions arising from matrix elements with up to three loops (l 3) and up to three partons (m 3) in the nal state such that 3 = l + m. The purely virtual matrix elements were computed in refs. [18, 19]. Matrix elements with two loops and one emission were computed in refs. [20{24]. Matrix elements with two real emissions and one loop (RRV) and three { 5 { d H+m = where real emissions (RRR) are so-far publicly only available in terms of the rst two expansion terms in the expansion around the production threshold of the Higgs bosons [42, 43]. In this article we complete the computation of the N3LO coe cient functions. We start by outlining the strategy involved in this computation. Next, we explain the treatment of an ellitpic integral that is part of the RRR coe cient functions. We introduce a class of iterated integrals that serve as building blocks of our partonic coe cient functions. Finally, we obtain the N3LO coe cient functions and describe their structure. 3.1 Computation of matrix elements In order to obtain RRV and RRR coe cient functions we start by generating all required Feynman diagrams with QGRAF [83]. Next, we perform spinor and colour algebra in a private c++ code based on GiNaC [84]. With this we obtain the loop and phase space integrand for our partonic coe cient functions. Next, we want to perform the inclusive integral of our integrands over all loop momenta and nal state parton momenta. The phase space measure for producing a Higgs boson and m partons is given by (d2dp)hd (2 ) +(p2h m2h)(2 )d d p1 + p2 + ph + m+2 X pi i=3 i=3 ! m+2 (d2dp)id (2 ) +(pi2); Y They satisfy the condition We can now apply integration-by-part (IBP) identities [37, 38] on our combined loop and phase-space integrands. A private c++ implementation of the Laporta algorithm [85] allows us to express our partonic coe cient functions in terms of a limited set of master integrals. To compute these master integrals we work with the method of di erential { 6 { +(p2 m2) = ( p 0 m) (p2 m2): All nal state momenta are chosen in-going such that the energy component in the above equation appears with a minus sign. In order to perform the loop and phase space integration we employ the framework of reverse unitarity [7, 33{36] that allows to treat phase space and loop integrals on equal footing. In particular, we represent the on-shell constraints in terms of cut propagators. The subscript c serves as a reminder that this propagator is cut. Cut propagators can be di erentiated just like normal propagators. +(p2 m2) ! p2 1 1 m2 c d 1 1 a dx f (x) c = a f (x) c a+1 df (x) dx : f (x) c a f (x)b = < : 8 h 1 ia b f(x) c 0 ; if a > b ; if b a : (3.1) (3.2) (3.3) (3.4) (3.5) (3.6) (3.7) equations [39{41]. This method allows to derive a system of partial di erential equations for a vector of our master integrals I~(z) of the form Here, I~(z) is a vector of n master integrals and A(z; ) is a n n matrix with ratios of polynomials in z and as entries. In order to have a complete system of di erential equations we de ne 550 and 362 master integrals for RRR and RRV respectively. The commonly used strategy to solve such di erential equations is to nd a n n A0(z; )I~0(z): T: Here, A0(z; ) is holomorphic in as ! 0. Having obtained such a form the solution for our master integrals can be easily expressed in terms of a Laurent series in by " I~0(z) = I + Z z dz0A0(z0; ) + 2 Z z Z z0 dz0 dz00A0(z0; )A0(z00; ) + : : : I~0 : 0 (3.8) # Here, I~00 represents a vector of boundary conditions that has to be determined by other means. For the RRV and RRR master integrals such a boundary condition is easily obtained by matching the full solution obtained in eq. (3.8) to an expansion of the required integrals I~(z) around the point z = 1 that can be performed by means presented in refs. [42, 43]. The art in solving di erential equations rests in nding an adequate transformation matrix T . For certain di erential equations in a single parameter an algorithmic solution exists [86{89] and was nicely formulated in ref. [89]. This method applies if a transformation matrix can be found that is comprised of ratios of polynomials in the parameters z and . For a large subset of integrals in our vector of master integrals I~ such transformations can be found and we rely on a private implementation of the algorithm outlined in ref. [89] to do so. For another large class of master integrals it is necessary to nd a transformation matrix that contains square roots of polynomials of our parameter z. For these cases we can nd the desired transformation by nding suitable algebraic variable transformations that rationalises the square roots involved. Once the roots are rationalised we can again employ the aforementioned algorithm. We point out that this procedure is not particularly algorithmic but leads to a desired solution fairly easily. We encounter a further obstruction when solving di erential equations for the system of RRR master integrals. This obstruction involves the presence of elliptic integrals and we elaborate on our solution in the following section. { 7 { p1 (3.11) ! 0. (a) (b) N3LO. The computation of these integrals involves elliptic integrals. Solid lines represent Feynman propagators. Solid lines crossed by the dashed line correspond to cut-propagators. The doubled line represents the on-shell constraint of the Higgs boson. HJEP05(218) 3.2 An elliptic integral in Higgs production When solving di erential equations for master integrals contributing to the triple real coe cient functions of Higgs boson production at N3LO we encounter two coupled 4 4 systems of di erential equations that we could not decouple order by order in the dimensional regulator by conventional means. In this section we discuss the di erential equations in question and present our solution. In gure 1 we display two scalar phase space integrals. Let us choose four master integrals with the same propagators as the scalar integral in gure 1(b). Ei = Z These four integrals satisfy a system of di erential equations of the form The vector ~y(z) represents the inhomogeneous part of the di erential equation. The matrix A1(z; ) in the homogeneous part of the di erential equation is holomorphic in as The homogeneous part of the di erential equation that does not decouple as ! 0 is given { 8 { by the matrix A0(z) = BBB 0 11 2z 3 z z2 11z 1 0 0 z2 11z 1 0 0 0 1 C C : C A 0 0 1 z = 0 two of the master integrals decouple and we are left with a 2 2 system for the homogeneous solution of the di erential equation. E0 ! 4 E0 1 = AT : = 0: (3.12) (3.13) We show in appendix A that the functions tij (z) can be written in terms of complete elliptic integrals and pre-factors. However, this solution is quite unwieldy and we choose another approach here. For all practical purposes it is su cient to simply de ne the functions tij (z) to be the solution to the di erential equation eq. (3.14). The homogeneous di erential equations for the master integrals E10 and E40, de ned by E1 = t22E10 + t21E40; E4 = t11E40 + t12E10; are decoupled as we send ! 0. The inhomogeneity can then be decoupled order by order by in by standard techniques. A general solution for the di erential equations can subsequently be found as illustrated by eq. (3.8). The second set of master integrals that have the same propagators as the scalar integral depicted in gure 1(a) can be chosen in such a way that the homogeneous part of their di erential equations takes identically the same form as the one already discussed. Therefor we can apply the same transformation matrix to decouple the system order by order in . With this we found a transformation matrix T that allows us to express the di erential equations for all master integrals required for RRV and RRR contributions to Higgs production at N3LO in the desired form, eq. (3.7). In order to derive numerical results for the functions tij we can solve the di erential equations eq. (3.14) in terms of a generalised power series ansatz using the Frobenius method. Consider for example an ansatz for the solution of the system of di erential { 9 { equations as an expansion around z = 0 and z = 1. tij (z) = tij (z) = 1 X znbi(jn): n=0 1 n=0 X znci(jn) + log(z) X di(jn)zn: 1 n=0 (3.16) (3.18) (3.19) We derived the required structure of our ansatz by regarding the asymptotic solution of the di erential equations around the considered expansion points. Here, ti0j and ti1j are some numerical boundary constants. Inserting the ansaetze into the system of di erential equations we nd the following b(1n1+2) = By comparison to the asymptotic solution given in eq. (3.17) we nd all starting conditions for the solution to the recurrence relations. Speci cally, we nd the conditions bi(jn) = ci(jn) = di(jn) = 0 if n < 0 and d(201) = 0 and d(101) = c(201). Furthermore, the general solution for t22 is identical to the solution for t21 and the one for t12 is identical to the solution for t11 up to the choice of boundary constants. Any choice of boundary conditions will lead to a transformation matrix that satis es the di erential equations eq. (3.14). The only restriction we impose is that the transformation has to be invertible, i.e. that det(TE ) 6= 0. In accordance with this criterium we make z = z = 1 2 1 2 p Consequently, the power series of the functions tij (z) around the point z = 1 has a radius of convergence r1 = 1. Similarly, the power series around the point z = 0 has radius of conp vergence r0 = j 12 11 on the interval z 2 (0; j 12 11 5 5 j. The domains of convergence for the two power series overlap 5 5 j). In order to determine the boundary constants ti0j in terms of the ti1j we rst compute the truncated power series around both limits under consideration for each tij (z). Next, we evaluate both series for each tij (z) at a point within the interval z 2 (0; j 12 11 5 5 j). Equating the results allows us to establish a relation among the constants ti0j and ti1j up to a small, numerical remainder. The remainder can be systematically improved upon by increasing the truncation order of the power series. Let us brie y introduce a simple method of estimating the size of the remainder of the truncated series. Suppose a function f (x) is given by the convergent series the following choice for the asymptotic solution of the di erential equation: t111 = t122 = 0 and t112 = t121 = 1. We nd that with this choice the determinant of the transformation matrix is given to all orders in z by t11t22 Fixing the asymptotic behaviour of the functions tij (z) in one limit automatically determines their behaviour at any other point. Computing the explicit values for ti0j explicitly given the choice we made for ti1j is however a non-trivial task. At this point it is useful to re ect on the practical aim of our computation. We desire a solution that is numerically su ciently precise to determine the complete N3LO coe cient functions for values of z in the interval [0; 1] as required for cross section predictions. In this light our solution for the tij (z) should allow for the desired precision and should be improvable if necessary. This can be achieved by computing an approximation based on a truncated power series. The regular singular points of our 2 2 system of di erential equations (3.14) are located at the following values. jai+mj = rimjaij: If we truncate the series before order N its remainder would be given by Suppose that asymptotically the ratio of to consecutive coe cients remains constant. (3.21) (3.22) (3.23) (3.24) Under this assumption we can estimate the modulus of the remainder to be bounded by jR(f (x); x; N )j jaN jx 1 i=0 N X(rN x)i = aN xN 1 rN x = Rest(f (x); x; N ): (3.25) Note, that the series converges for jrN xj < 1. In order to obtain su ciently high precision for our coe cient functions we perform an expansion of the functions tij around the expansion points z = 0, z = 1 and z = 12 . For each expansion we compute several hundred terms and match the boundary conditions within the overlaps of the domains of convergence. Estimating the remainder of the power series expansion at our matching points suggests that we can easily determine the boundary values with a relative accuracy of 10 42 or better if needed. In addition to estimating the remainder as described above we evaluate the di erent power series for the same tij for several points in the intervals where all series converge and only observe relative deviations at levels smaller than 10 42. In order to further study the convergence of our power series approximation we may regard the asymptotic behaviour of the recurrence relations given in eq. (3.18) and eq. (3.19) as n ! 1. We see that asymptotically b(1n1) approaches a constant and c(1n1) and d(1n1) tend towards zero. For the other coe cients we nd the asymptotic solutions b(2n1) = c(2n1) = d(2n1) = 9 22 11 2 11 2 are smaller than one. The number 5 5 is larger than one. From this we again p 22 5 5 and p z < 1= in eq. (3.25). draw the conclusion that the power series around the expansion point z = 1 is convergent everywhere within the unit interval. The power series around z = 0 is convergent if of the procedure to estimate the remainder of the power series truncated at order N de ned 5 5 . This asymptotic analysis also supports the validity Z z 0 In this section we brie y introduce a class of iterated integrals [90] that is particularly convenient to express the solution of di erential equations as in eq. (3.8). We de ne HJEP05(218) J (!~; z) = J (!n(z); : : : ; !1(z); z) = dz0!n(z0)J (!n 1(z0); : : : ; !1(z0); z0); (3.28) with J (z) = 1: We refer to one !i(z) as a letter and to an ordered set of letters, f!n(z); : : : ; !1(z)g that de nes an iterated integral as a word. Many well known classes of iterated integrals, such as harmonic poly logarithms (HPLs) [91] or generalised poly logarithms (GPLs) [53], that are widely used in particle physics, are sub-classes of this type of iterated integrals. For example the GPLs are The presence of the elliptic integrals tij (z) in the solution of our di erential equations does not allow for a solution purely in terms of GPLs. For this reason it becomes necessary to de ne an extension of GPLs in this article. Already several generalisations of GPLs to accommodate elliptic functions exist in the literature (see for example [62, 73, 74, 92{94]). In the following we review several properties of iterated integrals (see for example [55{57, 95]). Iterated integrals form a so-called shu e algebra. J (!n(z); : : : ; !1(z); z) J (!n+m(z); : : : ; !n+1(z); z) = J (! (n+m)(z); : : : ; ! (1)(z); z); X 2 (n;m) where (n; m) denotes the set of all shu es of n + m elements, i.e., the subset of the symmetric group Sn+m de ned by (n; m) = f 2 Sn+mj 1(n) < : : : < 1(1) and 1(n + m) < : : : < (3.30) 1(n + 1)g : (3.31) For example, consider the product of two iterated integrals with two integrations each. J (a; b; z)J (c; d; z) = J (a; b; c; d; z) + J (a; c; b; d; z) + J (a; c; d; b; z) +J (c; a; b; d; z) + J (c; a; d; b; z) + J (c; d; a; b; z): (3.32) Here the letters a, b, c and d may be generic functions of z. Special care needs to be taken if the integrand of our iterated integrals diverges at the value of the lower integration bound. In this article we only consider simple poles of the { 13 { integrand at the end points since they simply are the only type of divergence that appears in the computation we are interested in. Speci cally, we de ne the case where all letters of a word of lenght n are given by !(z) = z1 then 1 z 1 z J ; : : : ; ; z = 1 n! logn(z): If the letter z1 appears in the right-most entry of the word of an iterated integral we de ne it in a way that is consistent with the shu e algebra. Consider the shu e relation ; z J (!n(z); : : : ; !1(z); z) = J !n(z); : : : ; !1(z); ; z + J !n(z); : : : ; ; !1(z); z + : : : : 1 z 1 z Z 1 z 0 Z z 1 1 z f (z) f (0) z ; z 1 z (3.33) (3.34) (3.35) Here, the ellipsis indicates all other terms arising from the shu e product. Assuming that all !i(z) in the above equation are holomorphic as z ! 0 the only iterated integral with an end-point divergence is the rst on the right hand side of the equation. We de ne our iterated integrals to be regulated in such cases such that the above equation holds true. Solving for the iterated integral in question we nd J !n(z); : : : ; !1(z); ; z = log(z)J (!n(z); : : : ; !1(z); z) J !n(z); : : : ; ; !1(z); z + : : : If the right-most letter is divergent as z ! 0 but has the form f(zz) , with f(z) being holomorphic around z = 0, then we may regularise our function by writing it as f (z) z J !n(z); : : : ; !1(z); ; z The last line of the above equation is then regulated as discussed above. If several rightmost letters have poles at the lower end point of the integration we simply iterate the above procedure. We want to be able to rewrite an elliptic integral with argument z in terms of iterated integrals with argument z = 1 by regarding a transformation from z to z. z or w = 12 z. Let us illustrate how this can be achieved J (!n(z); : : : ; !1(z); z) = dz0!n(z0)J (!n 1(z0); : : : ; !1(z0); z) dz0!n(1 z0)J (!n 1(1 z0); : : : ; !1(1 dz0!n(1 z0)J (!n 1(1 z0); : : : ; !1(1 z0); 1 z0); 1 z0) z0) + dz0!n(1 z0)J (!n 1(1 z0); : : : ; !1(1 z0); 1 z0): (3.37) The last line in the above equation is a numerical constant. In order to write the integral in the penultimate line in terms of an iterated integral with upper integration bound z we have to rst rewrite the iterated integral in the integrand with an upper integration bound z0. To do this we simply apply the above equation iteratively to the integrand. Notice, that the above procedure may be ill de ned if the integrand we are considering is divergent at any of the end points. This case is easily avoided by shu e regulating both end points prior to applying eq. (3.37). Let us demonstrate this step with a well known example. Consider the iterated integral J 1 ; z 1 1 z ; z = J = 1 z ; z J log(z) log(1 1 z z) ; z J J 1 1 1 1 1 ; ; z z z 1 ; ; z z z In the above equation we employed a shu e identity such that right most letter of the function is regular at the new lower integration point z = 1 and that the left most letter is regular at the new end point z = 0. We now may write 1 1 1 z0 z0 ; z0 ; z0 2 6 : Z z 0 Z z 0 = = = J 1 dz0 1 1 z0 dz0 J 1 ; z 1 1 z0 J z 1 ; z = dz0 Z z 0 0 log(z0) 1 1 z0 dz0 J z0 1 log(z) log(1 z) + 1 z0 ; z0 2 6 : Combining the the results of eq. (3.38) and eq. (3.39) we nd the famous di-Logarithm identity. J 1 ; z 1 1 z ; z = J 1 ; z 1 1 z ; z In this example it was possible to determine the integration constant to be 62 analytically. If this is not possible the constant can also be determined numerically with nite precision by simply evaluating the function under consideration before and after variable transformation numerically for any value of z. The iterated integral representation of eq. (3.28) allows to easily compute truncated power series expansions for the iterated integrals. For example J 1 1 z ; z = Z z dz0 z = By proceeding iteratively we can easily compute the power series in z for any iterated integral to arbitrary power. In order to obtain compact expressions for our analytic results it is of importance to be able to derive functional relations among our iterated integrals. One of the big advantages of GPLs is that their functional relations are well studied (see for example [53, 55{57, 96]). The case of generic iterated integrals is not understood at the same level. In ref. [62] it was (3.38) (3.39) (3.40) (3.41) outlined how relations among iterated integrals involving elliptic functions can be found using IBP identities. Here, we proceed di erently. First, note that our nal analytic result will be a linear combination of iterated integrals functions. relation c1J 7 60 we nd can be satis ed for some ci 6= 0 for arbitrary values of z. The coe cients ai(z) and corresponding iterated integrals J (!~i; z) are understood to be identical to those appearing in our nal result. In order to determine the unknown coe cients ci we expand eq. (3.43) in z. Every coe cient of every power in z has to vanish separately in order for the equation to be satis ed. This allows us to build a system of equations that is large enough to solve for the unknown coe cients ci. If we nd a certain linear combination of iterated integrals and coe cients that cannot be constrained with this procedure we found a relation of Let us illustrate the procedure with a trivial example. Consider the simple shu e 1 ; 1 z 1 + z 1 ; z + c2J 1 1 + z 1 ; 1 z ; z + c3J 1 1 z ; z J 1 1 + z ; z = 0; (3.44) and let us pretend we do not know already know the coe cients ci. After expanding in z and pre-factors ai(z), then the equation If there are relations among di erent iterated integrals appearing in this linear combination X ai(z)J (!~i; z): i X ciai(z)J (!~i; z) = 0; i ; ci 2 Q; (3.42) (3.43) We can now create a system of equations by regarding each coe cient in z separately. Technically, we want to nd the kernel of the system of equations. We nd that the kernel for our example is spanned by the vector fc1; c1; c1gT . This means we found the shu e identity 1 1 J ; 1 z z + 1 ; z + J 1 z + 1 1 ; 1 z ; z J 1 1 z 1 z + 1 ; z J ; z = 0: (3.47) Of course this procedure only guarantees that the so-found relations are satis ed up to the order in z at which we truncate our power series. However, we may convince ourselves that the relations are correct by computing as many higher order terms as are to our liking. A more involved example of such an identity is given by J t11; 1 Analytic solution for partonic coe cient functions In the previous sections we described how we derive di erential equations for all master integrals required for RRR and RRV partonic coe cient functions. Furthermore, we outlined how we nd a suitable transformation matrix that transforms the di erential equations into the form of eq. (3.7). Once, this form is obtained the solution to the di erential equations can be conveniently written as in equation eq. (3.8). Iterated integrals as given in eq. (3.28) are particularly suited to represent this solution. Once we calculated all master integrals and computed all boundary conditions we simply insert the master integrals into our IBP reduced matrix elements and obtain the desired result for the partonic coe cient functions. In this section we describe the structure of our nal result for the partonic coe cient functions. The set of all letters, the so-called alphabet, that appear in the iterated integrals that constitute the Higgs boson cross section at N3LO is given by 1; 1 1 1 1 1 z ; z ; z + 1 ; pz ; p 4 1 p ; z z 1 1 z ; p p z z + 4 ; p t11; t12; t21; t22; 1 t11 ; t11 ; t11 ; t12 ; t12 ; t12 ; t21 ; t22 : z z z + 1 1 z z z + 1 z z p z p z z + 4 1 ; p4z + 1 ; p4z + 1 z ; (3.49) Note, that the alphabet required to describe all our master integrals individually contains additional letters that drop out in the nal expression. The partonic coe cient functions are comprised of iterated integrals with up to ve letters. Typically we nd that there are several thousand di erent iterated integrals in each partonic coe cient function. Applying the procedure outlined in the previous section to nd functional identities among these integrals we nd that we can express them in terms of only 365 di erent iterated integrals that cannot be re-written as GPLs in a straight forward fashion. Out of those 188 have letters containing elliptic integrals tij . For the remaining ones a representation in terms of GPLs may exist. Having derived moderately compact expressions for our coe cient functions we want to nd a method to evaluate them numerically. The conceptually simplest way to evaluate the iterated integrals is to perform every integral numerically. The fact that all our integrals are real valued and are nite renders this approach straight forward. Integrating 5 dimensional integrals numerically is however not particularly fast if a certain level of precision is desired. As an alternative, we want to represent the entire partonic coe cient functions in terms of power series expansions. Let us rst investigate for which values of z we can perform a convergent series expansion. In order to extract this information we regard all singularities and branch points that occur in our alphabet and the algebraic factors of our coe cient functions. We nd that they are located at values of z of 1 2 p Here, we included the regular singular points of the di erential equations of the elliptic sector, eq. (3.13). In order to evaluate our functions to high precision within the physical interval, z 2 [0; 1], we decide to perform a power series expansion around the points z = 1, z = 12 and z = 0. The associated radii of convergence are then r1 = 1, r 1 = 12 and 2 To obtain a series expansion around our three di erent expansion points we perform an expansion of all iterated integrals as outlined in the previous section. As the default upper bound for our iterated integrals is the parameter z the expansion around the point z = 1 can be carried out simply by expanding the iterated integrals at the integrand level and integrating subsequently as demonstrated in eq. (3.41). In order to obtain an expansion around z = 0 and z = 12 we rst re-express our iterated integrals in terms of iterated integrals with upper integration bound z and 1=2 z respectively. As outlined in section 3.3 this procedure requires us to determine certain integration constants which we obtain numerically by matching series expansions around di erent expansion points. To ensure that the numerical error introduced by truncating series expansions is su ciently small we estimate it as explained in eq. (3.25). We expand the coe cient of every iterated integral in the partonic coe cient function separately around each of our three expansion points and combine the result with the expansion for the iterated integrals. In order to obtain numerical values for the coe cient z = 1 at O((1 z)50), the expansion around z = 12 at O ( 1 2 functions within the unit interval of z we evaluate the expansion around z = 1 in the interval z 2 [0:75; 1], the expansion around z = 12 in the interval z 2 113 ; 0:75 and the expansion around z = 0 in the interval z 2 0; 113 . We truncate the expansion around z)200 and the expansion around z = 0 at O z100 . Using the estimator introduced in eq. (3.25) we nd that this approximates the coe cient functions at any point in the unit interval to a relative numerical precision of 10 10 or better. This is supported by evaluating the di erent expansions for several points within the overlaps of their respective domains of convergence and calculating their di erence. The numerical precision may of course be improved arbitrarily by simply including more terms in the respective series expansions. 1500 -500 -10000. z function of the parameter z. The gg coe cient function was rescaled uniformly by a factor of 10 2. 4 In the previous sections we calculated analytic results for the partonic coe cient functions i(j3)(z). Our analytic results agree with the power series around z = 1 for the same functions obtained in refs. [14, 15]. The leading behaviour of the coe cient functions as z ! 0 was correctly predicted in ref. [97]. The coe cient function q(3Q) was calculated already in ref. [98] and agrees with our result. We derived a representation of the coe cient functions in terms of power series expansions that is particularly useful for numerical evaluation. In this section we present numerical results for the Higgs boson production cross section through N3LO. Let us start by regarding the functional dependence of our coe cient functions. In gure 2 we display the shape of the regular coe cient functions for each distinct partonic initial state. The quark - gluon and and gluon-gluon initial state coe cient functions behave as log5(1 z) as we approach the value z = 1. The coe cient functions with two quarks in the initial state are tending towards zero in this limit. The limit z ! 0 is characterised by a power divergence and all coe cient functions behave as log5(z) . z In order to derive physical predictions for hadron collider phenomenology we need to convolute our partonic coe cient functions with parton distribution functions (PDF). Throughout this article we will use the PDF sets PDF4LHC15 [99]. We choose a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV and a top quark mass of mt(mt) = 162:7 GeV. We choose a value for the strong coupling constant of S(mZ = 91:1876 GeV) = 0:118. If not stated otherwise we derive numerical predictions for proton-proton collider with a center of mass energy of The gure displays the contribution of N3LO coe cient function to the Higgs boson production cross section for the gg (red), qg (green), qq (orange), qq(blue) and qQ(purple) initial state as a function of the perturbative scale . The gg and qg coe cient function were rescaled uniformly by a factor of 10 2. 13 TeV. We use a private c++ code to perform the numerical convolutions of PDFs and partonic coe cient functions. In gure 3 we display the impact of the N3LO corrections on the hadronic cross section for di erent initial states as a function of the perturbative scale . The gluon-gluon (red) and quark-gluon (blue) initial state contributions were rescaled by a factor of 10 2 in order to t nicely. We observe that the numerical impact of these two channels is clearly dominant over all other initial state con gurations. The nominally smallest corrections for each channel can be found in an interval of 2 [40; 90] GeV. In gure 4 we combine the contribution from all partonic coe cient functions and evaluate their contribution to the hadronic cross section including lower orders in perturbation theory as a function of the perturbative scale . We show LO, NLO, NNLO and N3LO predictions in green, orange, blue and red respectively. We observe that the dependence on the perturbative scale is greatly reduced at N3LO compared to lower orders. Furthermore, NNLO and N3LO predictions overlap within the interval of 2 m4h ; mh . To derive a concrete numerical prediction we choose the value of the cross section at = m2h . We vary the perturbative scale in the interval m4h ; mh in order to estimate the e ect of missing higher order corrections at N4LO and beyond. As can be seen from gure 4 this procedure is not conservative enough at leading and next-to-leading order. Regarding the progression of the series from NLO onward we observe convergent behaviour. The nominal size of the corrections is greatly reduced at each successive order. Uncertainty estimates based on scale variation overlap at NNLO and N3LO. LHC 13 TeV PDF4LHC15.0 P P -> H+X LO NNLO NLO N3LO HJEP05(218) 30 50 70 90 110 130 150 170 190 210 230 250 μ [GeV] . The green, orange, blue and red lines correspond to a prediction made by truncating the perturbative series at LO, NLO, NNLO and N3LO respectively. Our prediction for the Higgs boson production cross section at the LHC based on a computation in perturbative QCD in the large top quark mass limit through N3LO of P P !H+X = 45:18 0:13:148 pb = 45:18 pb 0:369:34%: (4.1) 5 Comparison with results based on a threshold expansion In ref. [14] N3LO corrections to the Higgs boson production cross section were computed using an approximation based on a power series around the point z = 1 truncated at O((1 z)30). The expansion around z = 1 exploits a kinematic enhancement of the gluon luminosity in the collision of protons for lower values of partonic center of mass energy to yield reliable predictions. The point z = 1 represents the production threshold for a Higgs boson, i.e. the lowest possible amount of energy required to produce a Higgs boson. In ref. [15] seven additional terms in the power series were added. The quality of a threshold expansion for N3LO corrections was furthermore studied in refs. [25, 26, 100]. Having now the complete coe cient functions at our disposal we want to re ect on previous estimates and compare our exact analytical ndings to the approximate results. Using the same set-up as in the previous section to derive numerical predictions we nd that the hadronic cross section through N3LO in perturbative QCD in the in nite top quark mass limit based on thirty terms in the threshold limit is given by P P !H+X Threshold-30 = 45:07 0:12:643 pb = 45:07 pb 0:358:23%: (5.1) We observe a di erence of 0:11 pb with respect to our new prediction, eq. (4.1). The scale variation interval in eq. (4.1) is slightly larger. In ref. [15] it was estimated the e ect of missing higher order terms in the threshold expansion are less than 0:18 pb. We now see that this estimate was su ciently conservative. In the remainder of this section we want to study the behaviour of N3LO corrections as a function of the order where the threshold expansion is truncated. In particular we want to investigate its performance for contributions arising from di erent partonic initial states. In gure 5 we show the N3LO correction due to di erent initial sate partons based on a threshold expansion (red) as a function of the order at which the expansion is truncated. In blue we also display our new result to all orders in the threshold expansion as a reference. We observe that the rst four terms show particularly large changes in the derived prediction. Starting from the fth term we observe slow asymptotic improvement towards the full result. The nominally largest gluon-gluon and quark-gluon channels are approximated better than their purely quark initiated counter parts. The sum of all channels can be seen in gure 5(f). In order to see more clearly the quality of the threshold expansion for each channel we show in gure 6 the impact of N3LO corrections on the hadronic cross section due to di erent partonic initial states. The predictions in red are now based on a threshold expansion normalised to the respective all order result. The x-axis shows the order at which the threshold expansion is truncated. The line in blue at one serves as a reference. We observe that contributions originating from the gluon-gluon channel are approximated within several per-mille including only a few terms in the expansion. Similarly the quark-gluon initiated contributions are approximated reasonably well below a level of ten percent. All other contributions are considerably di erent from the exact result and receive corrections of the order of 100% even with thirty terms in the expansion. Their nominal e ect on the inclusive cross section is however negligible. The fact that the threshold expansion works best for gluonic initial states can be explained by the fact that the probability to extract gluons from a proton is peaked towards lower momentum fractions, i.e. closer to the production threshold. For quarks this enhancement is not as large. The relatively slow improvement towards the exact result of the predictions as more and more terms in the threshold expansion are included can be understood from the high energy behaviour of the partonic coe cient functions. As we displayed in gure 2 the coe cient functions have a power like divergence log5(z) as z ! 0. While the threshold expansion is formerly z convergent within the entire physical interval a relatively slow convergence to capture the high energy behaviour can be expected. 6 Conclusions In this article we present an exact computation of the Higgs boson production cross section at hadron colliders through N3LO in perturbative QCD in the in nite top quark mass limit. The main result of this article are analytic formulae for N3LO corrections to the regular partonic coe cient functions. We provide these functions in an ancillary le together with the arXiv submission of this article. 3 ■ ●■ ■ ■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ 10 30 40 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ O L 3 g N g σ1 0 0.01 0.008 0. ● ● 0 ● ● ● ● ■ Ful O L 3 g N q σ-0.6 -0.8 O L 3 Nσ1 0 ● 0 10 30 40 Truncation Order ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Expansion ■ Ful 10 30 40 Truncation Order ■ Ful ■ Ful PDF4LHC15.0 The gure shows in red the contribution of the partonic coe cient function to the N3LO correction of the Higgs boson cross section approximated by a threshold expansion. The x-axis labels the order at which the expansion is truncated. The line in blue represents the contribution to all orders in the threshold expansion and is displayed as a reference. Figures (a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (f ) show the contribution due to the gg, qg, qq, qq, qQ initial state and the sum of all channels respectively. To obtain our result we compute matrix elements for the production of a Higgs boson in association with three partons at tree level and with two partons at the one-loop level. In order to perform required phase space integrals we employ the framework of reverse unitarity and make use of loop integration techniques such as IBP identities and master integrals. We compute all required master integrals using the framework of di erential equations. ■ ■ ■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ 20 (b) 10 30 40 ● ■ ■ ■ ■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ ●■ 10 30 40 20 (d) Truncation Order LHC 13 TeV PDF4LHC15.0 μ=125 GeV ● Expansion ■ Ful 10 30 40 20 (f) Truncation Order 0.99 0.9 3LO_ ,lFuq0.8 N q 0.9 l 0.8 u LO,F 3NqQ O L 3NqQ /σ0.7 σ0.6 0.5 ● ● ● 10 Truncation Order Truncation Order Truncation Order PDF4LHC15.0 ■ Ful ● Expansion ■ Ful LHC 13 TeV PDF4LHC15.0 3 g LO 3Nqg N/σq1.04 σ1.02 σ 0.96 ● 0.95 ■ Ful ● Expansion ■ Ful LHC 13 TeV PDF4LHC15.0 Truncation Order (d) 10 20 30 40 Truncation Order (f) ■ Ful /σ0.6 O L 3 q Nσq0.5 0.4 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● 40 10 20 30 40 1. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 1. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● correction of the Higgs boson cross section approximated by a threshold expansion normalised to the all order result. The x-axis labels the order at which the expansion is truncated. The line in blue represents the contribution to all orders in the threshold expansion and is displayed as a reference. Figures (a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (f) show the contribution due to the gg, qg, qq, qq, qQ initial state and the sum of all channels respectively. When solving di erential equations we encounter elliptic integrals in the solution for triple real radiation master integrals. We nd that an analytic solution for our master integrals can be easily found by embedding the solution of our di erential equations in a fairly general class of iterated integrals. We discuss in detail how we nd relations among iterated integrals involving elliptic functions and how we evaluate them e ciently numerically. 2 TeV 7 TeV 8 TeV 13 TeV 14 TeV 28 TeV 100 TeV +0:05pb 0:09pb +0:70pb 1:14pb +0:90pb 1:43pb +2:07pb 3:16pb +2:34pb 3:54pb +7:02pb 9:93pb +44:53pb 56:95pb +4:17% 8:02% +4:17% 6:76% +4:18% 6:69% +4:26% 6:48% +4:28% 6:46% +4:54% 6:42% +5:51% 7:05% (PDF) 0:03 pb ( 3:17%) 0:31 pb ( 1:89%) 0:40 pb ( 1:87%) 0:89 pb ( 1:85%) 1:00 pb ( 1:86%) 2:98 pb ( 1:96%) 19:98 pb ( 2:51%) +0:04pb 0:04pb +0:44pb 0:45pb +0:56pb 0:56pb +1:25pb 1:26pb +1:40pb 1:42pb +4:10pb 4:03pb +24:89pb 21:71pb +3:69% 3:36% +2:66% 2:68% +2:63% 2:66% +2:59% 2:62% +2:60% 2:62% +2:70% 2:65% +3:12% 2:72% Having obtained analytic expressions for all required partonic cross sections we embed them in a numerical code and derive predictions for hadron collider cross sections. We nd that N3LO corrections are small compared to corrections at previous orders and that the dependence on the perturbative scale is greatly reduced. We perform a detailed comparison with a previous approximation of N3LO corrections based on an expansion around the production threshold of the Higgs boson including 37 terms [14, 15]. We observe that our new results are in excellent agreement with this approximation. Dominant contributions due to gluon initiated partonic cross sections are approximated rather well by the threshold expansion. Quark initiated contributions on the other hand are approximated rather poorly. The estimate of missing higher orders in the threshold expansion in refs. [14, 15] was su ciently conservative to cover the di erence to the exact result. To derive precise predictions for hadron collider phenomenology many e ects beyond the e ective theory cross section considered in this article have to be take into account. The niteness of quark masses and neglected electro-weak e ects play an important role. It is particularly important to critically asses all non-negligible sources of uncertainty. A detailed study of the inclusive production cross section for the Higgs boson considering all such e ects was conducted in ref. [15]. Repeating this analysis is beyond the scope of this article. However, it easily possible to modify the nal predictions for hadron collider cross sections of ref. [15] such that the results of this article are taken into account. Speci cally, we include the exact contributions to the cross section at N3LO in the EFT and remove uncertainties due to the truncation of the threshold expansion. Otherwise, we can simply use the results of ref. [15] that are neatly combined in a new numerical code iHixs 2 [101]. In table 1 we show updated predictions for the gluon fusion Higgs boson production cross section at the LHC as in ref. [101]. HJEP05(218) Acknowledgments I would like to thank Babis Anastasiou, Claude Duhr, Falko Dulat and Franz Herzog for many invaluable discussions. I would like to thank Claude Duhr and Babis Anastasiou for useful comments on the manuscript. I am grateful to Lorenzo Tancredi and Stefan Weinzierl for useful discussions about elliptic integrals appearing in this computation. Furthermore, I would like to thank Achilleas Lazopoulos and Falko Dulat for comparisons of numerical results using the latest version of iHixs 2 [101]. My research was supported by the European Comission through the ERC Consolidator Grant HICCUP (No. 614577). A The elliptic integral In section 3.2 we discuss a coupled system of two di erential equations that describes the homogeneous solution to master integrals appearing in triple real radiation matrix elements when integrated over phase space. The particular system is given by HJEP05(218) E0 ! 4 E0 1 = 0 3 z E0 ! 4 E0 1 : Equivalently, we can say that E40 satis es a second order di erential equation. 3z2 z (z2 22z 11z 3) 11z 1) E40 = 0: E10 = z (A.1) (A.2) First, a solution to this di erential equation was found by Stefan Weinzierl in terms of an elliptic integral. The homogeneous part of a di erential equation for a Feynman integral has to be satis ed by the maximum cut of the corresponding Feynman integral. In refs. [75, 76] it was demonstrated how one can nd a solution for a coupled homogeneous part of a system di erential equations for Feynman integrals. In ref. [41] it was even proposed that it is su cient to normalise the leading singularities of Feynman integrals to constants in order to decouple their di erential equations order by order in the dimensional regulator. For this to hold true the physical linear combinations of leading singularities themselves must satisfy the homogeneous di erential equation for = 0. Computing the leading singularity of E4 we nd Leading Singularity (E4) Z z) x 3 z) (x3 x2z + 2x2 + 2xz + x x2z + 2x2 + 2xz + x z z) : (A.3) We can rewrite the quartic polynomial under the square root as x2z + 2x2 + 2xz + x z = (x r1)(x r2)(x r3)(x r4): (A.4) I1 = I2 = = Z r3 r2 Z r4 r3 p(r4 K(1 m): r2)(r3 r1) r1)(x r2)(x r3)(x r4) r1)(x r2)(x r3)(x r4) Following the prescription of ref. [59] we de ne two integrals 4 2 + 1 1 Here, K(m) is the complete elliptic integral of the rst kind. We nd that both integrals I1 and I2 are solutions to our second order di erential equation eq. (A.2). In principle we could now follow a procedure outlined in ref. [59] to construct a transformation matrix TE that allows us to decouple the system of di erential equations order by order in . Speci cally, we nd that the functions tij (z) de ned in section 3.2 are given by linear combinations ci 2 C: The derivatives of the functions I1 and I2 with respect to z yield a sum of elliptic integrals of rst and second kind with algebraic pre-factors. We can determine the coe cients ci analytically by equating the power series expansions of the above equation with the results obtained in section 3.2. However, any of these analytic expressions is quite unwieldy. (A.5) (B.1) Various ingredients for Higgs boson production In this appendix we summarise various standard ingredients for the perturbative calculation of the inclusive Higgs boson production cross section. In order to perform renormalisation in the MS scheme we substitute the bare coupling and Wilson coe cient as S0 = S( 2) C0 = CZC : e E Z : The renormalisation factors for the strong coupling constant and Wilson coe cient required for a computation through N3LO [19] are given by Z = 1 + ZC = 1 S S 0 0 30 + 6 2 2 0 1 + 2 3 2 + O( S4): 2 + O( S4): The coe cients at the various orders in the coupling constant i are given by the QCD beta function [102{105]. S S 2 1 1 6 3 Pi(k0) Pi(k0) Pk(j0) Pk(l0) 0Pi(j0) + 1 2 Pk(j1) 3 0Pi(k0) Pk(j0) + 2 02Pi(j0) Pi(k1) Pk(j0) + 2Pi(k0) 2 0Pi(j1) 2 1Pi(j0) + Pi(j2) : In order to obtain infrared nite cross sections we are required to perform a suitable rede nition of our parton distribution functions. Z 1 0 fi(x) = fiR g)(z) = dxdyf (x)g(y) (xy z): (B.3) The infrared counter term consists of convolutions [29] of splitting functions Pi(jn) [30, 31] and can be derived from the DGLAP equation. Its perturbative expansion required for an N3LO accurate calculation of the di erential Higgs boson production cross section is + log mt2 2 + O( S4 ) : (B.4) (B.5) In the e ective theory with nf light avours and the top quark decoupled from the running of the strong coupling constant, the MS-scheme Wilson coe cient reads [79{82] C( 2) = S 3 v S 11 4 6865 31104 mt2 2 2892659 41472 897943 9216 S 2 2777 288 55 54 3 + 77 1728 log 209 64 log mt2 2 log2 19 16 + log 1 18 mt2 2 log2 mt2 2 nf 40291 20736 110779 13824 3 nf 1733 288 log mt2 2 67 96 n 2 f mt2 2 This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits any use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited. [1] ATLAS collaboration, Observation of a new particle in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, Phys. Lett. B 716 (2012) 1 [arXiv:1207.7214] [INSPIRE]. 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Bernhard Mistlberger. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at N3LO in QCD, Journal of High Energy Physics, 2018, 28, DOI: 10.1007/JHEP05(2018)028