Advanced search    

Search: authors:"Amira Ben Amara"

9 papers found.
Use AND, OR, NOT, +word, -word, "long phrase", (parentheses) to fine-tune your search.

Monocyte Responses in the Context of Q Fever: From a Static Polarized Model to a Kinetic Model of Activation

Background. Q fever is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a bacterium that persists in M2-polarized macrophages. We wondered whether the concept of M1/M2 polarization is applicable to Q fever patients. Methods. Monocytes from healthy controls were cultured with IFN-γ and IL-4, agonists of M1 and M2 macrophages, respectively, and their gene expression was assessed using whole-genome ...

Evaluation of Current and New Biomarkers in Severe Preeclampsia: A Microarray Approach Reveals the VSIG4 Gene as a Potential Blood Biomarker

Preeclampsia is a placental disease characterized by hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant women, and it is associated with a high maternal and neonatal morbidity. However, circulating biomarkers that are able to predict the prognosis of preeclampsia are lacking. Thirty-eight women were included in the current study. They consisted of 19 patients with preeclampsia (13 with ...

Intracellular Bacteria Interfere with Dendritic Cell Functions: Role of the Type I Interferon Pathway

Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate host defenses against microorganisms. In infectious diseases due to intracellular bacteria, the inefficiency of the immune system to eradicate microorganisms has been attributed to the hijacking of DC functions. In this study, we selected intracellular bacterial pathogens with distinct lifestyles and explored the responses of monocyte-derived DCs ...

Chronic Hepatitis E Virus Infection Is Specifically Associated With an Interferon-Related Transcriptional Program

Background. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a new causative agent of chronic hepatitis in solid organ transplant recipients. Clinical studies suggest that the occurrence and persistence of chronic HEV infection are related to the immunological status of patients. Methods. We used whole-genome microarray and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to ...

Persistence of Coxiella burnetii, the Agent of Q Fever, in Murine Adipose Tissue

Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, is known to persist in humans and rodents but its cellular reservoir in hosts remains undetermined. We hypothesized that adipose tissue serves as a C. burnetii reservoir during bacterial latency. BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were infected with C. burnetii by the intraperitoneal route or the intracheal route. Adipose tissue was tested for the ...

The Gene Expression Analysis of Blood Reveals S100A11 and AQP9 as Potential Biomarkers of Infective Endocarditis

Background The diagnostic and prognostic assessments of infective endocarditis (IE) are challenging. To investigate the host response during IE and to identify potential biomarkers, we determined the circulating gene expression profile using whole genome microarray analysis. Methods and Results A transcriptomic case-control study was performed on blood samples from patients with ...

Global Analysis of Circulating Immune Cells by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

Background MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry is currently used in microbiological diagnosis to characterize bacterial populations. Our aim was to determine whether this technique could be applied to intact eukaryotic cells, and in particular, to cells involved in the immune response. Methodology/Principal Findings A comparison of frozen monocytes, T lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear ...

Pathogenic Brucellae Replicate in Human Trophoblasts

Brucellae replicate in a vacuole derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in epithelial cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In animals, trophoblasts are also key cellular targets where brucellae efficiently replicate in association with the ER. Therefore, we investigated the ability of Brucella spp. to infect human trophoblasts using both immortalized and primary ...

Coxiella burnetii, the Agent of Q Fever, Replicates within Trophoblasts and Induces a Unique Transcriptional Response

Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, an obligate intracellular bacterium typically found in myeloid cells. The infection is a source of severe obstetrical complications in humans and cattle and can undergo chronic evolution in a minority of pregnant women. Because C. burnetii is found in the placentas of aborted fetuses, we investigated the possibility that it could ...