Advanced search    

Search: authors:"Benjamin R. Underwood"

4 papers found.
Use AND, OR, NOT, +word, -word, "long phrase", (parentheses) to fine-tune your search.

An open-label study to assess the feasibility and tolerability of rilmenidine for the treatment of Huntington’s disease

Preclinical data have shown that rilmenidine can regulate autophagy in models of Huntington’s disease (HD), providing a potential route to alter the disease course in patients. Consequently, a 2-year open-label study examining the tolerability and feasibility of rilmenidine in mild-moderate HD was undertaken. 18 non-demented patients with mild to moderate HD took daily doses of 1...

Antioxidants can inhibit basal autophagy and enhance neurodegeneration in models of polyglutamine disease

Many neurodegenerative diseases exhibit protein accumulation and increased oxidative stress. Therapeutic strategies include clearing aggregate-prone proteins by enhancing autophagy or decreasing oxidative stress with antioxidants. Many autophagy-inducing stimuli increase reactive oxygen species (ROS), raising concerns that the benefits of autophagy up-regulation may be...

Contact tracing and population screening for tuberculosis – who should be assessed?

Background The aim of the study was to investigate the relative effectiveness of four strategies in detecting and preventing tuberculosis: contact tracing of smear‐positive pulmonary disease, of smear‐negative pulmonary disease and of non‐pulmonary disease, and screening new entrants. Methods An analysis of patient records and a TB database was carried out for an NHS Trust‐based...

Rapamycin alleviates toxicity of different aggregate-prone proteins

Many neurodegenerative diseases are caused by intracellular, aggregate-prone proteins, including polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin in Huntington's disease (HD) and mutant tau in fronto-temporal dementia/tauopathy. Previously, we showed that rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, enhances mutant huntingtin fragment clearance and attenuated toxicity. Here we show much wider applications...