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Physical activity and the environment: conceptual review and framework for intervention research

Changing the physical environment is one way to promote physical activity and improve health, but evidence on intervention effectiveness is mixed. The theoretical perspectives and conceptual issues discussed or used in evaluative studies and related literature may contribute to these inconsistencies. We aimed to advance the intervention research agenda by systematically searching...

The modelled impact of increases in physical activity: the effect of both increased survival and reduced incidence of disease

for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), which receives funding from UK Clinical Research Collaboration. David Ogilvie and Jenna Panter are supported by the Medical Research Council [Unit Programme ... number MC_UU_12015/6]. Jenna Panter was supported by an NIHR post-doctoral fellowship [PDF-2012-05-157]. Linda Cobiac is supported by an NHMRC Sidney Sax Early Career Research Fellowship (Grant ID: 1036771

Changes in active commuting and changes in physical activity in adults: a cohort study

Background Active travel is associated with greater physical activity, but there is a dearth of research examining this relationship over time. We examined the longitudinal associations between change in time spent in active commuting and changes in recreational and total physical activity. Methods Adult commuters working in Cambridge, United Kingdom completed questionnaires in...

Changes in mode of travel to work: a natural experimental study of new transport infrastructure

). David Ogilvie is supported by the Medical Research Council [Unit Programme number MC_UP_12015/6] and Jenna Panter is supported by an NIHR post-doctoral fellowship. The views and opinions expressed herein ... Panter 0 Roger Mackett 1 David Ogilvie 0 0 MRC Epidemiology Unit and UKCRC Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge , Cambridge Biomedical Campus

Individual Characteristics Associated with Mismatches between Self-Reported and Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity

Background Accurate assessment tools are required for the surveillance of physical activity (PA) levels and the assessment of the effect of interventions. In addition, increasing awareness of PA is often used as the first step in pragmatic behavioural interventions, as discrepancies between the amount of activity an individual perceives they do and the amount actually undertaken...

Development of methods to objectively identify time spent using active and motorised modes of travel to work: how do self-reported measures compare?

Background Active commuting may make an important contribution to population health. Accurate measures of these behaviours are required, but it is unknown how self-reported estimates compare to those derived from objective measures. We sought to develop methods for objectively deriving time spent in specific travel behaviours from a combination of locational and activity data...

Walking and cycling to work despite reporting an unsupportive environment: insights from a mixed-method exploration of counterintuitive findings

Background Perceptions of the environment appear to be associated with walking and cycling. We investigated the reasons for walking and cycling to or from work despite reporting an unsupportive route environment in a sample of commuters. Methods This mixed-method analysis used data collected as part of the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study. 1164 participants completed...

Correlates of Reported and Recorded Time Spent in Physical Activity in Working Adults: Results from the Commuting and Health in Cambridge Study

Background The correlates of physical activity in adults are relatively well studied. However, many studies use self-reported (‘reported’) measures of activity and we know little about the possible differences between the correlates of reported and objective (‘recorded’) measures of physical activity. We compared the correlates of reported and recorded time spent in moderate-to...

Individual, socio-cultural and environmental predictors of uptake and maintenance of active commuting in children: longitudinal results from the SPEEDY study

Background Active commuting is prospectively associated with physical activity in children. Few longitudinal studies have assessed predictors of change in commuting mode. Purpose To investigate the individual, socio-cultural and environmental predictors of uptake and maintenance of active commuting in 10 year-old children. Methods Children were recruited in 2007 and followed-up...

Correlates of time spent walking and cycling to and from work: baseline results from the commuting and health in Cambridge study

Jenna Panter 0 Simon Griffin 0 Andrew Jones Roger Mackett David Ogilvie 0 0 Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Sciences , Cambridge , UK Purpose: Environmental

Commuting and health in Cambridge: a study of a 'natural experiment' in the provision of new transport infrastructure

Background Modifying transport infrastructure to support active travel (walking and cycling) could help to increase population levels of physical activity. However, there is limited evidence for the effects of interventions in this field, and to the best of our knowledge no study has convincingly demonstrated an increase in physical activity directly attributable to this type of...

Physical activity and dietary behaviour in a population-based sample of British 10-year old children: the SPEEDY study (Sport, Physical activity and Eating behaviour: Environmental Determinants in Young people)

Background The SPEEDY study was set up to quantify levels of physical activity (PA) and dietary habits and the association with potential correlates in 9–10 year old British school children. We present here the analyses of the PA, dietary and anthropometry data. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 2064 children (926 boys, 1138 girls) in Norfolk, England, we collected...