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Oral Streptococci Utilize a Siglec-Like Domain of Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins to Preferentially Target Platelet Sialoglycans in Human Blood

Damaged cardiac valves attract blood-borne bacteria, and infective endocarditis is often caused by viridans group streptococci. While such bacteria use multiple adhesins to maintain their normal oral commensal state, recognition of platelet sialoglycans provides an intermediary for binding to damaged valvular endocardium. We use a customized sialoglycan microarray to explore the ...

Role of the Serine-Rich Surface Glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae in the Pathogenesis of Infective Endocarditis

The binding of bacteria to fibrinogen and platelets are important events in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Srr1 is a serine-rich repeat glycoprotein of Streptococcus agalactiae that binds directly to the Aα chain of human fibrinogen. To assess the impact of Srr1 on the pathogenesis of endocarditis due to S. agalactiae, we first examined the binding of this organism to ...

Group B Streptococcal Serine-Rich Repeat Proteins Promote Interaction With Fibrinogen and Vaginal Colonization

Group B streptococcus (GBS) can cause severe disease in susceptible hosts, including newborns, pregnant women, and the elderly. GBS serine-rich repeat (Srr) surface glycoproteins are important adhesins/invasins in multiple host tissues, including the vagina. However, exact molecular mechanisms contributing to their importance in colonization are unknown. We have recently determined ...

Binding of Glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae to Fibrinogen Promotes Attachment to Brain Endothelium and the Development of Meningitis

The serine-rich repeat glycoprotein Srr1 of Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is thought to be an important adhesin for the pathogenesis of meningitis. Although expression of Srr1 is associated with increased binding to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMEC), the molecular basis for this interaction is not well defined. We now demonstrate that Srr1 contributes to GBS ...

Bacteriophage Lysin Mediates the Binding of Streptococcus mitis to Human Platelets through Interaction with Fibrinogen

M. Sullam 0 Michael S. Gilmore, Harvard Medical School, United States of America 0 1 Division of Infectious Diseases, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, San Francisco

The Group B Streptococcal Serine-Rich Repeat 1 Glycoprotein Mediates Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier

BackgroundGroup B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in newborn infants. Because GBS is able to invade, survive, and cross the blood-brain barrier, we sought to identify surface-expressed virulence factors that contribute to blood-brain barrier penetration and the pathogenesis of meningitis MethodsTargeted deletion and insertional mutants were ...

The Pneumococcal Serine-Rich Repeat Protein Is an Intra-Species Bacterial Adhesin That Promotes Bacterial Aggregation In Vivo and in Biofilms

The Pneumococcal serine-rich repeat protein (PsrP) is a pathogenicity island encoded adhesin that has been positively correlated with the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease. Previous studies have shown that PsrP mediates bacterial attachment to Keratin 10 (K10) on the surface of lung cells through amino acids 273–341 located in the Basic Region (BR) ...

A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIbα. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we ...

Rifabutin Therapy for Disseminated Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection

Paul M. Sullam 0 0 Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the University of California , San Francisco, California Although numerous antimicrobial agents have been used to ... . DR. TAPPER. How will azoles be used in this patient popula tion? Should they be avoided? DR. PAUL M. SULLAM. It's hard to say because the use of azoles is so ubiquitous. This question is probably less

Genetic Diversity of Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element in Staphylococcus epidermidis

Mobile Element in Staphylococcus epidermidis Maria Miragaia Herminia de Lencastre Francoise Perdreau-Remington Henry F. Chambers Julie Higashi Paul M. Sullam Jessica Lin Kester I. Wong Katherine A. King

Early Manifestations of Disseminated Mycobacterium avium Complex Disease: A Prospective Evaluation

A nested case-control study was conducted in two trials of prophylaxis for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection to describe the specific signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities of MAC disease in AIDS. Patients had ⩽200/mm3 CD4 cells and a prior AIDS-defining illness. Of 571 patients, 102 (17.9%) developed MAC bacteremia during a mean follow-up of 256 days. Among cases ...

A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study of Rifabutin Added to a Regimen of Clarithromycin and Ethambutol for Treatment of Disseminated Infection with Mycobacterium avium Complex

Current guidelines suggest that disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection be treated with a macrolide plus ethambutol or rifabutin or both. From 1993 to 1996, 198 AIDS patients with MAC bacteremia participated in a prospective, placebo-controlled trial of clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d.) plus ethambutol (1,200 mg/d), with or without rifabutin (300 mg/d). At 16 weeks, ...