Advanced search    

Search: authors:"Petroc Sumner"

6 papers found.
Use AND, OR, NOT, +word, -word, "long phrase", (parentheses) to fine-tune your search.

The reliability paradox: Why robust cognitive tasks do not produce reliable individual differences

Individual differences in cognitive paradigms are increasingly employed to relate cognition to brain structure, chemistry, and function. However, such efforts are often unfruitful, even with the most well established tasks. Here we offer an explanation for failures in the application of robust cognitive paradigms to the study of individual differences. Experimental effects become ...

Exaggerations and Caveats in Press Releases and Health-Related Science News

Background Exaggerated or simplistic news is often blamed for adversely influencing public health. However, recent findings suggested many exaggerations were already present in university press releases, which scientists approve. Surprisingly, these exaggerations were not associated with more news coverage. Here we test whether these two controversial results also arise in press ...

The Relationship between Reversed Masked Priming and the Tri-Phasic Pattern of the Lateralised Readiness Potential

One of the potential explanations for negative compatibility effects (NCE) in subliminal motor priming tasks has been perceptual prime-target interactions. Here, we investigate whether the characteristic tri-phasic LRP pattern associated with the NCE is caused by these prime-target interactions. We found that both the prime-related phase and the critical reversal phase remain ...

Enhanced Awareness Followed Reversible Inhibition of Human Visual Cortex: A Combined TMS, MRS and MEG Study

Interests: The authors confirm that Chris Chambers and Petroc Sumner are PLOS ONE editorial board members, and this does not alter their adherence to PLOS ONE editorial policies and criteria. 1.1 Initial

Language switching and the effects of orthographic specificity and response repetition

In two experiments, Greek-English bilinguals alternated between performing a lexical decision task in Greek and in English. The cost to performance on switch trials interacted with response repetition, implying that a source of this “switch cost” is at the level of response mapping or initiation. Orthographic specificity also affected switch cost. Greek and English have partially ...

Task-set reconfiguration with predictable and unpredictable task switches

Participants switched frequently between high/low and odd/even classification of a digit. The interval between a task cue and the next digit varied between blocks. In Experiment 1, the task switched predictably every two, four, or eight trials. In Experiment 2, switching predictably every four trials was compared with random switching. With predictable switching, the cost was ...