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Breaking Bread: the Functions of Social Eating

Communal eating, whether in feasts or everyday meals with family or friends, is a human universal, yet it has attracted surprisingly little evolutionary attention. I use data from a UK national stratified survey to test the hypothesis that eating with others provides both social and individual benefits. I show that those who eat socially more often feel happier and are more ...

Functional Benefits of (Modest) Alcohol Consumption

evolutionary perspective . In R. I. M. Dunbar , C. Gamble , & J. Gowlett (Eds.), Lucy to language: the benchmark papers (pp. 151 - 180 ). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Roerecke , M. , & Rehm , J. ( 2010

Managing Relationship Decay

road to modern humans: time budgets, fission-fusion sociality, kinship and the division of labour in hominin evolution . In R. I. M. Dunbar , C. Gamble , & J. A. J. Gowlett (Eds.), Lucy to language: The ... ). Contacts and influence . Social Networks , 1 , 5 - 51 . Roberts , S. G. B. ( 2010 ). Constraints on social networks . In R. I. M. Dunbar , C. Gamble , & J. A. J. Gowlett (Eds.), Social brain, distributed

Social cognition on the Internet: testing constraints on social network size

R. I. M. Dunbar * 0 0 Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford , South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD , UK The social brain hypothesis (an explanation for the evolution of brain size

Bridging the bonding gap: the transition from primates to humans

R. I. M. Dunbar * 0 0 British Academy Centenary Research Project, Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford , 64 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PN , UK Primate societies

Processing power limits social group size: computational evidence for the cognitive costs of sociality

T. Dvid-Barrett 0 R. I. M. Dunbar 0 0 Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford , South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD, UK Articles on similar topics can be found in the following

Altruism in networks: the effect of connections

Oliver Curry R. I. M. Dunbar Subject collections Articles on similar topics can be found in the following collections Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article - sign up in the ... effect of connections Oliver Curry* and R. I. M. Dunbar Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford, 64 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PN, UK *Author for correspondence (). Why

Orbital prefrontal cortex volume predicts social network size: an imaging study of individual differences in humans

The social brain hypothesis, an explanation for the unusually large brains of primates, posits that the size of social group typical of a species is directly related to the volume of its neocortex. To test whether this hypothesis also applies at the within-species level, we applied the Cavalieri method of stereology in conjunction with point counting on magnetic resonance images to ...

Social laughter is correlated with an elevated pain threshold

the six experiments, and overall, does not differ from a normal distribution (Fishers Downloaded from http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/ on November 14, 2014 Laughter and pain R. I. M. Dunbar et al ... thresholds both in the laboratory and under naturalistic Downloaded from http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/ on November 14, 2014 Laughter and pain R. I. M. Dunbar et al. 1165 conditions. In both cases

Rowers' high: behavioural synchrony is correlated with elevated pain thresholds

Emma E. A. Cohen Robin Ejsmond-Frey Nicola Knight R. I. M. Dunbar Articles on similar topics can be found in the following collections Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article

Ecological and social determinants of birth intervals in baboons

Birth rates in primates have long been proposed to result from an interaction between ecological and social factors. We analyzed a variety of social and environmental variables to determine which ones best explain the observed variation in interbirth intervals across 14 baboon populations. Both the number of females in the group and mean annual temperature were found to be ...