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Microsatellite marker development from next-generation sequencing in the New England cottontail (Sylvilagus transitionalis) and cross-amplification in the eastern cottontail (S. floridanus)

Objective The New England cottontail (Sylvilagus transitionalis) is a species of high conservation priority in the Northeastern United States, and was a candidate for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act until a recent decision determined that conservation actions were sufficient to preclude listing. The aim of this study was to develop a suite of microsatellite loci...

Conservation status of the American horseshoe crab, (Limulus polyphemus): a regional assessment

dedicated to the memory of Timothy L. King (1958-2016), our friend and colleague whose research provided the foundation for understanding and guiding the conservation of many threatened and endangered species

Metagenomic analysis of planktonic microbial consortia from a non-tidal urban-impacted segment of James River

. Franklin 0 Maria C. Rivera 0 Francine M. Cabral Hugh L. Eaves Vicki Gardiakos Kevin P. Keegan Timothy L. King 0 Department of Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University , 1000 W Cary Street, Richmond, VA

Probabilistic-based genetic assignment model: assignments to subcontinent of origin of the West Greenland Atlantic salmon harvest

Sheehan, T. F., Legault, C. M., King, T. L., and Spidle, A. P. 2010. Probabilistic-based genetic assignment model: assignments to subcontinent of origin of the West Greenland Atlantic salmon harvest. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 67: 537–550. A multistock Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fishery operates off the coast of West Greenland and harvests fish of North American and...

Tracing the first steps of American sturgeon pioneers in Europe

Background A Baltic population of Atlantic sturgeon was founded ~1,200 years ago by migrants from North America, but after centuries of persistence, the population was extirpated in the 1960s, mainly as a result of over-harvest and habitat alterations. As there are four genetically distinct groups of Atlantic sturgeon inhabiting North American rivers today, we investigated the...