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Dissociating the capture of attention from saccade activation by subliminal abrupt onsets

Attentional capture and effects on saccade metrics by subliminal abrupt onset cues have been studied with peripheral cues at one out of several (two to four) display locations, swiftly followed by additional onsets at the other display locations. The lead time of the cue was too short to be seen. Here, we were interested in whether such subliminal onset cues influenced saccades ...

Stimulus-driven attentional capture by subliminal onset cues

In two experiments, we tested whether subliminal abrupt onset cues capture attention in a stimulus-driven way. An onset cue was presented 16 ms prior to the stimulus display that consisted of clearly visible color targets. The onset cue was presented either at the same side as the target (the valid cue condition) or on the opposite side of the target (the invalid cue condition). ...

Effects of relevant and irrelevant color singletons on inhibition of return and attentional capture

We tested whether color singletons lead to saccadic and manual inhibition of return (IOR; i.e., slower responses at cued locations) and whether IOR depended on the relevance of the color singletons. The target display was preceded by a nonpredictive cue display. In three experiments, half of the cues were response-relevant, because participants had to perform a discrimination task ...

Automatic priming of attentional control by relevant colors

Ulrich Ansorge 0 Stefanie I. Becker 0 0 U. Ansorge Institute for Cognitive Science, Universitt Osnabrck , Osnabrck, Germany 1 ) Fakultt fr Psychologie, Universitt Wien , Liebiggasse 5, 1010 Wien

Spatial mislocalization as a consequence of sequential coding of stimuli

In three experiments, we tested whether sequentially coding two visual stimuli can create a spatial misperception of a visual moving stimulus. In Experiment 1, we showed that a spatial misperception, the flash-lag effect, is accompanied by a similar temporal misperception of first perceiving the flash and only then a change of the moving stimulus, when in fact the two events were ...

Masked singleton effects

In the present study, we tested whether visual singletons remaining outside awareness are processed. Singletons differ by at least one feature from their more homogeneous neighbors. Here, we used backward masking to prevent awareness of shape singleton primes (Experiments 1–4) or color singleton primes (Experiment 5). Masked singleton primes nonetheless produced a congruence ...

A Simon effect in memory retrieval: Evidence for the response-discrimination account

PETER WHR Friedrich-Alexander Universitt Erlangen Germany ULRICH ANSORGE Universitt Bielefeld Bielefeld Germany According to the traditional view, the effects of irrelevant stimulus location on the

Goal-driven attentional capture by invisible colors: Evidence from event-related potentials

We combined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures to test whether subliminal visual stimuli can capture attention in a goal-dependent manner. Participants searched for visual targets defined by a specific color. Search displays served as metacontrast masks for preceding cue displays that contained one cue in the target color. Although this target-color cue ...

Saccades reveal that allocentric coding of the moving object causes mislocalization in the flash-lag effect

The flash-lag effect is a visual misperception of a position of a flash relative to that of a moving object: Even when both are at the same position, the flash is reported to lag behind the moving object. In the present study, the flash-lag effect was investigated with eye-movement measurements: Subjects were required to saccade to either the flash or the moving object. The results ...

The initial stage of visual selection is controlled by top-down task set: new ERP evidence

Supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Grant An 353/2-1 to Ulrich Ansorge and by a BBSRC grant (UK) to Martin Eimer. The authors thank John McDonald, Jan Theeuwes, and Chip Folk for their comments ... . Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Ulrich Ansorge, Fakultt fr Psychologie, Universitt Wien, Liebiggasse 5, A-1010 Vienna, Austria. E-mail: .

More efficient rejection of happy than of angry face distractors in visual search

In the present study, we examined whether the detection advantage for negative-face targets in crowds of positive-face distractors over positive-face targets in crowds of negative faces can be explained by differentially efficient distractor rejection. Search Condition A demonstrated more efficient distractor rejection with negative-face targets in positive-face crowds than vice ...