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Social reference managers and their users: A survey of demographics and ideologies

Larivière, Cassidy R. Sugimoto. Data curation: Pei-Ying Chen. Formal analysis: Pei-Ying Chen. Funding acquisition: Vincent Larivière, Cassidy R. Sugimoto. Investigation: Pei-Ying Chen, Vincent Larivière ... , Cassidy R. Sugimoto. Methodology: Pei-Ying Chen, Erica Hayes, Vincent Larivière, Cassidy R. Sugimoto. Project administration: Cassidy R. Sugimoto. Supervision: Cassidy R. Sugimoto. Writing ± original

The rise of the middle author: Investigating collaboration and division of labor in biomedical research using partial alphabetical authorship

. (PDF) Author Contributions Conceptualization: Philippe Mongeon, Elise Smith. Data curation: Philippe Mongeon. Formal analysis: Philippe Mongeon. Funding acquisition: Vincent Larivière. Investigation ... : Philippe Mongeon. Methodology: Philippe Mongeon. Project administration: Vincent Larivière. Software: Bruno Joyal. Supervision: Vincent Larivière. Visualization: Philippe Mongeon. Writing ± original

How Many Is Too Many? On the Relationship between Research Productivity and Impact

Over the last few decades, the institutionalisation of quantitative research evaluations has created incentives for scholars to publish as many papers as possible. This paper assesses the effects of such incentives on individual researchers’ scientific impact, by analysing the relationship between their number of articles and their proportion of highly cited papers. In other...

Beyond funding: Acknowledgement patterns in biomedical, natural and social sciences

between funding, productivity, and the impact of publications (e.g., [2±6]). Doctoral Scholarships. Nadine Desrochers and Vincent Larivière acknowledge the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of ... -Faes, Nadine Desrochers, Rodrigo Costas, Vincent Larivière. Data curation: Maxime Sainte-Marie. Formal analysis: Adèle Paul-Hus, AdriaÂn A. DÂõaz-Faes, Rodrigo Costas, Vincent Larivière. 11 / 14

Researchers’ Individual Publication Rate Has Not Increased in a Century

Debates over the pros and cons of a “publish or perish” philosophy have inflamed academia for at least half a century. Growing concerns, in particular, are expressed for policies that reward “quantity” at the expense of “quality,” because these might prompt scientists to unduly multiply their publications by fractioning (“salami slicing”), duplicating, rushing, simplifying, or...

On the Compliance of Women Engineers with a Gendered Scientific System

There has been considerable effort in the last decade to increase the participation of women in engineering through various policies. However, there has been little empirical research on gender disparities in engineering which help underpin the effective preparation, co-ordination, and implementation of the science and technology (S&T) policies. This article aims to present a...

Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity

The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources...

The Oligopoly of Academic Publishers in the Digital Era

The consolidation of the scientific publishing industry has been the topic of much debate within and outside the scientific community, especially in relation to major publishers’ high profit margins. However, the share of scientific output published in the journals of these major publishers, as well as its evolution over time and across various disciplines, has not yet been...

Long-Distance Interdisciplinarity Leads to Higher Scientific Impact

Scholarly collaborations across disparate scientific disciplines are challenging. Collaborators are likely to have their offices in another building, attend different conferences, and publish in other venues; they might speak a different scientific language and value an alien scientific culture. This paper presents a detailed analysis of success and failure of interdisciplinary...

Relationships between Interlibrary Loan and Research Activity in Canada

Interlibrary Loan borrowing rates in academic libraries are influenced by an array of factors. This article explores the relationship between interlibrary loan borrowing activity and research activity at 42 Canadian academic institutions. A significant positive correlation was found between interlibrary loan borrowing activity and measures of research activity. The degree of...

Characterizing Social Media Metrics of Scholarly Papers: The Effect of Document Properties and Collaboration Patterns

A number of new metrics based on social media platforms—grouped under the term “altmetrics”—have recently been introduced as potential indicators of research impact. Despite their current popularity, there is a lack of information regarding the determinants of these metrics. Using publication and citation data from 1.3 million papers published in 2012 and covered in Thomson...

Stability and Longevity in the Publication Careers of U.S. Doctorate Recipients

Since the 1950s, the number of doctorate recipients has risen dramatically in the United States. In this paper, we investigate whether the longevity of doctorate recipients’ publication careers has changed. This is achieved by matching 1951–2010 doctorate recipients with rare names in astrophysics, chemistry, economics, genetics and psychology in the dissertation database...

The Academic Advantage: Gender Disparities in Patenting

We analyzed gender disparities in patenting by country, technological area, and type of assignee using the 4.6 million utility patents issued between 1976 and 2013 by the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO). Our analyses of fractionalized inventorships demonstrate that women’s rate of patenting has increased from 2.7% of total patenting activity to 10.8% over the nearly...

Do Altmetrics Work? Twitter and Ten Other Social Web Services

Altmetric measurements derived from the social web are increasingly advocated and used as early indicators of article impact and usefulness. Nevertheless, there is a lack of systematic scientific evidence that altmetrics are valid proxies of either impact or utility although a few case studies have reported medium correlations between specific altmetrics and citation rates for...

A Small World of Citations? The Influence of Collaboration Networks on Citation Practices

This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10...

Scientists Popularizing Science: Characteristics and Impact of TED Talk Presenters

The TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) conference and associated website of recorded conference presentations (TED Talks) is a highly successful disseminator of science-related videos, claiming over a billion online views. Although hundreds of scientists have presented at TED, little information is available regarding the presenters, their academic credentials, and the...

Design and Update of a Classification System: The UCSD Map of Science

Global maps of science can be used as a reference system to chart career trajectories, the location of emerging research frontiers, or the expertise profiles of institutes or nations. This paper details data preparation, analysis, and layout performed when designing and subsequently updating the UCSD map of science and classification system. The original classification and map...

The Effects of Aging on Researchers' Publication and Citation Patterns

The average age at which U.S. researchers receive their first grant from NIH has increased from 34.3 in 1970, to 41.7 in 2004. These data raise the crucial question of the effects of aging on the scientific productivity and impact of researchers. Drawing on a sizeable sample of 6,388 university professors in Quebec who have published at least one paper between 2000 and 2007, our...

Self-Selected or Mandated, Open Access Increases Citation Impact for Higher Quality Research

Background Articles whose authors have supplemented subscription-based access to the publisher's version by self-archiving their own final draft to make it accessible free for all on the web (“Open Access”, OA) are cited significantly more than articles in the same journal and year that have not been made OA. Some have suggested that this “OA Advantage” may not be causal but just...