Washington University Jurisprudence Review

http://openscholarship.wustl.edu/law_jurisprudence

List of Papers (Total 137)

Ethnic Studies as Antisubordination Education: A Critical Race Theory Approach to Employment Discrimination Remedies

This Note will use a critical race theory lens to argue that most trainings on equal employment opportunity (“EEO”), diversity, or implicit bias operate as a restrictive remedy to Title VII race discrimination violations, and that incorporating an ethnic studies framework into these trainings can further an expansive view of antidiscrimination law. A restrictive view of...

Political Speech in the Armed Forces: Shouting Fire in a Crowded Cyberspace

A staple of the American version of democracy is civilian control of the military: we are uncomfortable with politicization of the Armed Forces, and military and other federal laws restrict the political expression of servicemembers (“SMs”) in the Armed Forces, whether they are active- duty members or National Guard or Reserves serving on active duty. These restrictions, while...

A Clash of Principles: Personal Jurisdiction and Two-Level Utilitarianism in the Information Age

Utilitarianism provides the best analytic framework for “minimum contacts” analyses in multi-state mass tort litigation. Utilitarianism is a consequentialist ethical philosophy contending that one should act in a way that maximizes utility; that is, act in a way that maximizes pleasure and minimizes pain. This is often referred to as the “felicific calculus.”1 To maintain a civil...

Reconciling the Rule of Law: Rights and Punishment

There is an intractable paradox in the relation between rights and criminal punishment. Criminal punishment frequently conflicts with rights; people typically have identical rights within a legal system, yet the punished are unable to exercise the rights to the same extent as other people. But criminal punishment, in conjunction with criminal laws, also operates to protect rights...

Against Life Without Parole

We have many good reasons to abolish life without parole sentences (LWOP, known in some countries as whole life sentences) and no good reasons not to. After reviewing the current state of LWOP sentences in the United States, I argue that the only rationale for punishment that can hope to justify them is retributivism. But even if retributivism is a sound principle, it in no way...

Judging Well

Can judges interpret the law in a manner that is objectively verifiable, or do judges necessarily – even if unconsciously – inject their own predispositions and biases into their decisions? It is difficult to decide whether such a question is frivolous in the post-Realist age, or whether it is the is the single most important question that we can ask about our legal system. I...

High Priorities: Land Use, Marijuana, and Meta-Values

This Note will examine the motivations surrounding the adoption of zoning ordinances pertaining to the production and sale of marijuana through the lens of John Dewey’s theory of valuation. Applying Dewey’s theory to the zoning ordinances of a sampling of state and local governments, I will argue first that the choice of land uses to be regulated and restricted through local...

Dworkin's Incomplete Interpretation of Democracy

This essay mounts an immanent critique of Dworkin’s defense of judicial review. Taking Dworkin’s methodology of constructive interpretation as my starting point, I argue that when analyzing the role that political institutions play in democracy, Dworkin fails to take his own method far enough. In particular, he limits his constructive interpretation of democracy to the practice...

Freedom and Affordances of the Net

This Article is about the relationship between technology and society in fundamental rights theory. So far, the discussion about law and technology has generally been one-directional within the most relevant branches of the social sciences; scholars of the law have been treating technology as a black box when conducting their analyses or developing their theories. In turn...

"Strike Two, You're Out!" The Need for a More Stringent Drug Policy in Major League Baseball

This Note argues that MLB should adopt a more stringent drug policy than the one currently set forth in MLB’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program for two reasons. First, the increasing prevalence of PED use among MLB players threatens baseball’s integrity. Second, professional players’ PED use may encourage aspiring young athletes to abuse PEDs, which may harm their long...

Internationalizing and Historicizing Hart’s Theory of Law

In The Concept of Law – which continues to enjoy the central position in the field of analytical jurisprudence five decades after its initial publication – H.L.A. Hart makes two powerful claims. He argues that his theory of law is universal (in that it can apply to any legal culture) and timeless (in that it can apply to different times in history). Despite the sweeping, bold...

A Just War Inquiry of Police, Prosecutors and Deadly Force

Law enforcement is authorized to use deadly force under limited circumstances in the United States. Most do not dispute that there are some clear cases when the use of deadly force is warranted. The more controversial issues arise when attempting to articulate limits on when lethal force is justified. While theorists and academics can contemplate how police officers should act in...

Wittgenstein’s Poker: Contested Constitutionalism and the Limits of Public Meaning Originalism

Constitutional originalism is much in the news as our new President fills the Supreme Court vacancy Antonin Scalia’s death has created. “Public meaning” originalism is probably the most influential version of originalism in current theoretical circles. This essay argues that, while these “New Originalists” have thoughtfully escaped some of the debilitating criticisms leveled...

Confucian Jurisprudence, Dworkin, and Hard Cases

This Article argues that Confucian jurisprudence can accurately be analogized to Dworkin’s adjudicative theory of law, in particular, his interpretive theory of law. To more effectively reveal the methods of Confucian jurisprudence and therefore carry out a comparison with Dworkin’s interpretive theory of law, this article adopts Dworkin’s methodology of focusing on “hard cases...

Justice Antonin Scalia’s Flawed Originalist Justification for Brown v. Board of Education

This article examines Justice Antonin Scalia and Bryan Garner’s originalist justification of Brown v. Board of Education in Reading Law, concluding that their analysis is flawed in at least three respects: (1) their interpretation that the texts of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments prohibited all white-supremacist and separationist laws is atextual, acontextual, and...

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