Animal Studies Journal

http://ro.uow.edu.au/asj/

List of Papers (Total 163)

[Review] Michael Lundblad, editor, Animalities: Literary and Cultural Studies Beyond the Human. Edinburgh University Press, 2017. 249pp

Lundblad’s introduction defines and separates human-animal studies, animality studies and posthumanism. While there are perhaps more cross-overs than Lundblad suggests, the introduction provides a lucid discussion of these fields, sub-fields and their provenance. In addition, each essay in Animalities locates its analysis in relation to these categorizations. Cary Wolfe’s essay...

[Review] Lesley A. Sharp, Animal Ethos: The Morality of Human-Animal Encounters in Experimental Lab Science. University of California Press, 2018. 312pp

Animal Ethos. What is that? This heading on its own is a puzzle. Taken together with the subheading and reading the book it seems that ‘Animal Ethos’ means the customary way of interacting with animals in lab settings. The sub-heading led me to believe that the book would be not just about the ethos in the sense just described but about what is right and what is wrong in the...

[Review] James Hevia, Animal Labor and Colonial Warfare. Chicago University Press, 2018. 328pp

James Hevia’s very accomplished history, Animal Labor and Colonial Warfare, actually contains more than one history. A history of the military’s reliance on nonhuman animal (animal) labour emerges from a history of the administrative procedures of a British colonial regime. Some years ago, I went searching for this type of animal history to contextualize colonial war re...

‘Let’s Find Out! What Do I Make?’ [Review] Kathryn Gillespie, The Cow with Ear Tag #1389. University of Chicago Press, 2018. 272pp

I’m halfway through Kathryn Gillespie’s book when it hits me. This enormous shadow lake of sadness I’ve been walking around with – it’s dairy. It’s the electric prods that move cows through pens. It’s the endless stream of bovine bodies flowing around the world. It’s the ginormous global wet market of milk and semen. It’s the aftermath of shotgun blasts delivered to immobile cows...

‘Animals Are Their Best Advocates’: Interspecies Relations, Embodied Actions, and Entangled Activism

Since 1986, the Coalition Against Duck Shooting (CADS) has sought to ban the practice of recreational duck hunting across Australia. Campaigners have developed techniques to disrupt shooters, rescue injured water birds, and gain media coverage. The campaign is underpinned by embodied processes that engage empathy, emotion, affect, and cognition. Seeking to understand human-animal...

First Dog, Last Dog: New Intertextual Short Fictions about Canis lupus familiaris

The double short story sequence ‘First Dog, Last Dog’ explores interdependencies between domesticated animals and humans. The first story, ‘The Death of the First Dog’, re-reads and quotes from Homer’s The Odyssey and the encounter between Odysseus and his aged hunting dog Argos. Its companion piece, ‘The Carrying’, is set in a speculative future. Exploiting qualities of the...

Remembering the Huia: Extinction and Nostalgia in a Bird World

This paper examines the role of nostalgia in practices of remembering the Huia, an extinct bird endemic to Aotearoa New Zealand. It suggests that nostalgia for the Huia specifically, and New Zealand's indigenous birds more generally, has occurred as both restorative nostalgia and reflective nostalgia. It argues that the former problematically looks to recreate a past world in...

Animal Studies Journal 2019 8 (1): Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Notes on Contributors

Animal Studies Journal 2019 8 (1): Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Notes on Contributors.

[Review] Strange Mirrors: Review of Tessa Laird, Bat, Reaktion, 2018. 224pp.

In the latest text in Reaktion Books’ Animal Series, art critic and theorist Tessa Laird’s Bat provides a cultural history of the species, including a sociological critique of the place of bats in human history. Seeking to correct what she perceives to be inaccurate, yet unrelentingly persistent representations of these animals, Laird covers everything from bat biology, to the...

[Review] Anna Barcz. Animal Narratives and Culture: Vulnerable Realism. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017. xii,185pp.

Anna Barcz’s Animal Narratives and Culture: Vulnerable Realism sets out to answer two related questions: what do animals add when they are realistically included in cultural texts, and what is the role of fiction in particular? As part of the examination of these questions, the book identifies what Barcz terms ‘zoonarratives’ and develops the concept of zoocriticism itself. Barcz...

[Review] DeVries, Scott M. Creature Discomfort: Fauna-criticism, Ethics and the Representation of Animals in Spanish American Fiction and Poetry. Leiden: Brill, 2016. Critical Animal Studies, 4. 328pp.

Scott M. DeVries’ exhaustive overview of Spanish American Literature serves as a substantial introduction to Spanish American literature in relation to Critical Animal Studies and what DeVries terms Traditional Animal Studies. Motivated by the lack of Spanish American literature featuring in animal studies, his survey convinces of the richness of this literature. The neologism...

An Auto-ethnography of Anti-dairy Vegan Activism in New Zealand

This paper examines my experiences of anti-dairy activism in New Zealand. Using autoethnographic methodology, I discuss the emotional work and core strategies and tactics of Starfish Bobby Calf Project (hereafter called Starfish). Starfish is a grassroots vegan activist group that I founded in 2013. Its genesis began in my childhood, when I became aware of the plight of bobby...

From Rice Eaters to Soy Boys: Race, Gender, and Tropes of ‘Plant Food Masculinity’

Tropes of ‘effeminized’ masculinity have long been bound up with a plant-based diet, dating back to the ‘effeminate rice eater’ stereotype used to justify 19th-century colonialism in Asia to the altright’s use of the term ‘soy boy’ on Twitter and other social media today to call out men they perceive to be weak, effeminate, and politically correct (Gambert and Linné). This...

bloodlines – Mammalian Motherhood, Biotechnologies and other Entanglements

This paper outlines my current sculptural research project bloodlines focusing on the ways in which dairy cows are entangled with multiple biotechnologies and the wider environment. bloodlines brings extant works such as fleshlumps, boobscape and slink, together with new works, to represent the dairy industry, the environmental impacts of animal agriculture and the biotech...

The Dairy Issue: ‘Practicing the Art of War’

In this paper I offer several stories to respond to philosopher Vinciane Despret and sociologist Jocelyne Porcher’s considerations on ‘dairy’ cows and work. The stories include the cows in the herd that I have lived alongside for almost 30 years, a kind of auto-ethnographic approach; and stories and a few facts about the dairy industry in Australia. These accounts are informed by...

Provocations from the field: Female Reproductive Exploitation Comes Home

Sexual violation and reproductive exploitation happen to vulnerable bodies. After studying systems of female reproductive servitude and visiting ‘parlors’, exhibitions, and auctions where females are sold into captivity, Dr. Kathryn Gillespie of the University of Washington found relentless ‘sexually violent commodification of the female body’. Meet Carly (not her real name...

Animal Studies Journal 2018 7 (2): Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Notes on Contributors

Animal Studies Journal 2018 7 (1): Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Notes on Contributors

From Disability to Eco-ability [Review] Anthony J. Nocella II, Amber E. George, and J. L. Schatz, editors. The Intersectionality of Critical Animal, Disability, and Environmental Studies: Toward Eco-ability, Justice, and Liberation

The Intersectionality of Critical Animal, Disability, and Environmental Studies: Toward Eco-ability, Justice, and Liberation (hereafter, Intersectionality), edited by critical scholars Anthony Nocella II, Amber E. George, and J.L. Schatz, is the follow-up collection to an earlier anthology edited by Nocella II, Judy Bentley and Janet Duncan. Published in 2012, Earth, Animal, and...