A Pharmacological Model of TRPA1-Mediated Nociception in Zebrafish for Therapeutic Discovery

The Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research, Aug 2019

By Emre Coskun, Published on 08/15/19

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A Pharmacological Model of TRPA1-Mediated Nociception in Zebrafish for Therapeutic Discovery

E. (2019). A pharmacological model of TRPA1 -mediated nociception in zebrafish for therapeutic discovery. Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research 0 A Pharmacological Model of TRPA1-Mediated Nociception in Zebrafish for Therapeutic Discovery 1 Student researcher: Emre Coskun , Junior Chronic pain exists in over 50 million American adults, and it can have significant effects on an individual's quality of life. Chronic pain is often inadequately treated with narcotic painkillers such as opioids. The long-term usage of opioids leads to side effects like overdose, tolerance, and dependence, which decreases the number of effective treatments available for chronic pain. A better treatment alternative would be non-narcotic analgesics that target the local transmission of pain (nociception). - Nociception arising from exogenous (environmental) and endogenous (internal) irritants is mediated by the activation of the Transient Receptor Potential, subfamily A1 (TRPA1) channel through calcium influx in sensory A photo of the author in the Leung Lab zebrafish facility at Purdue University. neurons. Although the TRPA1 channel is an analgesic target for chronic pain, there are no inhibitors for it that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The TRPA1 channel is present in both humans and zebrafish. In zebrafish, this channel can be activated by chemical irritants (agonists), which would result in an increase in swimming behavior (hyperlocomotion). I hypothesized that this hyperlocomotion can be used to screen novel antinociceptive drugs. Research advisors Yuk Fai Leung and Logan Ganzen write: ?Emre joined this project because of a Collaborative Research Grant from the Purdue Institute for Integrative Neuroscience. His work has contributed to our understanding of how TRPA1 modulates neuropathic pain and has resulted in the development of a zebrafish behavioral assay that can be used to identify novel nonopiate painkillers.?


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Emre Coskun. A Pharmacological Model of TRPA1-Mediated Nociception in Zebrafish for Therapeutic Discovery, The Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research, 2019,