40-Gb/s all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder employing cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers

Science Bulletin, Apr 2012

High-speed all-optical logic circuits have attracted much attention because of their important roles in signal processing in next-generation optical networks. The digital encoder is widely used in binary calculation, multiplexing, demultiplexing, address recognition and data encryption. A priority encoder allows the existence of multiple valid inputs simultaneously, identifies the priority of the request signals and encodes the priority. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an all-optical 4-bit priority encoder for return-to-zero signals at 40 Gbit/s based on cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers. Detuning filters after semiconductor optical amplifiers are employed to improve the output performance. Correct logic bit sequences and clear open eye patterns with extinction ratios exceeding 10 dB are achieved.

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40-Gb/s all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder employing cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers

LEI Lei 0 DONG JianJi 0 ZHANG Yin 0 YU Yu 0 ZHANG XinLiang 0 0 Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and the School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology , Wuhan 430074, China High-speed all-optical logic circuits have attracted much attention because of their important roles in signal processing in next-generation optical networks. The digital encoder is widely used in binary calculation, multiplexing, demultiplexing, address recognition and data encryption. A priority encoder allows the existence of multiple valid inputs simultaneously, identifies the priority of the request signals and encodes the priority. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an all-optical 4-bit priority encoder for return-to-zero signals at 40 Gbit/s based on cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers. Detuning filters after semiconductor optical amplifiers are employed to improve the output performance. Correct logic bit sequences and clear open eye patterns with extinction ratios exceeding 10 dB are achieved. - High-speed all-optical logic circuits will be widely used in next-generation optical networks because of their important roles in signal processing such as address recognition, data encryption and label swapping. Recently, various basic logic gates have been demonstrated with different nonlinear devices [13]. Meanwhile, many more complex all-optical logic circuits have also been reported. For combinational logic functions, a 10-Gb/s all-optical half-adder with interferometric semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) gates has been demonstrated [4], a simultaneous optical digital halfsubtractor and adder using SOAs combined with a waveguide made from periodically poled lithium niobate has been proposed [5], an all-optical encoder and comparator were realized simultaneously for two-input return-to-zero (RZ) signals at 40 Gbit/s on the basis of cross-gain modulation (XGM) and four-wave mixing (FWM) in three parallel SOAs [6], and a 2-to-4 level decoder was used to develop an all-optical two-input digital multiplexer based on cross polarization modulation in an SOA [7]. Sequential logic circuits, such as an N-bit shift register [8] and binary counter [9], were designed and demonstrated exploiting ring buffers. On the other hand, logic minterms were reported [10,11] for three-input demodulated differential phase-shift keying signals employing SOAs and delay interferometers (DIs) at 20 and 40 Gbit/s respectively, which can be considered a basic building block for arbitrary logic functions. However, to our best knowledge, a module that performs digital priority encoding in the optical domain has not yet been demonstrated. It is known that a traditional digital binary encoder enables only one effective input at any one time. If more than one input is present at the same time, the circuit will miscode. However, in a practical situation, different inputs require responses simultaneously; e.g., the interrupt request in computer systems. A priority encoder allows the existence of multiple valid inputs simultaneously, identifies the priority of the request signals and encodes the priority. In this paper, we demonstrate an all-optical 4-bit priority encoder operating at 40 Gbit/s based on XGM in SOAs. Detuning filters were employed after SOAs to improve dy The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com namic characteristics. The proposed scheme has the advantages of power efficiency, high operation speed and integration potential. Principle of operation The logic truth table for an all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder is shown in Table 1. I3, I2, I1 and I0 are four line inputs, and the logic state 1 indicates that a response is required while the logic state 0 indicates that it is not. is an arbitrary item that could be 1 or 0. Y1 and Y0 are the final outputs encoded according to the priority of the signals requiring a response. With regard to a stable system, the output is 0 if there is no input. Therefore, Y1Y0 is 00 if I3I2I1I0 = 0000. However, this conflicts with the output encoding when I3I2I1I0 = 0001. Thus, GS is set to identify whether there are inputs, and it gives the system a warning output, logic state 1, if the input is 0000. In this circumstance, although the output code is 00, it is invalid. From the truth table, we also recognize that the priority order of the inputs from high to low is I3, I2, I1, I0. Therefore, if I3 and I2 are both 1, only I3 is encoded. According to Table 1, the output expressions of the priority encoder are written as From eq. (1), we see that the priority encoder is mainly made up of logic OR and AND functions. However, the OR logic contained in Y1 and Y0 cannot be obtained by coupling the items on the right of the expressions directly because there might be an identical bit 1 in different inputs that will induce multilevel intensities in the outputs Y1 and Y0. Apart from this, at least two SOAs are required to achieve Y0. One is used to obtain I2 I1 and the other is used to obtain I3 I2 I1 . GS is also difficult to obtain using an AND gate because there are too many inputs. To avoid multilevel intensities, reduce the number of SOAs and avoid using AND Table 1 Logic truth table for an all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder logic for multiple inputs, the expressions are modified as As shown in eq. (2), Y1 and Y0 are never multilevel because of the simultaneous existence of I3 and I3 , which cannot be 1 at the same time. Thus, Y1 and Y0 are easily realized by coupling the items on the right of the expressions directly. I3 I2 I1 (in Y0) and GS are modified to (I3 I2 )I1 and I3 I2 I1 I0 respectively because the realization of the NOR gate in the SOA is much easier than that of the AND gate. The system configuration is illustrated in Figure 1. Regarding Y1, the intensity of the probe light I2 is modulated by the intensity of the pump light I3 according to the XGM effect in the SOA. When I3 is strong (high level), carriers in SOA1 are heavily consumed and SOA1 becomes saturated. Thus, I2 cannot be amplified and the output is 0. On the contrary, when I3 is weak (low level), almost no carriers in SOA1 are consumed and I2 is amplified. Therefore, the logic operation I3 I2 is easily obtained at the output of SOA1 when the average power of I3 is much greater than that of I2. Y1 can then be achieved by coupling I3 I2 and I3 directly. As for Y0, both I3 and I2 act as pump lights with nearly the same power, and I1 serves as the probe light. With a similar operation principle, SOA2 becomes saturated as long as either I3 or I2 is high, and I1 is suppressed accordingly. Only when both I3 and I2 are low is I1 amplified. Hence, we obtain (I3 I2 )I1 , and Y0 is demonstrated by combining (I3 I2 )I1 and I3. While the pump lights I3, I2, I1 and I0 are co-propagated with another continuous-wave (cw) probe Figure 1 System configuration. light, the logic NOR gate for multiple inputs can be realized and the warning output GS is achieved. Experimental setup and results The experimental setup for the all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder is depicted in Figure 2. The cw beams generated by LD1, LD2, LD3, LD4 and LD5 have wavelengths of 1560.75 (I3), 1557.69 (I2), 1554.45 (I1), 1551.24 (I0) and 1547.72 nm (cw), respectively. The data signals at wavelengths from I3 to I0 are modulated simultaneously by two MachZehnder modulators (MZMs) to produce RZ signals at 40 Gbit/s with a duty cycle of 33%. The fixed data stream 1001 0011 0101 0010 is provided by the bit pattern generator (BPG). An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is exploited to amplify the signals to 15.63 dBm. The four data signals are then separated by a wavelength- division demultiplexer (WDM) with channel spacing of 1.6 nm. The signals at I2, I1 and I0 are delayed with different bit time durations by optical delay lines (ODLs) to emulate four different data signals I3, I2, I1 and I0. The corresponding absolute data sequences are 1001 0011 0101 0010, 0101 0010 0110 1010, 0100 1010 0100 1101 and 1010 1001 0100 1001. Their temporal waveforms and eye diagrams are recorded by the communication signal analyzer (CSA). The eye diagrams are measured for 271 pseudo-random binary sequence input. I3 is divided between two paths, one to combine with the SOA1 (CIP ultrafast SOA) output, and the other as one input of SOA1; the average powers are 6.12 and 10.35 dBm, respectively. I2 is attenuated to 8.96 dBm as the probe light. SOA1 is biased at 250 mA with a recovery time of about 50 ps. The 3-dB bandwidth of the bandpass filter (TBPF) after SOA1 is 1 nm, which ensures the pulse width of the output Figure 2 Experimental setup for the 4-bit all-optical digital priority encoder. I3 I2 is not too wide. The TBPF central wavelength is detuned with a slight blue shift from I2 to improve the quality of the final logic signal and increase the operation speed. Y1 is then achieved by coupling I3 I2 and I3 directly. Similarly, as for (I3 I2 )I1 , the average power of the SOA2 inputs, I3, I2 and I1, are adjusted to 6.60, 6.45 and 8.47 dBm, respectively. Y0 is demonstrated by combining (I3 I2 )I1 and I3, and the TBPF is a little blue shifted from the signal light at I1. The cw light generated by LD5 serves as the probe light of SOA3 with power of 7.72 dBm. The pump light is composed of I3, I2, I1 and I0, whose average powers are 5.27, 7.54, 10.12 and 8.99 dBm, respectively. The cw light is filtered out by the TBPF at the output port of SOA3, which provides the warning signal GS. The temporal waveforms and eye diagrams are illustrated in Figure 3. Figures 3(a)(d) show the original input data of the input signals. The zero levels of I3 I2 and (I3 I2 )I1 , as shown in Figure 3(e) and (f) respectively, are not so flat because the gain of the probe light is not compressed completely. The final output items Y1 and Y0 are depicted in Figure 3(g) and (h), respectively. Both are of higher quality than the intermediate results I3 I2 and I3 I2 I1 since the original signal is used. The GS output is shown in Figure 3(i). Theoretically, GS should be a dark RZ format because the probe light is a continuous wave. However, owing to the heavy consumption of the carriers in the SOA when there are two, three or four 1 bits in the coupled input signals, as well as the carrier density recovery not being fast enough, a series of small ripples are present at the positions of 0 bits. For the same reason, the 1 bits, whose pulse width should be very wide, are suppressed by the next input pulse when they have not fully recovered. Consequently, the final output GS is in the form of a RZ signal with a little broadening. Although the GS data stream is not a perfect RZ signal, its temporal logic levels still satisfy the designed logic function. Figure 4 shows the measured extinction ratios and eye opening factors of all logic units. All extinction ratios exceed 10 dB, and the eye opening factors exceed 0.7. This scheme has the potential to operate at a higher bit rate because wavelength conversion with a similar program was demonstrated at 320 Gb/s [12,13]. The all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder based on RZ signals at 40 Gbit/s was proposed and experimentally demonstrated employing the XGM effect in SOAs cascaded with detuning bandpass filters. As the final results, correct and clear temporal waveforms and open eye patterns were Figure 3 Temporal wave forms and eye diagrams of all logic units. (a)(d) Original inputs; (e),(f) intermediate results; (g)(i) final encoding outputs. Figure 4 Extinction ratios and opening factors of all logic units. obtained, and extinction ratios exceeding 10 dB were achieved. A more complicated digital priority encoder circuit with a higher operation bit rate could be realized by cascading the 4-bit priority encoder. Moreover, the proposed scheme has the potential to be large-scale integrated. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (2011CB301704), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (60877056 and 60901006) and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of China (NCET-04-0715).


This is a preview of a remote PDF: http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11434-011-4957-2.pdf

Lei Lei, JianJi Dong, Yin Zhang, Yu Yu, XinLiang Zhang. 40-Gb/s all-optical digital 4-bit priority encoder employing cross-gain modulation in semiconductor optical amplifiers, Science Bulletin, 2012, 1204-1208, DOI: 10.1007/s11434-011-4957-2