Editor's Note

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice, Aug 2018

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Editor's Note

Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice Editor 's Note Editor's Note 0 0 Thi s Prefatory is brought to you for free and open access by the Law School Journals at Washington & Lee University School of Law Scholarly Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice by an authorized administrator of Washington & Lee University School of Law Scholarly Commons. For more information , please contact , USA Follow this and additional works at: http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/crsj Part of the Civil Rights and Discrimination Commons, and the Human Rights Law Commons Recommended Citation Editor's Note, 21 Wash. & Lee J. Civ. Rts. & Soc. Just. v (2014). Available at: http://scholarlycommons.law.wlu.edu/crsj/vol21/iss1/3 - Article 3 This issue of the Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice is dedicated to a symposium titled, “Emerging Issues in Child Welfare.” The symposium, held in 2014, was sponsored by the Journal, the Frances Lewis Law Center, the Shepherd Program for the Interdisciplinary Study of Poverty and Human Capability, and Themis Bar Review. Various speakers from a variety of disciplines—including practicing lawyers, government officials, and academics—have reproduced their presentations from the symposium for this issue. The symposium papers explore issues affecting neglected classes of children in the United States, including legal representation for immigrant youth, the impact of a heteronormative family model on the child welfare system, and the plight of LGBT children, to name a few. This scholarship adds to the myriad of others calling for greater attention into the welfare of millions of children in the United States. As Nelson Mandela once said, “There can be no keener revelation of a society's soul than the way in which it treats its children.” This issue also includes three student notes written by members of the Editorial Board. These notes reflect how issues of civil rights and social justice permeate through a broad range of legal disciplines. Topics include the impact of patent and antitrust litigation on the affordability of prescription drugs for the poor and elderly, Fourth Amendment concerns surrounding automobile “black boxes,” and access to healthcare by the transgender community. A great deal of time and effort went into the publication of this issue. I would like to personally thank the Editorial Board, Staff Writers, Lisa Gearheart, Professor Ann Massie, Stephanie Miller and David Knoespel for their efforts. Additionally, the Journal is extremely grateful for the support of Dean Demleitner, Professor Margaret Hu, and Dean Twitty. Tunde Cadmus Editor in Chief


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Editor's Note, Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice, 2018,