Bel the Weather Girl: The Sky Stirs Up Trouble: Tornadoes

Children's Book and Media Review, Oct 2017

When a tornado warning goes off, Bel and her cousin Dylan have to go to the basement. Dylan is scared, but Bel knows that weather isn't so scary once you understand it. Bel tells Dylan that tornadoes are made when warm air, cold air, water, and wind are all combined in a funnel. A tornado won't form unless all the right ingredients are there. Just like the tornado cake they made without the sugar; the cake didn't turn out like it was supposed to!

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Bel the Weather Girl: The Sky Stirs Up Trouble: Tornadoes

Bel the Weather Girl: The Sky Stirs Up Trouble: Tornadoes Ariel Woodbury Follow this and additional works at: http://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cbmr BYU ScholarsArchive Citation - Article 38 Book Review Review When a tornado warning goes off, Bel and her cousin Dylan have to go to the basement. Dylan is scared, but Bel knows that weather isn’t so scary once you understand it. Bel tells Dylan that tornadoes are made when warm air, cold air, water, and wind are all combined in a funnel. A tornado won’t form unless all the right ingredients are there. Just like the tornado cake they made without the sugar; the cake didn’t turn out like it was supposed to! This book is set up in the same way as Belinda Jensen’s other Bel the Weather Girl books. There is a simple story line in which Bel helps her cousin to understand (and not fear) tornadoes. There are blurbs on many of the pages that include more information and fun facts about tornadoes. The other books include an experiment that kids can try in the back to help them understand some of the concepts better, this book has a recipe for tornado cake (which is just a cake that you decorate to look like “it has been swirled by a great wind”). The recipe ties in with the story, but it doesn’t add very much to the book. There is also a helpful glossary and more books and websites to research to learn more. The simple language of these books and the easy teaching style is great for young readers.


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Ariel Woodbury. Bel the Weather Girl: The Sky Stirs Up Trouble: Tornadoes, Children's Book and Media Review, 2017,