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11 papers found.
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Early Impact of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination on Cervical Neoplasia—Nationwide Follow-up of Young Danish Women

Background In clinical trials, vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) have been highly effective against HPV16- or HPV18-associated cervical lesions. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine was licensed in 2006 and subsequently implemented in the Danish vaccination program. The study aim was to use individual information on HPV vaccination status to assess subsequent risk of cervical...

Strongly Decreased Risk of Genital Warts After Vaccination Against Human Papillomavirus: Nationwide Follow-up of Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Girls in Denmark

Background. A reduction in the incidence of genital warts (GWs) is one of the first markers of the effectiveness of vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) at the population level. The aim of this cohort study was to use individual information on HPV vaccination status to assess the effect on risk of GWs. Methods. Population-based registries were used to identify all girls...

GPCRdb: an information system for G protein-coupled receptors

Recent developments in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural biology and pharmacology have greatly enhanced our knowledge of receptor structure-function relations, and have helped improve the scientific foundation for drug design studies. The GPCR database, GPCRdb, serves a dual role in disseminating and enabling new scientific developments by providing reference data...

Genital Warts and Risk of Cancer: A Danish Study of Nearly 50 000 Patients With Genital Warts

Background We conducted a large national cohort study to examine the risk of cancer among men and women with genital warts (GW).

Long-term Absolute Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3 or Worse Following Human Papillomavirus Infection: Role of Persistence

Background Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. It has been suggested that information about high-risk HPV type–specific infection might make cervical cancer screening more effective. Persistent HPV infection could also be a useful screening marker. We estimated the long-term risk...

Sexual risk taking behaviour: prevalence and associated factors. A population-based study of 22 000 Danish men

Background Sexual habits and risky sexual behaviour strongly affect public health. Available data indicate that sexually transmitted infections are increasing in many EU countries. Changes in the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases across Europe are among other factors suggested to be driven by changes in sexual behaviour patterns. The purpose of our study is to assess...

Targeting Human Papillomavirus to Reduce the Burden of Cervical, Vulvar and Vaginal Cancer and Pre-Invasive Neoplasia: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance

Background Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally related to cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasias and cancers. Highly effective vaccines against HPV types 16/18 have been available since 2006, and are currently used in many countries in combination with cervical cancer screening to control the burden of cervical cancer. We estimated the...

The Burden of Genital Warts: A Study of Nearly 70,000 Women from the General Female Population in the 4 Nordic Countries

Objective. To asses the burden and correlates of genital warts in women. Methods. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in 69,147 women (18–45 years of age) randomly chosen from the general population in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Information on clinically diagnosed genital warts and lifestyle habits was collected using a questionnaire. Results. Overall...

The Influence of Hormonal Factors on the Risk of Developing Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer: Results from the EPIC Cohort

Background In addition to HPV, high parity and hormonal contraceptives have been associated with cervical cancer (CC). However, most of the evidence comes from retrospective case-control studies. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate associations between hormonal factors and risk of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3)/carcinoma in situ (CIS...