Advanced search    

Search: authors:"Chung-Shien Wu"

13 papers found.
Use AND, OR, NOT, +word, -word, "long phrase", (parentheses) to fine-tune your search.

Photosynthetic gas exchange responses of Swietenia macrophylla King and Melia azedarach L. plantations under drought conditions

Background The environmental stresses caused by climate change have become more severe in recent decades, affecting tree growth and physiology. Tropical forests have great potential for global carbon sequestration. However, they suffer from heavy rainfall and prolonged dry periods due to climate change. Swietenia macrophylla King and Melia azedarach L. are economically valuable...

Birth of Four Chimeric Plastid Gene Clusters in Japanese Umbrella Pine

Many genes in the plastid genomes (plastomes) of plants are organized as gene clusters, in which genes are co-transcribed, resembling bacterial operons. These plastid operons are highly conserved, even among conifers, whose plastomes are highly rearranged relative to other seed plants. We have determined the complete plastome sequence of Sciadopitys verticillata (Japanese...

Revisiting the Plastid Phylogenomics of Pinaceae with Two Complete Plastomes of Pseudolarix and Tsuga

Phylogeny of the ten Pinaceous genera has long been contentious. Plastid genomes (plastomes) provide an opportunity to resolve this problem because they contain rich evolutionary information. To comprehend the plastid phylogenomics of all ten Pinaceous genera, we sequenced the plastomes of two previously unavailable genera, Pseudolarix amabilis (122,234 bp) and Tsuga chinensis...

Evolutionary Stasis in Cycad Plastomes and the First Case of Plastome GC-Biased Gene Conversion

In angiosperms, gene conversion has been known to reduce the mutational load of plastid genomes (the plastomes). Particularly, more frequent gene conversions in inverted repeat (IR) than in single copy (SC) regions result in contrasting substitution rates between these two regions. However, little has been known about the effect of gene conversion in the evolution of gymnosperm...

Ancient Nuclear Plastid DNA in the Yew Family (Taxaceae)

Plastid-to-nucleus DNA transfer provides a rich genetic resource to the complexity of plant nuclear genome architecture. To date, the evolutionary route of nuclear plastid DNA (nupt) remain unknown in conifers. We have sequenced the complete plastomes of two yews, Amentotaxus formosana and Taxus mairei (Taxaceae of coniferales). Our comparative genomic analyses recovered an...

Chloroplast Phylogenomics Indicates that Ginkgo biloba Is Sister to Cycads

Molecular phylogenetic studies have not yet reached a consensus on the placement of Ginkgoales, which is represented by the only living species, Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo). At least six discrepant placements of ginkgo have been proposed. This study aimed to use the chloroplast phylogenomic approach to examine possible factors that lead to such disagreeing placements. We...

The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Ginkgo biloba Reveals the Mechanism of Inverted Repeat Contraction

We determined the complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo), the only relict of ginkgophytes from the Triassic Period. The cpDNA molecule of ginkgo is quadripartite and circular, with a length of 156,945 bp, which is 6,458 bp shorter than that of Cycas taitungensis. In ginkgo cpDNA, rpl23 becomes pseudo, only one copy of ycf2 is retained, and...

The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Ginkgo biloba Reveals the Mechanism of Inverted Repeat Contraction

Ching-Ping Lin Chung-Shien Wu Ya-Yi Huang Shu-Miaw Chaw The two first authors, Ching-Ping Lin and Chung-Shien Wu, contributed equally to this work. The published version of the paper omitted the co ... -first author footnote designation from name of Chung-Shien Wu. The publisher regrets the error.

Loss of Different Inverted Repeat Copies from the Chloroplast Genomes of Pinaceae and Cupressophytes and Influence of Heterotachy on the Evaluation of Gymnosperm Phylogeny

The relationships among the extant five gymnosperm groups—gnetophytes, Pinaceae, non-Pinaceae conifers (cupressophytes), Ginkgo, and cycads—remain equivocal. To clarify this issue, we sequenced the chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) from two cupressophytes, Cephalotaxus wilsoniana and Taiwania cryptomerioides, and 53 common chloroplast protein-coding genes from another three...

Comparative Chloroplast Genomes of Pinaceae: Insights into the Mechanism of Diversified Genomic Organizations

Pinaceae, the largest family of conifers, has diversified organizations of chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) with the two typical inverted repeats (IRs) highly reduced. To unravel the mechanism of this genomic diversification, we examined the cpDNA organizations from 53 species of the ten Pinaceous genera, including those of Larix decidua (122,474 bp), Picea morrisonicola (124,168 bp...

Comparative Chloroplast Genomics Reveals the Evolution of Pinaceae Genera and Subfamilies

As the largest and the basal-most family of conifers, Pinaceae provides key insights into the evolutionary history of conifers. We present comparative chloroplast genomics and analysis of concatenated 49 chloroplast protein-coding genes common to 19 gymnosperms, including 15 species from 8 Pinaceous genera, to address the long-standing controversy about Pinaceae phylogeny. The...

Chloroplast Genome (cpDNA) of Cycas taitungensis and 56 cp Protein-Coding Genes of Gnetum parvifolium: Insights into cpDNA Evolution and Phylogeny of Extant Seed Plants

Phylogenetic relationships among the 5 groups of extant seed plants are presently unsettled. To reexamine this long-standing debate, we determine the complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of Cycas taitungensis and 56 protein-coding genes encoded in the cpDNA of Gnetum parvifolium. The cpDNA of Cycas is a circular molecule of 163,403 bp with 2 typical large inverted repeats (IRs) of...

Transfer of Chloroplast Genomic DNA to Mitochondrial Genome Occurred At Least 300 MYA

Daryi Wang 0 Yu-Wei Wu Shu-Miaw Chaw 0 Arthur Chun-Chieh Shih Chung-Shien Wu 0 Ya-Nan Wang 0 Research Center for Biodiversity; Institute of Information Science , Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan