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Managing the nutrition program for cow comfort

Comfortable cows are contented cows. However, cows may be comfortable in their environment but also experience some discomfort because of the nutrition program. A good nutritional management program will improve desircow comfort by providing: 1) the proper balance of nutrients for efficient production; 2) buffers for high energy rations to prevent acidosis and consore feet; 3...

Using the somatic cell count report

High-producing dairy herds can consistently average a somatic cell count (SCC) <200,000. Herds with consistently higher averages can decrease SCC and realize higher profits. The SCC report discloses the pitfalls that need to be addressed before improvement can be made.; Dairy Day, 1996, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 1996;

Milk urea nitrogen: a nutritional management tool

Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) analyses can be used to evaluate the nutritional status of dairy herds and for fine tuning the feeding program. MUN values >18 mg/100 ml indicate that dietary protein is being wasted and feed costs could be reduced with ration adjustments. Higher than desired MUN values also indicate the need for additional undegradable intake protein (UIP; bypass protein...

Management strategies: the nutrition program

Reduced milk prices and greater feed costs dictate that dairy farmers carefully manage their nutrition program in order to maintain profitable milk production. Reducing feed cost by feeding less will result in lower milk production and less income over feed cost. Some by-product feeds are less expensive than traditional grain mixes and can be fed to reduce feed cost and maintain...

Performance of cows in the lactation following rbST treatment

The first 305-2x-ME lactation record (after 45 days in milk) projected by the DHI program in 28 cows was not different from their first projected lactation record in a previous lactation in which recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) injections were begun by the 90th day of lactation. These results suggest when rbSTtreated cows are fed and managed properly during lactation and...

Stage of lactation profile reflects nutrition and management

The Stage of Lactation Profile (SOLP) is a good estimate of the shape of the lactation curve for dairy herds. The SOLPs for herds with various milk production levels are somewhat similar. The rates of decline of all SOLPs are about the same. Therefore, the differences in production levels are about the same in late stages of lactation and in early lactation, regardless of...

High quality alfalfa in short supply - now what?

Wetter than normal growing and harvesting conditions have resulted in a short supply of high quality alfalfa. Because forage quality affects milk production in early lactation cows, dairy farmers are encouraged to consider other alternatives to feeding low quality alfalfa to high-producing dairy cows.; Dairy Day, 1993, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 1993;

Somatic cell count inversely related to potential profits in dairying

Somatic Cell Count (SCC) affects productivity of a dairy herd and, thus, potential profit. Almost all SCC problems can be solved by management. The DHIA SCC program is very useful for evaluating the situation in a dairy herd to solve such problems.; Dairy Day, 1992, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 1992;

Heifer feeding and management affect efficiency

Heifer feeding and management programs have a great impact on the efficiency of the future dairy herd. Dairies that feed and manage heifers for calving at about 24 mo of age are optimizing milk production, feed cost for raising heifers, number of replacement heifers available, and return on investment. Replacement heifers represent a considerable investment in labor and feed...

Evaluating DHI records with the dairy herd analyzer

A computer program was developed for analyzing DHI records to evaluate potential losses from 1) reproduction, 2) nutrition, 3) milk quality, and 4) genetics. Production-tested Kansas Holstein herds were grouped according to Rolling Herd Average (RHA), with the groups averaging 13,587, 15,988, 17,938 and 20,227 lb milk/cow/yr. Losses were directly related to RHA, amounting to $573...

Effect of yearly milk per cow on profitability of dairy herds

An analysis of Kansas Holstein herds in 1992 indicated that the yearly milk production per cow had a significant effect on returns to labor and management. The lowest quartile herds (13,445 lb per cow average) had a negative return to management. Herds averaging 20,614 lb per cow yielded $479 return to management. Records become increasingly important in managing the dairy...

Nutrient requirements of dairy cattle revised

The 1988 National Research Council's (NRC) Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle have been revised. Adjustments have been made in the recommended requirements for net energy for lactation (NEL); crude protein (CP); calcium (Ca); phosphorus (P); and vitamins A, D, and E. In addition, suggestions are made for using undegraded intake protein (UIP) and degraded intake protein (DIP...

Feeding and managing early lactation cows

Feeding and managing dairy cows during the prepartum and early lactation periods have more effect on total lactation yields than all other factors. It is during this time that the pattern of milk production is established for the entire lactation. The full production potential of high producing cows cannot be realized unless these periods are given special consideration.; Dairy...

Early lactation somatic cell count should be low

Cows and heifers in milk for fewer than 50 days, as shown on the DHIA Somatic Cell Count report, should have a lower average Somatic Cell Count than cows in milk for more than 300 days, if the dry cow mastitis treatment and management programs are effective. The DHIA Somatic Cell Count (SCC) average for a dairy herd is a good evaluation of a mastitis control program. Since...

Review of production responses from cows fed calcium salt of isobutyric and mixed 5-carbon volatile fatty acids

Recent developments in dairy cattle nutrition have resulted in the marketing of a calcium salt of isobutyric and mixed 5-carbon volatile fatty acids (IsoPlusĀ®). The FDA approved product has been neutralized with calcium to form a dry salt of the acids, which are found naturally in the rumen. The following review of research results is intended as a guide for feeding IsoPlus...

Feed additives

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports James R . Dunham Follow this and additional works at: http://newprairiepress.org/kaesrr Part of the Dairy Science Commons Recommended

Comparison of AM-PM and DHI records

A comparison was made of the AM-PM production testing program with the traditional DHI program during 13 test periods of 1984 in the KSU Dairy Teaching and Research Center herd. Although there were slight variations in daily milk weights and percentages of fat and protein in milk, rolling herd averages were nearly identical. Individual 305-2X-M.E. milk and fat records also were...

Relationship of herd average somatic cell count and spontaneous recovery from subclinical mastitis

The rate of spontaneous recovery from subclinical mastitis was evaluated in 56 Kansas. DHI herds participating in the Somatic Cell Count (SCC) program. Herds were classified as low (>300,000) or high (>600,000) based on herd sec average. Comparisons between low and high SCC-herds were made for each cow's ability to recover from a subclinical case of mastitis (>600,000 SCC). Low...

Lameness in dairy cattle

Foot problems are major concerns for dairies, and care should be taken to avoid promoting them. Preventive measures, with the aid of a veterinarian, must be followed if the problem is expected to be controlled. Feet should be trimmed or at least observed one to two times per year. High concentrate diets should be fed carefully to avoid acidosis. Cows should have limited time...

Preventive health programs for dairy cattle

Always consult your veterinarian when making vaccination decisions. The most common errors are failing to give booster immunizations and doing so at the incorrect time. Animal comfort is a greater determinant of production than vaccinations, and to receive the full benefits of nutrition, genetic, and management programs, cow comfort must be maximized. This does not lessen the...