Advanced search    

Search: authors:"Jonathan Pugh"

7 papers found.
Use AND, OR, NOT, +word, -word, "long phrase", (parentheses) to fine-tune your search.

Evidence-Based Neuroethics, Deep Brain Stimulation and Personality - Deflating, but not Bursting, the Bubble

Gilbert et al. have raised important questions about the empirical grounding of neuroethical analyses of the apparent phenomenon of Deep Brain Stimulation ‘causing’ personality changes. In this paper, we consider how to make neuroethical claims appropriately calibrated to existing evidence, and the role that philosophical neuroethics has to play in this enterprise of ‘evidence...

Brainjacking in deep brain stimulation and autonomy

Ethics, University of Oxford , Oxford , UK 1 Jonathan Pugh 2 Future of Humanity Institute, University of Oxford , Oxford , UK 3 Oxford Functional Neurosurgery, University of Oxford , Oxford , UK ... true, such a Case One Vol.:(011233456789) Brainjacking?; Deep brain stimulation?; Autonomy?; Security?; Responsibility - Jonathan Pugh and Laurie Pycroft are joint first authors. straightforward

Moral Bio-enhancement, Freedom, Value and the Parity Principle

A prominent objection to non-cognitive moral bio-enhancements (NCMBEs) is that they would compromise the recipient’s ‘freedom to fall’. I begin by discussing some ambiguities in this objection, before outlining an Aristotelian reading of it. I suggest that this reading may help to forestall Persson and Savulescu’s ‘God-Machine’ criticism; however, I suggest that the objection...

‘Drugs That Make You Feel Bad’? Remorse-Based Mitigation and Neurointerventions

In many jurisdictions, an offender’s remorse is considered to be a relevant factor to take into account in mitigation at sentencing. The growing philosophical interest in the use of neurointerventions in criminal justice raises an important question about such remorse-based mitigation: to what extent should technologically facilitated remorse be honoured such that it is permitted...

The Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa

There is preliminary evidence, from case reports and investigational studies, to suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) could be used to treat some patients with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Although this research is at an early stage, the invasive nature of the intervention and the vulnerability of the potential patients are such that anticipatory ethical analysis is warranted. In...

Cohen’s Conservatism and Human Enhancement

In an intriguing essay, G. A. Cohen has defended a conservative bias in favour of existing value. In this paper, we consider whether Cohen’s conservatism raises a new challenge to the use of human enhancement technologies. We develop some of Cohen’s suggestive remarks into a new line of argument against human enhancement that, we believe, is in several ways superior to existing...