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40 papers found.
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Effects of boat noise on fish fast-start escape response depend on engine type

Vessel noise represents a relatively recent but rapidly increasing form of pollution, which affects the many organisms that use sound to inform their behavioural decisions. Recent research shows that anthropogenic noise can lead to reduced responsiveness to risk and higher mortality. The current laboratory experiment determined whether the playback of noise from motorboats...

Relative influence of environmental factors on the timing and occurrence of multi-species coral reef fish aggregations

: John H. Choat, Mark I. McCormick, Mike Cappo. Writing ? original draft: Eric E. Fisher. Writing ? review & editing: Eric E. Fisher, John H. Choat, Mark I. McCormick, Mike Cappo. 20 / 23 21 / 23 51

Boat noise impacts risk assessment in a coral reef fish but effects depend on engine type

Human noise pollution has increased markedly since the start of industrialization and there is international concern about how this may impact wildlife. Here we determined whether real motorboat noise affected the behavior, space use and escape response of a juvenile damselfish (Pomacentrus wardi) in the wild, and explored whether fish respond effectively to chemical and visual...

Algae associated with coral degradation affects risk assessment in coral reef fishes

Habitat degradation alters the chemical landscape through which information about community dynamics is transmitted. Olfactory information is crucial for risk assessment in aquatic organisms as predators release odours when they capture prey that lead to an alarm response in conspecific prey. Recent studies show some coral reef fishes are unable to use alarm odours when...

Coral reef fish predator maintains olfactory acuity in degraded coral habitats

Coral reefs around the world are rapidly degrading due to a range of environmental stressors. Habitat degradation modifies the sensory landscape within which predator-prey interactions occur, with implications for olfactory-mediated behaviours. Predator naïve settlement-stage damselfish rely on conspecific damage-released odours (i.e., alarm odours) to inform risk assessments...

Interspecific differences in how habitat degradation affects escape response

Degradation of habitats is widespread and a leading cause of extinctions. Our study determined whether the change in the chemical landscape associated with coral degradation affected the way three fish species use olfactory information to optimize their fast-start escape response. Water from degraded coral habitats affected the fast-start response of the three closely-related...

Lionfish misidentification circumvents an optimized escape response by prey

Invasive lionfish represent an unprecedented problem in the Caribbean basin, where they are causing major changes to foodwebs and habitats through their generalized predation on fishes and invertebrates. To ascertain what makes the red lionfish (Pterois volitans) such a formidable predator, we examined the reaction of a native damselfish prey, the whitetail damsel (Pomacentrus...

Risk assessment and predator learning in a changing world: understanding the impacts of coral reef degradation

, University of Saskatchewan, SK, CanadaMaud C. O. Ferrari AuthorsSearch for Douglas P. Chivers in:Nature Research journals • PubMed • Google ScholarSearch for Mark I. McCormick in:Nature Research journals

Duration of Exposure to Elevated Temperature Affects Competitive Interactions in Juvenile Reef Fishes

Climate change will affect key ecological processes that structure natural communities, but the outcome of interactions between individuals and species will depend on their thermal plasticity. We tested how short- and long-term exposure to projected future temperatures affects intraspecific and interspecific competitive interactions in two species of coral reef damselfishes. In...

Temporal Links in Daily Activity Patterns between Coral Reef Predators and Their Prey

Few studies have documented the activity patterns of both predators and their common prey over 24 h diel cycles. This study documents the temporal periodicity of two common resident predators of juvenile reef fishes, Cephalopholis cyanostigma (rockcod) and Pseudochromis fuscus (dottyback) and compares these to the activity and foraging pattern of a common prey species, juvenile...

Plasticity of Escape Responses: Prior Predator Experience Enhances Escape Performance in a Coral Reef Fish

Teleost and amphibian prey undertake fast-start escape responses during a predatory attack in an attempt to avoid being captured. Although previously viewed as a reflex reaction controlled by the autonomic nervous system, the escape responses of individuals when repeatedly startled are highly variable in their characteristics, suggesting some behavioural mediation of the response...

Effect of elevated carbon dioxide on shoal familiarity and metabolism in a coral reef fish

Atmospheric CO2 is expected to more than double by the end of the century. The resulting changes in ocean chemistry will affect the behaviour, sensory systems and physiology of a range of fish species. Although a number of past studies have examined effects of CO2 in gregarious fishes, most have assessed individuals in social isolation, which can alter individual behaviour and...

Ultimate Predators: Lionfish Have Evolved to Circumvent Prey Risk Assessment Abilities

Invasive species cause catastrophic alterations to communities worldwide by changing the trophic balance within ecosystems. Ever since their introduction in the mid 1980's common red lionfish, Pterois volitans, are having dramatic impacts on the Caribbean ecosystem by displacing native species and disrupting food webs. Introduced lionfish capture prey at extraordinary rates...

Lethal effects of habitat degradation on fishes through changing competitive advantage

Mark I. McCormick * 0 0 ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University , Townsville, Queensland , Australia Coral bleaching has

Feeling the heat: the effect of acute temperature changes on predator–prey interactions in coral reef fish

Recent studies demonstrate that the elevated temperatures predicted to occur by the end of the century can affect the physiological performance and behaviour of larval and juvenile fishes; however, little is known of the effect of these temperatures on ecological processes, such as predator–prey interactions. Here, we show that exposure to elevated temperatures significantly...

Syndromes or Flexibility: Behavior during a Life History Transition of a Coral Reef Fish

The theory of behavioral syndromes focuses on quantifying variation in behavior within and among individual organisms and attempts to account for the maintenance of differences in behavior that occur in a consistent manner among individuals. Behavioral syndromes have potentially important ecological consequences (e.g. survivorship tradeoffs) and can be shaped by population...

Reproductive Acclimation to Increased Water Temperature in a Tropical Reef Fish

Understanding the capacity of organisms to cope with projected global warming through acclimation and adaptation is critical to predicting their likely future persistence. While recent research has shown that developmental acclimation of metabolic attributes to ocean warming is possible, our understanding of the plasticity of key fitness-associated traits, such as reproductive...

It Pays to Be Pushy: Intracohort Interference Competition between Two Reef Fishes

Competition is often most intense between similar sized organisms that have similar ecological requirements. Many coral reef fish species settle preferentially to live coral at the end of their larval phase where they interact with other species that recruited to the same habitat patch at a similar time. Mortality is high and usually selective and individuals must compete for low...

Metamorphosing reef fishes avoid predator scent when choosing a home

Alexander L. Vail Mark I. McCormick Subject collections 0 Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge , Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK 1 School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook

Chemical Alarm Cues Are Conserved within the Coral Reef Fish Family Pomacentridae

Fishes are known to use chemical alarm cues from both conspecifics and heterospecifics to assess local predation risks and enhance predator detection. Yet it is unknown how recognition of heterospecific cues arises for coral reef fishes. Here, we test if naïve juvenile fish have an innate recognition of heterospecific alarm cues. We also examine if there is a relationship between...