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Lung recruitment in ARDS: We are still confused, but on a higher PEEP level

Peter M Spieth 0 Marcelo Gama de Abreu 0 0 Pulmonary Engineering Group, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Therapy, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of

Correlation of Lung Collapse and Gas Exchange - A Computer Tomographic Study in Sheep and Pigs with Atelectasis in Otherwise Normal Lungs

Background Atelectasis can provoke pulmonary and non-pulmonary complications after general anaesthesia. Unfortunately, there is no instrument to estimate atelectasis and prompt changes of mechanical ventilation during general anaesthesia. Although arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and intrapulmonary shunt have both been suggested to correlate with atelectasis, studies...

Variable versus conventional lung protective mechanical ventilation during open abdominal surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Background General anesthesia usually requires mechanical ventilation, which is traditionally accomplished with constant tidal volumes in volume- or pressure-controlled modes. Experimental studies suggest that the use of variable tidal volumes (variable ventilation) recruits lung tissue, improves pulmonary function and reduces systemic inflammatory response. However, it is...

Positive End-Expiratory Pressure and Variable Ventilation in Lung-Healthy Rats under General Anesthesia

Objectives Variable ventilation (VV) seems to improve respiratory function in acute lung injury and may be combined with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in order to protect the lungs even in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that VV in combination with moderate levels of PEEP reduce the deterioration of pulmonary function related to general anesthesia. Hence, we aimed at...

Short-term effects of noisy pressure support ventilation in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure

Introduction This study aims at comparing the very short-term effects of conventional and noisy (variable) pressure support ventilation (PSV) in mechanically ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Methods Thirteen mechanically ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure were enrolled in this monocentric, randomized crossover study. Patients...

The effects of salbutamol on epithelial ion channels depend on the etiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome but not the route of administration

Introduction We investigated the effects of intravenous and intratracheal administration of salbutamol on lung morphology and function, expression of ion channels, aquaporin, and markers of inflammation, apoptosis, and alveolar epithelial/endothelial cell damage in experimental pulmonary (p) and extrapulmonary (exp) mild acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods In this...

Regional lung aeration and ventilation during pressure support and biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation in experimental lung injury

Introduction There is an increasing interest in biphasic positive airway pressure with spontaneous breathing (BIPAP+SBmean), which is a combination of time-cycled controlled breaths at two levels of continuous positive airway pressure (BIPAP+SBcontrolled) and non-assisted spontaneous breathing (BIPAP+SBspont), in the early phase of acute lung injury (ALI). However, pressure...

Extrapolation in the analysis of lung aeration by computed tomography: a validation study

Introduction Computed tomography (CT) is considered the gold standard for quantification of global or regional lung aeration and lung mass. Quantitative CT, however, involves the exposure to ionizing radiation and requires manual image processing. We recently evaluated an extrapolation method which calculates quantitative CT parameters characterizing the entire lung from only 10...

Extrapolation in the analysis of lung aeration by computed tomography: a validation study

Computed tomography (CT) is considered the gold standard for quantification of global or regional lung aeration and lung mass. Quantitative CT, however, involves the exposure to ionizing radiation and requires manual image processing. We recently evaluated an extrapolation method which calculates quantitative CT parameters characterizing the entire lung from only 10 reference CT...

Computed tomographic assessment of lung weights in trauma patients with early posttraumatic lung dysfunction

Introduction Quantitative computed tomography (qCT)-based assessment of total lung weight (Mlung) has the potential to differentiate atelectasis from consolidation and could thus provide valuable information for managing trauma patients fulfilling commonly used criteria for acute lung injury (ALI). We hypothesized that qCT would identify atelectasis as a frequent mimic of early...