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A Nearly Complete Juvenile Skull of the Marsupial Sparassocynus derivatus from the Pliocene of Argentina, the Affinities of “Sparassocynids”, and the Diversification of Opossums (Marsupialia; Didelphimorphia; Didelphidae)

“Sparassocynids” are small, carnivorously-adapted marsupials known from the late Miocene and Pliocene of South America, thought to be relatives of living didelphid opossums but of otherwise uncertain phylogenetic relationships. Here, we describe a nearly complete juvenile skull of the “sparassocynid” Sparassocynus derivatus, from the Pliocene (~5–3 million years old) Chapadmalal...

Correction: Skeleton of an unusual, cat-sized marsupial relative (Metatheria: Marsupialiformes) from the middle Eocene (Lutetian: 44-43 million years ago) of Turkey

. Beck The following information is missing from the Funding section: We acknowledge funding from National Geographic Society for the fieldwork in Uzuncarsidere that resulted in the discovery of the

Skeleton of an unusual, cat-sized marsupial relative (Metatheria: Marsupialiformes) from the middle Eocene (Lutetian: 44-43 million years ago) of Turkey

We describe a near-complete, three-dimensionally preserved skeleton of a metatherian (relative of modern marsupials) from the middle Eocene (Lutetian: 44–43 million years ago) Lülük member of the Uzunçarşıdere Formation, central Turkey. With an estimated body mass of 3–4 kg, about the size of a domestic cat (Felis catus) or spotted quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), it is an order of...

The Skull of Epidolops ameghinoi from the Early Eocene Itaboraí Fauna, Southeastern Brazil, and the Affinities of the Extinct Marsupialiform Order Polydolopimorphia

. Beck 0 1 0 School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales , Sydney, NSW 2052 , Australia 1 School of Environment & Life Sciences, University of Salford , M5 4WT

A new, large-bodied omnivorous bat (Noctilionoidea: Mystacinidae) reveals lost morphological and ecological diversity since the Miocene in New Zealand

. Worthy AuthorsSearch for Suzanne J. Hand in:Nature Research journals • PubMed • Google Scholar Search for Robin M. D. Beck in:Nature Research journals • PubMed • Google Scholar Search for Michael Archer

Australia's Oldest Marsupial Fossils and their Biogeographical Implications

BackgroundWe describe new cranial and post-cranial marsupial fossils from the early Eocene Tingamarra Local Fauna in Australia and refer them to Djarthia murgonensis, which was previously known only from fragmentary dental remains.Methodology/Principal FindingsThe new material indicates that Djarthia is a member of Australidelphia, a pan-Gondwanan clade comprising all extant...