Biological Invasions

http://link.springer.com/journal/10530

List of Papers (Total 183)

More than “100 worst” alien species in Europe

“One hundred worst” lists of alien species of the greatest concern proved useful for raising awareness of the risks and impacts of biological invasions amongst the general public, politicians and stakeholders. All lists so far have been based on expert opinion and primarily aimed at representativeness of the taxonomic and habitat diversity rather than at quantifying the harm the ...

Human-mediated introduction of geoengineering earthworms in the Fennoscandian arctic

It is now well established that European earthworms are re-shaping formerly glaciated forests in North America with dramatic ecological consequences. However, few have considered the potential invasiveness of this species assemblage in the European arctic. Here we argue that some earthworm species (Lumbricus rubellus, Lumbricus terrestris and Aporrectodea sp.) with great ...

Historical ecology of a biological invasion: the interplay of eutrophication and pollution determines time lags in establishment and detection

Human disturbance modifies selection regimes, depressing native species fitness and enabling the establishment of non-indigenous species with suitable traits. A major impediment to test the effect of disturbance on invasion success is the lack of long-term data on the history of invasions. Here, we overcome this problem and reconstruct the effect of disturbance on the invasion of ...

Invasion legacy effects versus sediment deposition as drivers of riparian vegetation

Riparian zones are formed by interactions between fluvio-geomorphological processes, such as sediment deposition, and biota, such as vegetation. Establishment of invasive alien plant (IAP) species along rivers may influence vegetation dynamics, evidenced as higher seasonal or inter-annual fluctuations in native plant diversity when IAP cover is high. This could impact the overall ...

Environmental and ecological factors influencing the spillover of the non-native kelp, Undaria pinnatifida, from marinas into natural rocky reef communities

The non-native kelp, Undaria pinnatifida, is considered one of the world’s worst invasive species. The northeast Atlantic is a hotspot of Undaria invasion, yet there is limited knowledge on its invasion dynamics. In the UK its distribution is strongly associated with artificial structures, primarily marina and harbour pontoons, with relatively few records of Undaria on natural ...

Predators and parasitoids of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis, in its native range and invaded areas

The harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) has rapidly spread in several continents over the past 30 years and is considered an invasive alien species. The success of H. axyridis as an invader is often attributed to weak control by natural enemies. In this paper, we provide an overview of current knowledge on predators and parasitoids of H. axyridis. The ...

Non-native species in urban environments: patterns, processes, impacts and challenges

Although urban ecosystems are hotspots for biological invasions, the field of invasion science has given scant attention to invasion dynamics and the challenges facing managers in towns and cities. This paper provides an introduction to the growing challenges of understanding and managing invasive species in urban systems, and the context for a special issue of Biological ...

Temporal variability in lotic macroinvertebrate communities associated with invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) activity levels and substrate character

Invasive signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) are considered to be the most prevalent non-native crayfish species in Europe. Where large populations become established they have significant and long-term effects on benthic macroinvertebrate communities. However, much less is known about how community effects associated with crayfish invasion change in the short-term as a ...

Exploring the attitudes to and uptake of biosecurity practices for invasive non-native species: views amongst stakeholder organisations working in UK natural environments

Invasions by invasive non-native species (INNS) can have profound consequences for natural environments, impacting on biodiversity and the biophysical landscape in ways that can endanger other species, human wellbeing and infrastructure. The financial costs of dealing with established INNS populations can be extremely high. Biosecurity measures (simple procedures designed to reduce ...

Drivers of risk perceptions about the invasive non-native plant Japanese knotweed in domestic gardens

How people perceive risks posed by invasive non-native plants (INNP) can influence attitudes and consequently likely influence behavioural decisions. Although some drivers of risk perception for INNP have been identified, research has not determined those for INNP in domestic gardens. This is concerning as domestic gardens are where people most commonly encounter INNP, and where ...

Bio-economic optimisation of surveillance to confirm broadscale eradications of invasive pests and diseases

Although pest eradications from islands have been successful and impart biodiversity benefits, eradications at regional/national scales are more challenging. Such broadscale eradications incur high repeated costs (e.g. control and surveillance effort) because the entire area cannot be treated at one time, and a progressive ‘treat-evaluate-move on’ approach must be employed. We ...

Awareness, concern and willingness to adopt biosecure behaviours: public perceptions of invasive tree pests and pathogens in the UK

The growing incidence of invasive tree pest and disease outbreaks is recognised as an increasing threat to ecosystem services and human wellbeing. Linked to global trade, human movement and climate change, a number of outbreaks have attracted high public and media attention. However, there is surprisingly little evidence characterising the nature of public attentiveness to these ...

Herbaceous invaders in temperate forests: a systematic review of their ecology and proposed mechanisms of invasion

We present a systematic literature review of exotic understory forest herbaceous invasions with a focus on the forests of East Asia (EAS) and Eastern North America (ENA), two dominant regions of the north temperate deciduous forest biome. We examined the biogeographic origins of herbaceous invaders in EAS and ENA forests, summarized their life histories and ecology, and compiled ...

Acorns of invasive Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) in Europe are larval hosts for moths and beetles

In their first phase of expanding into new areas, invasive plants often take advantage of the inability of existing herbivores and pathogenic species to exploit them. However, in the longer term local enemies may adapt to using these invasive species as a food source. This study assesses the use of mature acorns of two oak species in Europe (the native Pedunculate Oak Quercus robur ...

Risk management to prioritise the eradication of new and emerging invasive non-native species

Robust tools are needed to prioritise the management of invasive non-native species (INNS). Risk assessment is commonly used to prioritise INNS, but fails to take into account the feasibility of management. Risk management provides a structured evaluation of management options, but has received little attention to date. We present a risk management scheme to assess the feasibility ...

Distribution and socio-ecological impacts of the invasive alien cactus Opuntia stricta in eastern Africa

Many cactus species have been introduced around the world and have subsequently become major invaders, inducing social and ecological costs. We recorded the distribution of Opuntia stricta in eastern Africa, and conducted 200 household interviews using semi-structured questionnaires to assess local perceptions of O. stricta in Laikipia County, Kenya. Opuntia stricta was widespread ...

Distribution of the invasive bryozoan Schizoporella japonica in Great Britain and Ireland and a review of its European distribution

The bryozoan Schizoporella japonica Ortmann (1890) was first recorded in European waters in 2010 and has since been reported from further locations in Great Britain (GB) and Norway. This paper provides a new earliest European record for the species from 2009, a first record from Ireland and presence and absence records from a total of 231 marinas and harbours across GB, Ireland, ...

Beyond protocols: improving the reliability of expert-based risk analysis underpinning invasive species policies

Risk assessment tools for listing invasive alien species need to incorporate all available evidence and expertise. Beyond the wealth of protocols developed to date, we argue that the current way of performing risk analysis has several shortcomings. In particular, lack of data on ecological impacts, transparency and repeatability of assessments as well as the incorporation of ...

Getting invasive species on the political agenda: agenda setting and policy formulation in the case of ash dieback in the UK

This study reviews how the issue of ash dieback has been placed on the political agenda in the UK, a country where the disease has affected one of the largest national extents, thus representing a particularly severe case. Comparisons are made between how the scientific community framed the ash dieback threat and the resulting response strategy and how both the media and the ...

Classical biological control of insect pests of trees: facts and figures

Classical biological control (CBC) is the introduction of a natural enemy of exotic origin to control a pest, usually also exotic, aiming at permanent control of the pest. CBC has been carried out widely over a variety of target organisms, but most commonly against insects, using parasitoids and predators and, occasionally, pathogens. Until 2010, 6158 introductions of parasitoids ...