Palgrave Communications

http://www.nature.com/palcomms

List of Papers (Total 238)

Interest rates forecasting and stress testing in India: a PCA-ARIMA approach

In the Basel III era, measuring, managing, mitigating and forecasting interest rate risk has become significant. In the first study of its kind, this paper develops a principal component analysis-based forecasting of interest rates of different maturities and stress testing approach in a univariate auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) framework in the context of...

Revising the eclipse prediction scheme in the Antikythera mechanism

In 1901, an extraordinary ancient Greek artefact was discovered in a shipwreck just off the tiny island of Antikythera. It was later shown to be a complex astronomical calculating machine and is now known as the Antikythera Mechanism. In 2005, it was established that it predicted eclipses, using a 7th century BC Babylonian eclipse cycle of 223 lunar months, known as the Saros...

Beyond the 2% fetishism: studying the practice of collective action in transatlantic affairs

NATO burden sharing is currently hotly contested. While it has been measured at the political, economic, and military levels and being looked at from the input and output side, the most commonly used variable to measure NATO BS is considering the percentage of GDP that a country spends on defense, which NATO agreed upon in 2014 should be 2%. The aim of this article is twofold...

Kick the hive, get the bees: graffiti writers as assemblage and direct action political actors in their battle against H&M

In October of 2017 fast fashion retailers H&M produced an online ad that featured some of Jason ‘REVOK’ Williams’ graffiti in the background. Revok filed a cease and desist order to get H&M to stop using his work in their ad. H&M then sued him, claiming he had no right to copyright protections because the work was produced illegally. This lawsuit became public knowledge and...

Gender, work, non-work and the invisible migrant: au pairs in contemporary Britain

Campaigns by Uber drivers, Deliveroo riders and McDonalds workers have highlighted problems with the new world of platform economies and zero-hour contracts. At the same time, the Brexit process has opened up debates about the UK’s dependence on low-waged workers from the EU. Together these trends raise questions about who is going to do low-paid, labour intensive work in the...

Young and unafraid: queer criminology’s unbounded potential

Queer criminology, a fairly young subfield, deals with matters of import for sexual and gender minorities, particularly LGBTQ+ populations. Areas of interest include reducing invisibility and inequity, though these pursuits can sometimes be accompanied with potential pitfalls or unintended consequences. This article provides an overview of the goals and considerations of queer...

How to survive a crisis: reclaiming philosophy as a public practice

Philosophy is often understood as an isolated discipline in higher education, as a form of study removed from the concerns of everyday life and the majority of the public. Although philosophy is, in one sense, a professional discipline in higher education, this conception is limiting and severely underdetermines possibilities for philosophy as a public practice. As a public...

What can policymakers learn from feminist strategies to combine contextualised evidence with advocacy?

We give a short overview of feminist perspectives on the use of evidence in policy making, covering both empirical and conceptual work. We present the case of the Conflict Tactics Scale, a measure of interpersonal violence that is both widely used and heavily criticised in work on violence between intimate partners. We examine this case to illustrate the way that feminist...

Elements of indigenous socio-ecological knowledge show resilience despite ecosystem changes in the forest-grassland mosaics of the Nilgiri Hills, India

The Nilgiri Hills in the Western Ghats of India constitute a region of high biological and cultural diversity, and include an endangered shola forest-grassland mosaic ecosystem. A mosaic ecosystem is one consisting of adjacent, coexisting patches of highly distinct naturally occurring land states (in this case, shola forest and natural grassland). Changes in the landscape since...

Considering transgender and gender nonconforming people in health communication campaigns

Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) people have become more visible and risen in the American public’s consciousness in recent years. Despite this visibility and some political gains such as piecemeal advances in legal gender recognition and nondiscrimination protection, TGNC people continue to experience extensive health and social disparities. Notably, these disparities...

Pharming animals: a global history of antibiotics in food production (1935–2017)

Since their advent during the 1930s, antibiotics have not only had a dramatic impact on human medicine, but also on food production. On farms, whaling and fishing fleets as well as in processing plants and aquaculture operations, antibiotics were used to treat and prevent disease, increase feed conversion, and preserve food. Their rapid diffusion into nearly all areas of food...

Policy change and the narratives of Russia’s think tanks

Russia’s ruling regime, dominated by Vladimir Putin since he first became president in 2000, is often seen as presenting a consistent and coherent narrative and allowing little space for plurality of opinions. While it is the case that at the level of metanarrative, a consistent official story of a Russia resurgent both domestically and internationally has been told, analysis of...

Long-term ecology of investors in a financial market

The cornerstone of modern finance is the efficient market hypothesis. Under this hypothesis all information available about a financial asset is immediately incorporated into its price dynamics by fully rational investors. In contrast to this hypothesis many studies have pointed out behavioral biases in investors. Recently it has become possible to access databases that track the...

Group formation under limited resources: narrow basin of equality

The formation of groups in competition and the aggressive interactions between them are ubiquitous phenomena in society. These include student activities in the classroom, election races between political parties, and intensifying trade wars between countries. Why do individuals form themselves into groups? What is the optimal size of groups? And how does the group size...

What makes people approve or condemn mind upload technology? Untangling the effects of sexual disgust, purity and science fiction familiarity

The idea of separating a person’s consciousness and transferring it to another medium—'mind upload'—is being actively discussed in science, philosophy, and science fiction. Mind upload technologies are currently also being developed by private companies in Silicon Valley, and similar technological developments have received significant funding in the EU. Mind upload has important...

Hydro-social metabolism: scaling of birth rate with regional water use

Population growth is often intuitively linked with proportionally higher use of fresh water resources. However, this implies that water use per capita does not change with population growth. We not only find that birth rates of regions are negatively related with its water use per capita (i.e., higher birth rate is associated with lower water use), but also that birth rates scale...

Right-wing populism and the dynamics of style: a discourse-analytic perspective on mediated political performances

This article offers new ways of conceptualising style in right wing populist communicative performances, by foregrounding a structured and conceptually informed use of “style” that moves beyond the descriptive sense routinely employed in political communication. Specifically, it explores how a discourse-analytic approach to mediated populist discourse can inform and advance the...

Invertebrate disgust reduction in and out of school and its effects on state intrinsic motivation

Invertebrates are used in environmental, biology, and science education. However, they can elicit disgust, which can be detrimental for motivational and learning outcomes. In addition, practical work including hands-on interaction with living invertebrates could be a viable way to reduce invertebrate disgust and strengthen state intrinsic motivation. Moreover, Big-Five...

A psychology of the film

The cinema as a cultural institution has been studied by academic researchers in the arts and humanities. At present, cultural media studies are the home to the aesthetics and critical analysis of film, film history and other branches of film scholarship. Probably less known to most is that research psychologists working in social and life science labs have also contributed to...

The liquid politics of an urban age

In fragile social and economic societies, water governance systems have rarely managed to meet everyone’s needs, but rather misrecognised the demand of those excluded from decision-making structures. Across regions, underlying socio-political issues have often remained unaddressed on the basis that water scarcity is primarily caused by geo-climatic conditions. Exclusionary...

Analysing the role of virtualisation and visualisation on interdisciplinary knowledge exchange in stem cell research processes

Interdisciplinary work is an increasingly frequent and important aspect of scientific research. However, successful knowledge exchange and collaboration between experts is itself a challenging activity with both technical and social components that require consideration. Here, this article analyses the cultural factors involved in interdisciplinary research, specifically in the...

Regional elections in Russia: instruments of authoritarian legitimacy or instability?

This study examines three rounds of regional assembly and gubernatorial elections in Russia that took place in September 2015, 2016 and 2017. In particular, it examines the ways in which the regime has manipulated the elections to guarantee the victory of United Russia. The study shows that the Kremlin has adopted a new electoral strategy. Rather than engaging in the risky...

Poverty and mental health: the work of the female sanitary inspectors in Bradford (c. 1901–1912)

Although there are many excellent studies of the work of pioneer women public health officers, few accounts dwell on mental health issues or discuss any relationship that such staff might have understood to exist between poverty and mental health in the early twentieth century. This is a remarkable omission considering that social and feminist historians have highlighted the...

Re-centering Central Asia: China’s “New Great Game” in the old Eurasian Heartland

China’s President Xi Jinping’s Central Asian tour in fall 2013 marked Beijing’s unprecedented (re)turn to Central Asia as a lynchpin of the “Silk Road Economic Belt” of the globally ambitious Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). China’s BRI positions Central Asia as the crucial nexus for the cross-regional long-distance loops of trade, investment, and infrastructure development. By...